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Transcript

SLP

SErvice learning project

Cindy GarrettEDRG 602Regis University3/8/24

LIBRARY LESSONS

index

7. References

6. 5th-6th grade lesson

5. 4th Grade lesson

4. 3rd grade lesson

3. 2nd grade lesson

2. K-1st grade lesson

1. Proposal

index

Regis Values

Rationale

Proposal

Create a lesson plan for each grade level (k-6) for use in the library. Lessons will be based on Colorado state standards for reading and writing and will incorporate research-based practices learned in this and other Regis master’s classes. Any handouts will be provided and chosen texts will be ones that are available in or easily acquired by elementary libraries in Douglas County. Lessons will be shared with elementary librarians during the February 16th professional development session for feedback. Lessons will be revised as needed, and completed plans will be shared with the District Library Media Center (DLMC) to be posted online for use by elementary librarians throughout the school district.

Library Lessons

Proposal

K-1st

In this lesson, the librarian introduces four sentence types (statement, question, exclamation, and command) and has students practice generating sentences with a wordless picture book.

4 Sentence Types

The Process

The Research

The Lesson

K-1st

2nd

In this lesson, the librarian reads two sections of a nonfiction book. Students list details they learned from each section and decide on the main idea of each. The librarian turns the main ideas into topic sentences, then mixes up the details. Students match details to the corresponding topic sentences.

Topic Sentences & Details

The Process

The Research

The Lesson

2nd

3rd

In these lessons, the librarian introduces students to primary sources and leads students through a variety of activities to examine and interpret primary source photographs. Students process what they have learned through a power writing activity.

Primary Sources

The Process

The Research

The Lesson

3rd

4th

In this lesson, the librarian uses a wordless picture book to help students practice summarizing a story.

One Sentence Summary

The Process

The Research

The Lesson

4th

5-6th

In this lesson, the librarian uses a wordless picture book to help students practice summarizing a story and writing complex sentences.

One Sentence Summary

The Process

The Research

The Lesson

5th6th

Eberhardt, N. C. (2019). Syntax: Somewhere between words and text. Perspectives on language and literacy, 45(2), 39-45. Eslwriter. (2015, September 6). Timed repeated writing to build fluency. Eslwriting.org. https://www.eslwriting.org/teach-english-writing-fluency-composition/Hennessy, N. L. (2021). The reading comprehension blueprint: Helping students make meaning from text. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. Hochman, J. C., & Wexler, N. (2017). The writing revolution: A guide to advancing thinking through writing in all subjects and grades. Jossey-Bass.Reutzel, D. R., & Cooter, R. B. (2012). Teaching children to read: The teacher makes the difference (6th ed.). Pearson.

REferences

references

In Douglas County, the requirements for the library specialist position vary widely. No master’s degree in library sciences is required for elementary library specialists, so librarians rely on training and support from the DLMC librarians and fellow colleagues. Some library specialist positions are certified and filled by licensed teachers, while other positions are classified and backgrounds in education range from little or no experience to years of classroom teaching. The structure of and requirements for the position also vary widely throughout the district. Some positions are part-time while others are full-time. Some library specialists see students on a sign-up basis, others see students for regular blocks of time ranging from 30 minutes once a week to longer blocks during a specials rotation. Some librarians perform other jobs at their schools in addition to running the library, coordinating volunteers, providing intervention, teaching technology classes and so on. Some librarians have planning periods in which to develop library lessons, but many do not. Recently the school district has recommended that all library specialists complete READ Act training so school libraries can better support students with literacy development. Many library specialists, especially those with little classroom experience, feel overwhelmed and unsure of how to effectively plan literacy lessons that will fit into their specific library situation. There has been a call to share lessons and ideas so more experienced staff can support their colleagues. District librarians have scheduled in sessions during the February professional development day for library specialists to share ideas. Writing standards- and research-based lesson plans for use in elementary libraries meets a real, immediate need within the school district. This project demonstrates care for the development of the individual, modeling lesson planning and providing support for less experienced library staff. It helps to promote equity by providing researched-based instruction for all students within the district and integrates knowledge gained from Regis coursework.

This project embodies this value by offering support and assistance to less experienced (or busy experienced!) librarians, modeling lesson planning and how to incorporate research-based literacy strategies in the library.

Cura Personalis - Care for the Person

Regis Values

Magis - Striving for Excellence

This project helps to promote excellence by giving library staff access to current research-based literacy practices for use with students in the library.

