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Transcript

AFRICAN AMERICANS DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Just like almost all groups during the American Revolution, African Americans were divided over which side to support.

PATRIots

LOYALISTS

IMPORTANT PEOPLE

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The African Americans who joined the Loyalists side of the war supported the British in hopes that they would be set free.Virginia's royal govenror, Lord Dunmore, promised to free any slave who joined the British forces. Hundreds joined including escape slaves from North Carolina.When British General Cornwallis invaded the South, thousands of escaped slaves helped the troops with supplies and shelter.After the war, some African-American loyalists were transported to Canada, some were sent to Florida and some to England.

African American Loyalists

Many free African-Americans and some enslaved African-Americans joined the Patriots to fight against the British. Those who were enslaved were hoping to be set free if the Patriots won.At the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in Greensboro, there are many accounts of African-Americans serving in the Continental Army.

African American Patriots

In December 1778, he enlisted in the Revolutionary War and served for 3 years. After the war he moved to Raleigh and became a missionary to slaves and a schoolteacher.

John Chavis

An enslaved man from North Carolina, he joined the British army in 1776. He moved to Canada and became a leader of a group of Black Loyalists. He convinced the British to move 1200 blacks to Sierra Leone where they enjoyed equality and freedom.

Thomas Peters

An enslaved man who took the place of his owner who did not want to serve in the North Carolina Brigade. His owner, William Kitchin promised to free him after the war. He served at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. After the war he was sold, not set free. However, the North Carolina General Assembly freed him due to his service in the Army.

Ned Griffin