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Transcript

Week 2

Food and Cultures

Discussion Questions

Rub or knead the arm.

Pending Question

indigestion

"pega"

Page 60

Page 60

Page 61

Listening Up

Page 61

Listening Up

practice

Restaurant Idioms

practice

Eating Verbs

ViDEO

ViDEO

to you?

unbearable

or

bearable

Is it

Slurp your food away

No tipping

Clink your glass

Eye contact while toasting

EAT WITH YOUR LEFT HAND

SIP YOUR drink

chew gum in public places

Turn down a drink

In a restaurant, ask for food to share with people at the table

More Information

More Information

More Information

More Information

Discussion Questions

- If you have to move to one of these countries, which culture do you consider more difficult to adapt to based on the dining etiquette? Why? - What caught your attention from the previous cultures? - What advice would you give a foreigner visiting your country who would like to show good manners?

OPTIONS: orderrecommendfinedrinkpopularwaitress

DINNER DATE

Practice

Work in groups.

Let's Practice

IN GEORGIA, IT'S RUDE TO SIP YOUR WINE AT SUPRA. At what Georgians call a supra (traditional feast), wine is drunk only at toasts. So wait for those... and then down the whole glass at once.
In Turkey, chewing gum in public, especially during a meal, is seen as impolite and disrespectful. It’s best to avoid it altogether.
A behavior for which you might have been scolded as a kid is considered good manners in Japan. Slurping is considered a compliment for a chef, a sign that you’ve enjoyed your food.
In Russia, there's nothing worse than turning vodka down. Since offering someone a drink is a sign of trust and friendship, it's a good idea to take it. Even if it is 9 a.m.
Never clink glasses together when drinking beer. This is a throwback to 1849, at the end of the revolution against the Habsburgs, when 13 Hungarian martyrs were hanged as Austrian soldiers drank beer and clinked glasses. Hungarians vowed not to clink beer glasses for 150 years and some still observe the tradition.
All group meals in Thailand are shared; don’t plan to order your own food. Per custom, the senior ladies at the table will pick and choose dishes to fit the group.
When clinking glasses in Germany, it’s customary to make eye contact with everyone at the table individually. Failing to do so can bring seven years of bad luck in the bedroom.
Tipping is not customary in Japan and can even be seen as disrespectful. The Japanese believe that good service should be the standard, not an extra incentive.If you want to express your gratitude, you can bow, pay them compliments or keep it simple and just say thank you.
In South India, you shouldn't even touch the plate with your left hand while eating. Eat with your left is considered disrespectful and unhygienic. As a rule of thumb, make sure not to have any food touch your palms, and do not put your fingers into your mouth. Instead, use your thumb to push the food into your mouth.