While Hochman and Wexler's (2017) one sentence summary is a concise way for students to identify the main idea of a text, it can also be used to help students learn to construct complex sentences, which, in turn, helps boost comprehension. After reading a text, students can identify the main subject and verb, then use questions designed to expand the subject (how many, which one, what kind) and questions designed to expand the predicate (when, where, how, and why) to flesh out the main idea. Students can then work to combine the information into a complex sentence (Eberhardt, 2019). This strategy works well for older students in the library as it can turn a simple read-aloud into a thought-provoking and challenging activity.

"Through this kind of content-oriented application ofgrammar, students experience and practice the reciprocalcognitive processes common to reading and writing. . . . Through repeated experiences suchas this, students develop increased discipline and tolerance forthe rigorous thinking that is required to understand complextext."(Eberhardt, 2019, a Reciprocal Process section, para. 6)

Hochman and Wexler's (2017) one sentence summary is a concise way for students to identify the main idea of a text. After reading a text, students fill in a summary sentence outline answering the questions who, (did) what, when, where, why, and how. Then students combine the information into one detailed sentence. This activity works well for use in the library as it can be applied to any read-aloud text, requires few materials, and can be completed in a relatively short space of time as a whole group, in pairs, or individually.

Practicing summarizing:

  • "Boosts comprehension
  • Helps generate concise and accurate responses to questions
  • Maintains focus on the main idea and supporting details
  • Teaches paraphrasing techniques
  • Enhances the ability to analyze information
  • Develops the ability to make generalizations
  • Aids in retaining information"
(Hochman & Wexler, 2017, p. 139)

Reading and writing have a reciprocal relationship. The study of sentence types is no exception. Concepts of print such as book handling, letter and word recognition, directionality, punctuation, and more, "are an essential part of early reading development for many beginning readers" (Reutzel & Cooter, 2012, p. 94). Understanding that "punctuation carries meaning" (Reutzel & Cooter, 2012, p. 105) helps readers understand the author's purpose for a particular sentence. Is someone asking a question, making a statement, showing strong emotion? Punctuation helps readers better comprehend text and read more fluently. Good readers know that a period signals a longer pause, that voices often go up at the end of a question, and that exclamation marks signal excitement which may mean your voice gets louder. For writing, understanding the four main sentence types helps students use punctuation effectively in their own writing, introduces students to asking questions, and provides students a way to vary the sentence structure in their own compositions (Hochman & Wexler, 2017). Working on activities at the sentence level with kindergarten and first graders can help them move "from writing the way they speak to using the structures of written language" (Hochman & Wexler, 2017, p. 24). Sentence level activities can also be quick and easily integrated into any topic which makes them an ideal focus for librarians who have limited amounts of time with groups of children.

For librarians, this is a quick and informal way to have students process their learning, and for librarians to see what a student remembers about a topic. This activity is well suited for use in the library as it doesn't require special expertise and it fits well into the limited time librarians have with their students.

Power writing is a writing fluency activity in which students are given a writing prompt and one minute in which to write as much as they can on the topic. The activity is repeated for a total of three times. Students count the number of words written each time and plot their best score on a graph. Power writing is designed to help students build fluency and automaticity with writing, but it can also be useful in other ways. Reluctant writers can be overwhelmed by the daunting task of writing long pieces. Writing for one minute is less intimidating and can be a good way to begin to build writing stamina. It can also be a good way for students to tap into background knowledge, generate ideas for writing, or quickly assess what they remember about a lesson.

"Power writing takes on one specific objective: developing the ability to produce more output through structured practice involving repeated, timed writing tasks that focus on quantity rather than quality." (elswriter, 2015, para. 1)

Before students can effectively write informational paragraphs and essays, they need to be able to distinguish main ideas from details and understand the concept of a topic sentence. Activities that require students to match details to topic sentences can help students connect details and main ideas and learn to organize and sequence facts and details (Hochman & Wexler, 2017). Librarians often choose to read nonfiction books with their students. It is not too much of a stretch to include discussions about details students hear and ways to determine the main idea. By doing so, librarians not only support students' reading comprehension, but are helping students prepare for more complex writing tasks.

Educators need to "provide multiple opportunities to identify the main idea and details within text. Educators should also consider how to connect writing and comprehension instruction to develop the ability to understand text and effectively communicate ideas in writing." (Hennessy, 2021, p. 132)