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C1 Level

Determiners and quantifiers

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Contents

WHATEVER / ANYTHING

Contacto

BOTH / BOTH OF / NEITHER / EITHER

MANY / MUCH / SEVERAL

A LOT OF / LOTS OF / A GREAT DEAL OF / PLENTY OF

A LOT / A GREAT DEAL

6

10

7

A LITTLE / LITTLE

8

9

NOT A / NOT ANY / NO / NONE OF

ALL / WHOLE

EACH / EVERY

A FEW / FEW

5

2

3

4

1

ALL / WHOLE

ALL / WHOLE

We use all and whole to refer to a total number or complete set of things in a group.

All the team / the whole team had the flu.

We often use all and the whole with of the.

+ info

We use the whole (of) to refer to complete single things and events.

When you split up things into parts, we use whole or all.

We use the whole of with periods of time to focus on duration.

When we use whole with plural nouns, it means 'complete' or 'entire'.

More info:

All the team / the whole team had the flu.

That child cries all / the whole of the time.

The whole (of the) match was a disappointment.

You don't have to pay the whole (of the) / all the bill.

We spent the whole (of the) summer at home.

  • Whole families normally worked on the land in rural communities. (= entire families).
  • All families normally worked on the land in rural communities. (=each and every family).

ANY / WHATEVER

Not a / not any / no / none of

Any doesn't have a negative meaning on its own. It must be used with a negative word to mean the same as 'no'.

There aren't any cakes left.The children have eaten them all.

+ info

Whatever / anything

We use whatever and anything to mean 'anything I choose'.

I'll eat whatever/anything I want to eat.

+ info

EACH / EVERY

EACH / EVERY

We use the quantifiers each and every with singular nouns to mean 'all'.

There was a party in every street. Each child was given a prize.

We often use every instead of each to talk about times like days, weeks and years.

+ info

We use each when we are only talking about all of two options, meaning the same as both.

More info:

All the team / the whole team had the flu.

We visit our daughter every Christmas.

I have two guitars and each cost me over £1,000.

FEW / LITTLE

A few / few

A few: a small number of.Few: not many.

I have a few ideas (= I have some ideas)I have few ideas (= I don't have many ideas)

A little / little

A little: some, a small amount.Little: not much, almost nothing.

She saves a little money every month.They had little money to spend (not much/almost nothing).

More info:

MANY / MUCH / SEVERAL

Many / much / several

We usually use much and many with questions and negatives.

We use much with singular uncountable nouns and many or several with plural nouns.

+ info

I haven't got much loose change. I've only got a tenner. Are there many campsites near the beach?

  • Is there much youth unemployment in your country?
  • How many people were at the wedding?

A LOT / BOTH

A lot of / lots of / a great deal of / plenty of

These suggest a large quantity or degree of something.

I'm feeling a great deal better, after the holiday.Plenty of young people have recently become vegans.

A lot / a great deal

We can use a lot and a great deal as adverbs, meaning that they modify the verb, not a noun.

He talks a lot but never really says anything important.

Both / both of / either / neither

If we are talking about two people or things, we use these quantifiers.

Both (of) the supermarkets were closed.Neither of the supermarkets was open.

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