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Lily SimmonsICC 620

Professional Journal Article Presentation

Instructional Implications

Conclusion

Results

Method

Research Questions

Literature Review

Article Purpose

Biblographic Information

Table of Contents

Biblographic Information

01

ReferenceMcVee, M., Silvestri, K., Shanahan, L., & English, K. (2017). Productive Communication in an Afterschool Engineering Club with Girls Who are English Language Learners. Theory into Practice, 56(4), 246–254. https://doi.org/10.1080/00405841.2017.1350490

Article Title: Productive Communication in an Afterschool Engineering Club with Girls Who are English Language Learners Authors: Mary McVee, Katarina Silvestri, Lynn Shanahan and Ken EnglishPublication Year: 2017Journal: Theory into Practice

Bibligraphic Information

Article Purpose

02

To see how "key features of the Engineering Design Process intersect with a multimodal model of Productive Communication"

To see how that interaction helps girls who are also ELLs "enact identities as girls and as engineers as they design and build a bridge"

Article Purpose

Literature Review

03

  • Female ELLs
    • likely to be stereotpyed due to their backgrounds
    • less STEM opporunities
      • lower expectations
    • quiet because they're disengaged
What is known about the Engineering Design Process, Productive Communication and Female ELLs?
  • Engineering Design Process
    • brainstorming, designing, building, redesigning and testing
    • "engineers talk, think, write and act like engineers: their language is linked to their identities" (p. 247)
  • Productive Communication
    • more opportunities to construct and share knowledge with others --> engagement in task
    • multimodal communication- gestures, touching an object, eye gaze, body position, object placement

Literature Review

Research Questions

04

How does Emma use productive communication to interact with others and engage in the engineering task?

Research Question

Method

05

*Emma (pink shirt) was the case study

  • 4 Day project
  • 1 hr twice a week
  • Bussing provided- partnership between elementary school and UB

Afterschool Club

  • Field notes/ anecdotals
  • Pictures
  • Questions
  • University at Buffalo (UB) Researchers
  • Emma*, Ameena and Nadiya (4th grade ENL students)

Participants

Observations

Method

Design and build a bridge to solve a local problem - problem relevant to all students- girls enjoy solving problems to help othersThe bridge- avoids traffic backup (health hazard)- allows boats to pass underneathEngineering design processDays 1 and 2- planning and organizingDays 3 and 4- building, redesigning and testing

The Project

Results

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  • experimenting with building materials
  • sketching
  • guide and mentor to Nadiya- verbalization, gestures and manipulation
  • verbally suggesting ways to fix their bridge
  • demonstrating ideas using the materials
  • encouraged Nadiya to participate
  • completed bridge to test

Day 4

  • handed materials to prompt Ameena to describe their project
  • shifting gaze between speaker and materials
  • manipulating materials to communicate a problem
  • finishing sentences

Day 3

  • most verbal communication
  • expressed disagreement or correction with Ameena
  • responded to Ameenas questions
  • lots of gesturing, sketching, analyzing sketches and manipulating materials

Day 2

Day 1

Question: How does Emma use productive communication to interact with others and engage in the engineering task?
  • Emma's contributions were valued by others
    • effective problem-solving and collaboration
  • Mentored and encouraged Nadiya
  • Less verbal communication than Ameena
  • Lots of multimodal communication- especially by manipulating materials, drawing and gesturing

Results

Results

Results

Conclusions

07

Productive communication allows us to "to see these girls as effective communicators because it foregrounds the important of making space for all contributions and the multimodal nature of communication." (p. 252)

"Emma actively took up opportunities to engage with engineering projects." (p. 252).

The girls "communicated effectively in ways that reflect the spirit of an engineering design team" (p.252).

productive communication was used to interact with others

productive communication was used to engage in the task

"Emma was the linchpin of the group-identifying problems through quiet experimentation, acting as a catalyst for design changes, and providing mentorship for Nadiya throughout the process." (p. 252).

Conclusions

Instructional Implications

08

Present ELLs with real world, and relevant problems

Confront implicit bias and encourage students to embrace their identities

Create opportunities for marginalized ELLs to engage in activities they may otherwise miss

Create opporunities for ELLs to work in shared activities to encourage productive communication

Observe and take notes on what forms of communication ELLs use

Have multimodal forms of communication in the classroom for ELLs (especially for girls)

How can ESL teachers use this information?

Instructional Implications