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Transcript

The WWI Timeline of America

May 7th, 1915

Sinking of the Lusitania

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1915-1920

March 8th, 1917

The Russian Revolution

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April 13th, 1917

The Committee on Public Information

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June 15th, 1917

The Espionage Act

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Jan. 8th, 1918

Wilson's 14 Points Speech

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Jan. 17th, 1917

The Zimmerman Telegram

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April 6th, 1917

The U.S Enters WWI

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May 18th, 1917

The Selective Service Act

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July 28th, 1917

The War Industries Board

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Feb. 1918

Influenza Pandemic

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May 16th, 1918

The Sedition Act

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Sept. 26th, 1918

The Meuse Argonne Offensive

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Nov. 11th, 1918

Armstice Day

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June 28th, 1919

Treaty of Versailles

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Jan. 10th, 1920

Formation of the League of Nations

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The Influenza Pandemic

February 1918 - April 1920

The influenza pandemic of 1918, commonly known as the Spanish flu, swept across America during World War I, infecting millions of people and causing widespread illness and death. The pandemic strained healthcare systems, disrupted daily life, and had a significant impact on the war effort as many soldiers fell ill, reducing military readiness. Despite its severity, the influenza pandemic received relatively little attention compared to the war, due to concealment by the government.

The Sinking of the Lusitania

May 7th, 1915

The sinking of the Lusitania, a British passenger ship, occurred during World War I when it was torpedoed by a German submarine, six days after leaving New York City. The attack resulted in the deaths of over 1,100 passengers and crew, including many Americans, sparking outrage in the United States. This event played a significant role in eventually leading the U.S. to enter the war against Germany and its allies.

The War Industries Board

July 28th, 1917

During World War I, the War Industries Board (WIB) was established in the United States to coordinate the production of war materials and regulate industry for maximum efficiency. The WIB organized resources, allocated materials, and set production priorities to support the war effort. By standardizing production and mobilizing resources, the WIB played a crucial role in ensuring a steady supply of weapons, equipment, and supplies for the American military and its allies.

The Espionage Act

June 15th, 1917

During World War I, the Espionage Act of 1917 was enacted in the United States to prohibit interference with military operations and to prevent support of the nation's enemies during wartime. This act imposed severe penalties, including fines and imprisonment, for individuals who engaged in activities deemed dangerous to national security or who obstructed the draft process. While intended to safeguard the country's interests, the Espionage Act also sparked controversy over its restrictions on freedom of speech and press rights.

The Russian Revolution

March 8th, 1917

The 1917 Russian Revolution was a series of events that led to the overthrow of the Tsarist government and the establishment of a provisional government, followed by the Bolshevik seizure of power later that year under Lenin. This revolution caused Russia to withdraw from World War I, which had significant consequences for the Allied Powers as they lost a major ally on the Eastern Front.

Wilson's 14 Points Speech

January 8th, 1918

Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points was a speech delivered in 1918 outlining his vision for a post-World War I world based on principles such as self-determination, open diplomacy, and disarmament. Wilson aimed to promote peace and prevent future conflicts by advocating for free trade, territorial adjustments based on the desires of the affected peoples, and the establishment of a League of Nations to mediate disputes. Although the Fourteen Points were influential in shaping the post-war peace negotiations, not all of Wilson's proposals were fully realized in the final Treaty of Versailles.

The Zimmerman Telegram

January 17th, 1917

The Zimmerman Telegram was a secret message sent by the German government to Mexico in 1917, proposing a military alliance against the United States. In exchange, Germany promised to help Mexico regain territories lost to the U.S., including Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. When the telegram was intercepted and decoded by British intelligence, it outraged the American public and contributed to the U.S. decision to enter World War I.

The U.S. Enters WWI

April 6th, 1917

The United States entered World War I in April 1917 following a series of events, including unrestricted submarine warfare by Germany and the interception of the Zimmermann Telegram. President Woodrow Wilson sought to "make the world safe for democracy" and declared war on Germany to defend American interests and promote global peace. The arrival of American troops bolstered the Allied Powers' strength and played a crucial role in tipping the balance of power in favor of the Allies.

The Committee on Public Information is Founded

April 13th, 1917

During World War I, the Committee on Public Information (CPI) in the United States was established to promote public support for the war effort through propaganda and media campaigns. Led by George Creel, the CPI utilized various tactics such as posters, pamphlets, and films to shape public opinion and maintain morale. Its efforts aimed to unify the nation behind the war and generate support for government policies, while also fostering anti-German sentiment and promoting patriotism.

The Selective Services Act

May 18th, 1917

The Selective Service Act, passed by the United States Congress in 1917, authorized the federal government to raise a national army for World War I through conscription. Under this act, eligible men between the ages of 21 and 30 were required to register for the draft. The Selective Service Act significantly expanded the size and strength of the American military and played a crucial role in mobilizing troops to support the war effort overseas.

The Sedition Act

May 16th, 1918

During World War I, the Sedition Act of 1918 was enacted in the United States to suppress dissent and criticism of the government, military, or war effort. This act made it illegal to speak out against the war, the government, or the Constitution, leading to the arrest and prosecution of individuals who expressed anti-war sentiments or criticized government policies. The Sedition Act was controversial for its restriction of free speech and press freedoms, and it was used to silence dissenting voices of any type during the war.

The Meuse Argonne Offensive

September 26th, 1918

The Meuse-Argonne Offensive was a major military campaign fought by the Allied Powers against Germany on the Western Front during World War I. Launched on September 26, 1918, it was the largest American-led operation of the war, involving over a million U.S. soldiers. The offensive aimed to break through German lines, capture key strategic positions, and ultimately force Germany to surrender, contributing significantly to the end of the war.

Armstice Day

November 11th, 1918

Armistice Day was the ceasefire agreement that ended World War I on November 11, 1918. The armistice, signed in a railway carriage in Compiègne, France, marked the cessation of hostilities between the Allied Powers and Germany, effectively ending the war.

The Treaty of Versailles

June 28th, 1919

The Treaty of Versailles, signed in 1919, was the peace settlement that officially ended World War I between the Allied Powers and Germany. It imposed heavy reparations on Germany, reduced its military capabilities, and placed blame for the war solely on the German government. However, the treaty's harsh terms sowed resentment and economic instability in Germany, contributing to the rise of Adolf Hitler and the outbreak of World War II.

Formation of the League of Nations

January 10th, 1920

Following World War I, the League of Nations was established in 1920 as an international organization aimed at promoting peace and cooperation among nations. Proposed by President Woodrow Wilson as part of his Fourteen Points, the League sought to prevent future conflicts through collective security and diplomatic negotiations. Although the League of Nations faced challenges and ultimately proved ineffective in preventing the outbreak of World War II, it laid the groundwork for the establishment of the United Nations.