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Modern Slavery Training

What is Modern Slavery?

Modern slavery is a global problem and international crime, affecting millions of people worldwide, including many victims within the UK. Men, women and children of all ages and backgrounds can fall victim to human trafficking, forced labour, domestic servitude or debt bondage. Victims are controlled by force, threats, coercion, abduction, fraud and deception. Any form of ‘consent’ given by a victim in these circumstances is irrelevant – no person can have control over another person by these means. According to the Global Estimates of Modern Slavery (2022), 27.6 million people are trapped in forced labour and 17.3 million are in forced labour exploitation in the private economy. Under UK legislation, all modern slavery offences are punishable by a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.

Modern Slavery Act

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires UK companies to promote ethical business practices and policies that protect workers from being abused and exploited in their own organisations or global supply chains.

Modern Slavery Act

The Act specifically requires all businesses with annual revenues of over £36 million to publish a statement setting out the steps they have taken to ensure there is no modern slavery in our own business or supply chain.

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires UK companies to promote ethical business practices and policies that protect workers from being abused and exploited in their own organisations or global supply chains.

Modern Slavery Act

Betfred are committed to ensuring this is produced annually.

The Act specifically requires all businesses with annual revenues of over £36 million to publish a statement setting out the steps they have taken to ensure there is no modern slavery in our own business or supply chain.

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires UK companies to promote ethical business practices and policies that protect workers from being abused and exploited in their own organisations or global supply chains.

Modern slavery takes many different forms in the UK. The prevalence of different types of modern slavery in the UK will vary by region and change over time, however currently there are four broad ways in which perpetrators may seek to exploit victims.

Labour exploitation - This usually involves unacceptably low pay, poor working conditions or excessive wage deductions, but is not solely about this. In order to constitute modern slavery there will also be some form of coercion meaning that victims cannot freely leave for other employment or exercise choice over their own situation. Where the perpetrator is taking advantage of a child or vulnerable person, an offence can be committed without the element of coercion.

1. Labour Exploitation

Modern slavery takes many different forms in the UK. The prevalence of different types of modern slavery in the UK will vary by region and change over time, however currently there are four broad ways in which perpetrators may seek to exploit victims.

Domestic servitude - Domestic servitude typically involves victims working in a private family home where they are ill treated, humiliated, subjected to unbearable conditions or working hours or made to work for little or no pay. The victim could be used in this way by their own family members or partner. Again, it is very difficult for them to leave, for example because of threats, the perpetrator holding their passport, or using a position of power over the victim.

Labour exploitation - This usually involves unacceptably low pay, poor working conditions or excessive wage deductions, but is not solely about this. In order to constitute modern slavery there will also be some form of coercion meaning that victims cannot freely leave for other employment or exercise choice over their own situation. Where the perpetrator is taking advantage of a child or vulnerable person, an offence can be committed without the element of coercion.

2. Domestic Servitude

1. Labour Exploitation

Modern slavery takes many different forms in the UK. The prevalence of different types of modern slavery in the UK will vary by region and change over time, however currently there are four broad ways in which perpetrators may seek to exploit victims.

Sexual Exploitation - Victims are coerced into sex work or sexually abusive situations. This includes child sexual exploitation. Victims may be brought to the UK on the promise of legitimate employment, or moved around the UK to be sexually exploited. In some cases they may know they will be involved in sex work, but are forced into a type or frequency they did not agree to. Victims are more commonly female but can also be male.

Domestic servitude - Domestic servitude typically involves victims working in a private family home where they are ill treated, humiliated, subjected to unbearable conditions or working hours or made to work for little or no pay. The victim could be used in this way by their own family members or partner. Again, it is very difficult for them to leave, for example because of threats, the perpetrator holding their passport, or using a position of power over the victim.

Labour exploitation - This usually involves unacceptably low pay, poor working conditions or excessive wage deductions, but is not solely about this. In order to constitute modern slavery there will also be some form of coercion meaning that victims cannot freely leave for other employment or exercise choice over their own situation. Where the perpetrator is taking advantage of a child or vulnerable person, an offence can be committed without the element of coercion.

3. Sexual Exploitation

2. Domestic Servitude

1. Labour Exploitation

Modern slavery takes many different forms in the UK. The prevalence of different types of modern slavery in the UK will vary by region and change over time, however currently there are four broad ways in which perpetrators may seek to exploit victims.

Criminal exploitation - Criminal exploitation is the exploitation of a person to commit a crime for someone else’s gain. For example victims could be coerced into shoplifting, pick-pocketing, entering into a sham marriage, benefit fraud, begging or drug cultivation such as cannabis farming. Forced removal and trafficking of human organs is an additional category of modern slavery that occurs globally, however there have been no confirmed cases in the UK.

Sexual Exploitation - Victims are coerced into sex work or sexually abusive situations. This includes child sexual exploitation. Victims may be brought to the UK on the promise of legitimate employment, or moved around the UK to be sexually exploited. In some cases they may know they will be involved in sex work, but are forced into a type or frequency they did not agree to. Victims are more commonly female but can also be male.

