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Transcript

Info

Animal FarmByGeorge Orwell

His Life

Plot

Setting

Language

Themes

Style

Characters

Moral

George Orwell

Orwell was born in India in 1903. His father was a minor customs official who made sacrifices to send George to public schools in England. After school he joined the Indian Imperial Police. His experiences there provided material for his first novel, Burmese Days. Later he worked in ill-paid jobs in Paris and London, where he came in contact with the life of the poor people. In this period he disliked colonialism and developed strong left-wing political convictions and when the Spanish Civil War broke out, Orwell joined the Republican side against Franco. In “Homage to Catalonia” Orwell describes the war. During WWII he became a commentator for the BBC. In 1945 Animal Farm was published and gave Orwell international fame. His last book, Ninteen Eighty-Four, was published in 1949 and soon became a bestseller. Orwell died of tuberculosis the following year.

Animal Farm is a novel about a group of animals who take control of the farm they live on. The animals get fed up of their master, Farmer Jones, so they kick him out. Once they are free of the tyrant Jones, life on the farm is good for a while and there is hope for a happier future of less work, better education and more food. However, trouble brews as the pigs, Napoleon and Snowball, fight for the hearts and minds of the other animals on the farm. Napoleon seizes power by force and ends up exploiting the animals just as Farmer Jones had done. The novel ends with the pigs behaving and even dressing like the humans the animals tried to get rid of in the first place.

Plot

The Manor Farm is a small, independent farm somewhere in the English countryside. The name “Manor Farm” tells us that it was once owned by a local aristocrat, the lord of the manor. However, the farm has since come into the hands of Mr. Jones, an unsuccessful, lazy, drunken farmer. Within the novella’s allegory, the Manor Farm represents Russia and also the countries of Europe more generally: places once ruled by aristocrats, now ruled by capitalists, and ripe for a Communist revolution.Small, independent farms are a treasured part of the British national self-image, emblems of the coziness and tranquility of English political life.

Setting

The characters in Animal Farm can be split into three groups - the humans, the pigs and the other animals. The humans are the villains, thoughtless and neglectful. The pigs are scheming, clever and forceful and replace the humans as villains. The other farmyard animals are trusting, passive and hardworking - they are the heroic victims of the novel. Each group represents a different element of the Russian Revolution in 1917.Main Characters:

Characters

  • Old Major
  • Napolean
  • Snowball
  • Boxer

  • Corruption of Power: Animal Farm delves into the inherent dangers of unchecked power and the corrupting influence it can have on individuals and societies.
  • Totalitarianism: The novel explores the rise and consequences of totalitarian regimes, highlighting the erosion of personal freedoms and the manipulation of truth to maintain control.
  • Class Struggle and Inequality: Orwell depicts the struggle between the ruling class and the working class, exposing the exploitation and injustices that often arise from unequal distribution of power and resources.
  • Propaganda and Manipulation: Through the character of Squealer, “Animal Farm” examines the role of propaganda and manipulation in shaping public opinion and justifying the actions of those in power.
  • Betrayal of Ideals: The novel explores the disillusionment that occurs when leaders betray the ideals of a revolution, showcasing the dangers of blind loyalty and the need for vigilance in holding those in power accountable.

Themes

Animal Farm is a very simple novelette written in a formal as well as informal style. The formal style is shown through terse and succinct prose, while informal style creeps in when the animals talk to each other or when the Old Major addresses the animal. The simplicity of language shows its tones changing according to the setting of the novel, from ironic to sarcastic and from simple to rhetorical. However, by the end of the novel, this tone becomes highly ironic.

Style

The language Orwell uses in Animal Farm is simple, clear and accessible. Description and dialogue are kept to a minimum and Orwell avoids sentimentality even the most heart-breaking sections of the text are very direct in style. He focuses on telling the story, allowing the reader to concentrate on the lessons he wants us to learn. Through the pigs, Orwell shows how rhetoric can be a powerful tool of manipulation.

Language

The novel Animal Farm by George Orwell is a beautiful allegory that teaches several essential moral lessons to the reader. Orwell uses animal characters, their actions, and behaviors to deliver valuable lessons that apply to human society. The novel delves into the themes of power, corruption, propaganda, and the human desire to dominate and control others.

Moral