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Transcript

Insane Asylum

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Escape the

You open your eyes and, suddenly, it's the late 19th century. You have been misdiagnosed with hysteria and dragged off to an insane asylum. After a week here you've realized that the food is terrible and there's the constant threat of electric shock therapy and lobotomies. You've told everyone that will listen that you don't belong here, but no one believes you're sane! You'll have to escape! Are you ready!?

Introduction

Explore the your room to find items for your inventory that will allow you to escape!

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Electroconvulsive Shock Therapy

The nineteenth-century brought ideas about the care and treatment of the mentally ill. These ideas, soon to be called “moral treatment,” promised a cure for mental illnesses to those who sought treatment in a very new kind of institution—an “asylum.” Go through and read about each one before moving on.

Excruciating Therapies

Insulin Shock

The History of the

Lobotomies

Hydrotherapy

Psychiatric Medications

Exposing patients to baths or showers of warm water for an extended period of time

Excruciating Therapies 01

Insulin Therapy

Hydrotherapy

Lobotomy

A therapy that involves sending an electric current through a patient

Insulin Therapy

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ECT

Trephination

Excruciating Therapies 02

A therapy that consists of severing connections in the brain is called

Trephination

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Hydrotherapy

Lobotomy

Excruciating Therapies 03

A Therapy that involved opening a hole in the skull was called

Insulin Therapy

Trephination

Lobotomy

Excruciating Therapies 04

You took a wrong turn through the hallway, try again.

Find the key to your room to continue

00:30

Continue exploring your room to find the items you need to escape.

Inventory

It's too dark...

Inventario abierto...

Continual feelings of worry, anxiety, physical tension, and irritability across many areas of life functioning is called...

Obsessive compulsive disorder

Generalized anxiety disorder [gad]

01

Panic Disorder

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

Panic Disorder

Victims of traumatic events experience the original event in the form of dreams or flashbacks, causing tense anxiety, panic attacks, nightmares, sweating, and more dreadful symptoms.

03

Major Depressive Disorder

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Bipolar Disorder

Eating disorders

Body Dysmorphia: Preoccupation with imagined defect in physical appearance "imagined ugliness are associate with...

04

Mood Disorders

Personality Disorders

Eating Disorders

Somatic Disorders

Group of disorders when general emotional state or mood is distorted or inconsistent with your circumstances and interferes with your ability to function.

You found asecret message

♪♬ø

Next

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ø

01

...Keep playing

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...One more

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You found a new item for your inventory

Click here

Inventory

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Continue exploring the asylum to find a way out!

Inventario abierto...

Use the magnifying glass to find the code and then insert it into the typewriter.

224

Someone is there!

Big Players Famous PeopleGo through each one before moving on.

Player 01

Nelly Bly

Player 03

Wilhelm Wundt

Player 04

Margaret Floy Washburn

Player 05

Emil Kraepelin

Player 02

Sigmung Freud

(born Elizabeth Jane Cochran; May 5, 1864 – January 27, 1922), better known by her pen name Nellie Bly, was an American journalist, who was widely known for 10 Days in a Madhouse an exposé in which she worked undercover to report on a mental institution from within. She was a pioneer in her field and launched a new kind of investigative journalism.

CHARACTER 01

Big Players Nelly Bly

His analysis of dreams as wish-fulfilments provided him with models for the clinical analysis of symptom formation and the underlying mechanisms of repression.On this basis Freud elaborated his theory of the unconscious and went on to develop a model of psychic structure comprising id, ego and super-ego.[9]

CHARACTER 02

Big Players Sigmund Freud

was a German physiologist, philosopher, and professor, and often called "the father of modern psychology. "Wundt, who distinguished psychology as a science from philosophy and biology, was the first person ever to call himself a psychologist.

Big Players Wilhelm Wundt

was a leading American psychologist in the early 20th century, was best known for her experimental work in animal behavior and motor theory development. She was the first woman to be granted a PhD in psychology (1894)

Big Players Margaret Floy Washburn

was a German psychiatrist. The Encyclopedia of Psychology identifies him as the founder of modern scientific psychiatry, psychopharmacology and psychiatric genetics.Kraepelin believed the chief origin of psychiatric disease to be biological and genetic malfunction, instead of Spiritual.

Big Players Emil Kraepelin

Which of these people wrote the book "Ten days in a Mad-House"?

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Emil Kraepelin

Nelly Bly

Margaret Floy Washburn

Sigmund Freud

William Wundt

This persons theory included the id, ego, and superego.

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Emil Kraepelin

Sigmund Freud

Margaret Floy Washburn

Nelly Bly

William Wundt

This was the first woman to receive a doctorates degree in Psychiatry

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Emil Kraepelin

MargaretFloy Washburn

Nelly Bly

Sigmund Freud

William Wundt

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A briefcase appeared. It contains all of any record that you were ever here! Grab it!

congratulations

You've recovered all of the items that you need to escape the Asylum! Some we not so lucky!

You will lose all the progress so far...

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Inventory

Inventory

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Inventory

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Inventory

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Inventory

You took a wrong turn through the hallway, try again.

This therapy proved to be a popular technique. Warm, or more commonly, cold water, allegedly reduced agitation, particularly for those experiencing manic episodes. People were either submerged in a bath for hours at a time, mummified in a wrapped “pack,” or sprayed with a deluge of shockingly cold water in showers. Asylums also relied heavily on mechanical restraints, using straight jackets, manacles, waistcoats, and leather wristlets, sometimes for hours or days at a time. Doctors claimed restraints kept patients safe, but as asylums filled up, the use of physical restraint was more a means of controlling overcrowded institutions.

Hydrotherapy

Brought to the United States by Manfred Sakel, a German neurologist, insulin shock therapy injected high levels of insulin into patients to cause convulsions and a coma. After several hours, the living dead would be revived from the coma, and thought cured of their madness.

Insulin Shock Therapy

Electroconvulsive Shock Therapy

(ECT for short) is a treatment that involves sending an electric current through your brain. This causes a brief surge of electrical activity within your brain (also known as a seizure). The aim is to relieve severe symptoms of some mental health problems.Types of non-convulsive electric shock therapy can be traced back as early as the 1st century A.D., when, according to de Young, “the malaise and headaches of the Roman emperor Claudius were treated by the application of a torpedo fish — better known as an electric ray — on his forehead.” But their heydey in treating mental illness began in 1938.

  • Doctors administered drugs such as opium and morphine, both of which carried side effects and the risk of addiction. Toxic mercury was used to control mania. Barbiturates put patients into a deep sleep thought to improve their madness. Chloral hydrate came of use in the 1950s, but like the drugs before it, it had side effects, including psychotic episodes.

Psychiatric Medications

Around the same time, doctors overseas performed the first lobotomies. The practice was brought to the United States thanks to Walter Freeman, who began experimenting with lobotomies in the mid-1940s, which required damaging neural connections in the prefrontal cortex area of the brain thought to cause mental illness.The problem was, lobotomies didn’t just stop bad behaviors. They damaged people’s memories and personalities, which even Freeman admitted: “Every patient probably loses something by this operation, some spontaneity, some sparkle, some flavor of the personality.”

Lobotomies