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Values-based education

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The EIE explains that value-based education occurs when educational activities are taught that help develop the values and the beginning of a person and to encourage their ability to make decisions and behave ethically.

Values-based education

When the target group is educated about respecting themselves, their competitors, and their sport by competing fairly, or by being honest with their coach about their ability to compete after an injury, or about having integrity and following the rules anti-doping rules even when no one is looking, a values-based education is being taught.

Furthermore, by developing your target group's ability to think critically, solve problems and reflect on their behavior in line with their values, you are also imparting a values-based education.

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Who is value-based education for?

Values-based education is for everyone!

Athletes

Support Staff

Target Groups

General Population

A person's values are influenced by their experiences and interactions, and their values can change throughout their life, so it is important to include a values-based education component for each target group.

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Who is value-based education for?

Values-based education is for everyone!

Athletes

Support Staff

Target Groups

General Population

A person's values are influenced by their experiences and interactions, and their values can change throughout their life, so it is important to include a values-based education component for each target group.

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Identify your values

Describe your values

Integrate your values

How is value-based education implemented?

Examples of values-based education

Click the (+) button to learn more about the steps to implement values-based education.​

Click on the icons to see examples of activities to implement values-based education.

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Very good!

You have reached the end of the lesson. Remember that you can return whenever you need to.See you in the next lesson!

  • Use an email or newsletter to inform interested parties about what has happened in the educational program.
    • Include value statements from participants, this can promote transparency and show how you are living and embodying your values.

Communication campaigns

  • Create a website banner or email signature that explicitly states your values or includes your tagline or a values logo.
  • Communicate with reporters when there is good news to share about your organization, your educational program and your athletes.

If possible, create posters or banners with your slogan or values logo and display them at your outreach booth.

  • Have athletes sign a pledge or oath that promotes their values.
  • Have athletes write what the values mean to them on a banner or digitally on a tablet.

Event-based education

  • Consider the mission and vision of the Organization to which you belong.
  • Identify if the values are aligned with your vision for education.

The organization

To identify values:

The context

Examples of Values

  • Values should reflect the local context.
  • Consider asking for input from interested parties, such as athletes, PAD, and/or the general public.
  • You can take a vote to commit them.

  • Justice
  • Excellence
  • Equality
  • Respect
  • Inclusion
  • Fun
  • Cooperation

  • Friendship
  • Honesty
  • Determination
  • Integrity

Identify the meaning

To describe the values

  • The meaning of values
  • The meaning for athletes
  • The meaning for PADs

Identify the expected impact

  • Describe how people with these values should behave.

EXAMPLE:

  • The Canadian Center for Ethics in Sport (CCES) has a values-based educational program called True Sport.
  • In their program, they have principles that describe the behavioral expectations of athletes based on True Sport values.
  • For example, the principle "Go for it" is an expression of excellence, "Fair play" is an expression of justice, etc.

Muchos de los mismos enfoques que el eLearning y los talleres presenciales pueden ser tomados aquí. Por ejemplo:Definir y describir

  • Consider showing images of athletes demonstrating a value and have participants guess what value is being represented. Or, have the values written with missing letters and have participants fill in the blanks.
  • Have athletes explain what the values mean to them or how they have demonstrated these values in the past, in and out of sport. If your webinar has many participants, consider using a chat feature where participants can type their response and share it with the group digitally.

Webinars

Case studyShow a video or explain a case study and have participants reflect and answer a series of questions. For example, share the story of an athlete who returns from an injury and does not obtain the same results as before the injury. He wants to improve quickly and searches the Internet for supplements that can help him. Ask athletes to answer the following questions:(this can be done verbally or via an online chat feature, which may be more useful for large-scale webinars):▪ How do you think the athlete feels in this situation?▪ Who can they turn to for advice?▪ If it were you, what would be your highest priority? Its performance? Your health? Your reputation?▪ What are the benefits of being honest about an injury and your ability to compete?

Create a story of type "choose your own adventure" in which participants can make decisions for the main character and ultimately determine how the story ends.

Define your values in your eLearning course.

Have participants complete learning tasks in which they must use their critical thinking to resolve a dilemma or ethical situation.

For Example:

  • Show a video in which an injured athlete is approached by a coach who tells him that he must prepare for the next regional event or describe a situation in which an athlete observes a teammate adding a powder to a drink after a session training and insists it helps him maximize his performance. Next, ask participants to put themselves in the athlete's shoes and answer a series of questions, such as:
  • What do you think at that moment?
  • What do you feel at that moment?
  • What would I do next?
  • If you would like more information or advice, who would you contact?

For Example:

  • The story can begin with a scenario that describes an athlete trying to get on his national team but failing to make the podium by one or two places. He has tried to modify his diet, his training regimen and has even changed trainers and is now looking for a new alternative. The story then unfolds with 2 or 3 steps from which the participant can choose to define the future of the main character.
  • Repeat the process until an ending or resolution is reached in which the participant is held accountable for the decisions made.

Name your values and give an example:

Integrate the values

  • It is important to describe, share and promote your values ​​and embody them every day, acting as a role model
  • Make sure you publicize the values on which the educational program is based and model them by promoting them in the educational activities taught.

Includes a values-based education component for each activity:

  • In-person workshops may include discussions where participants and educators can spend time discussing scenarios, sharing examples, and asking questions.
  • They also offer opportunities for games or performances in which values can be demonstrated.

  • Develop a slogan that declares the values you want to promote or indirectly promotes them.

Branding and promotional activities

  • Develop a logo that symbolizes the values you want to promote.

  • Raise awareness and increase excitement around values through a day dedicated to celebrating clean sport.

  • For Example:
    • WADA's motto, "Play True," indirectly promotes the values of integrity, equality, respect, and others associated with the spirit of sportsmanship. This slogan is used in their educational activities, such as outreach.

  • For Example:
    • The Olympic rings represent the Olympic movement which includes the values of excellence, respect and friendship.

  • For Example:
    • Host online contests or giveaways and activities for teams or the general public.

  • Retweet or repost messages from athletes that promote their values.
  • Publish about who you are, your vision and mission, and the values associated with your educational program.
  • Describe how you, as an education leader within your organization, demonstrate those values and how you help others develop positive values.

Social Media

  • Share good news or positive stories about athletes or individuals in your community who demonstrate their values. Once again, you can engage athletes who have participated in your educational program to film short videos or make value statements for later use on social media.

Resolution of dilemmas or ethical situations:o Provides a case study in which an athlete discovers that his teammate is using a banned substance. They know that if they make their concerns known, their teammate and possibly the entire team will face the consequences. Next, ask participants to discuss the case study in small groups and conclude with a larger group discussion in which the educator can prompt reflection using questions such as the following:▪ Think beyond the athlete and your teammates, who else would be affected if the athlete didn't speak up?▪ How would you feel if you found out that this situation was happening on a team you were competing against?Act out situations and act out ethical behavior.o Have athletes role-play a difficult conversation with a coach or medical professional, such as a team doctor. Have them practice honest and respectful communication.

Face-to-face workshops

Debates o Have athletes discuss their opinions on whereabouts responsibility or the principle of strict liability.Gameso Have athletes play a values and continuity game in which they place themselves along a continuum from “agree” to “disagree” to “always, sometimes, never” for a series of statements as:▪Parents are responsible for their children and their children's actions, including decisions regarding medications and supplement use, until the age of 18.▪ Medical professionals must report doping at all times, even if it violates doctor-patient confidentiality.▪ Checks on athletes should be carried out more often.Have the athletes physically move to the place in the room that best contemplates their response. Next, have educators discuss each statement and ask participants to share why they chose to place themselves in that location.