Domestic servitude - Domestic servitude typically involves victims working in a private family home where they are ill treated, humiliated, subjected to unbearable conditions or working hours or made to work for little or no pay. The victim could be used in this way by their own family members or partner. Again, it is very difficult for them to leave, for example because of threats, the perpetrator holding their passport, or using a position of power over the victim.

Labour exploitation - This usually involves unacceptably low pay, poor working conditions or excessive wage deductions, but is not solely about this. In order to constitute modern slavery there will also be some form of coercion meaning that victims cannot freely leave for other employment or exercise choice over their own situation. Where the perpetrator is taking advantage of a child or vulnerable person, an offence can be committed without the element of coercion.

3. Sexual Exploitation

2. Domestic Servitude

4. Criminal Exploitation

1. Labour Exploitation

Modern slavery takes many different forms in the UK. The prevalence of different types of modern slavery in the UK will vary by region and change over time, however currently there are four broad ways in which perpetrators may seek to exploit victims.

Victims of modern slavery can be found anywhere. There are certain industries where they are currently more prevalent, such as nail bars, car washes, agriculture and fishing, building sites and the sex industry. Other high risk situations include when there is a need for a sudden injection of workers into the work force, such as seasonal staff or construction for a major event. However victims may also pass through transport hubs, health services and other public places or be found in private homes.

Signs to look out for

There are a number of indicators that can be signs that someone is a victim of modern slavery (hover over the icons below to reveal) None of these indicators in isolation or combination can give you complete certainty, however you do not need to be certain to report your concerns.

Victims of modern slavery can be found anywhere. There are certain industries where they are currently more prevalent, such as nail bars, car washes, agriculture and fishing, building sites and the sex industry. Other high risk situations include when there is a need for a sudden injection of workers into the work force, such as seasonal staff or construction for a major event. However victims may also pass through transport hubs, health services and other public places or be found in private homes.

Signs to look out for

In 2021, three pivotal members of the largest human trafficking ring ever exposed in the UK were convicted of people trafficking offences that involved vulnerable victims being intimidated and exploited, having their wages funnelled in to bank accounts controlled by members of the gang and being paid only paltry sums in return for their labours. Many victims were homeless, vulnerable, and desperate to earn money. They were lured from Poland to the UK with the promise of well-paid jobs and good accommodation, with the hope they could make a better life for their families. These gang members then exploited them by isolating them, housing them in poor of unsanitary accommodation, under constant threat of violence or subjecting them to actual assault, forcing them to work, keeping most of the wages they earned and depriving them of every basic freedom. The victims were also under constant threat of violence or subjected to actual assault.

Real World Case Study

Paul McAnulty from Hope for Justice Charity, said: “Human traffickers profit from misery and desperation, exploiting vulnerabilities in good people. This exploitation is often perpetuated by those who choose to look the other way, fail to live up to their responsibilities or, worse, become actively complicit. Employers, retailers, labour providers, landlords, banks, consumers, all of us owe a duty of care - we must all shine a light on the abhorrent crime of modern slavery.”

In 2021, three pivotal members of the largest human trafficking ring ever exposed in the UK were convicted of people trafficking offences that involved vulnerable victims being intimidated and exploited, having their wages funnelled in to bank accounts controlled by members of the gang and being paid only paltry sums in return for their labours. Many victims were homeless, vulnerable, and desperate to earn money. They were lured from Poland to the UK with the promise of well-paid jobs and good accommodation, with the hope they could make a better life for their families. These gang members then exploited them by isolating them, housing them in poor of unsanitary accommodation, under constant threat of violence or subjecting them to actual assault, forcing them to work, keeping most of the wages they earned and depriving them of every basic freedom. The victims were also under constant threat of violence or subjected to actual assault.

Real World Case Study

All companies, including Betfred, have a duty to ensure that they are not complicit in any act of human slavery or trafficking and that their employment practices do not infringe on human rights. They have a moral responsibility to ensure that their supply chains are free from modern slavery.

How could this effect Betfred?

Due to the nature of our business, we assess ourselves to have a low risk of modern slavery in our business and supply chains however, any department within Betfred that uses a supplier are responsible for making sure that the supplier can provide a copy of their modern slavery statement.

All companies, including Betfred, have a duty to ensure that they are not complicit in any act of human slavery or trafficking and that their employment practices do not infringe on human rights. They have a moral responsibility to ensure that their supply chains are free from modern slavery.

How could this effect Betfred?

Due to the nature of our business, we assess ourselves to have a low risk of modern slavery in our business and supply chains however, any department within Betfred that uses a supplier are responsible for making sure that the supplier can provide a copy of their modern slavery statement.

Our recruitment and people management processes are designed to ensure that all prospective employees are legally entitled to work in the UK and to safeguard employees from any abuse or coercion.

All companies, including Betfred, have a duty to ensure that they are not complicit in any act of human slavery or trafficking and that their employment practices do not infringe on human rights. They have a moral responsibility to ensure that their supply chains are free from modern slavery.

How could this effect Betfred?

Nex

We do not enter into business with any organisation, in the UK or abroad, which knowingly supports or is found to be involved in slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour.

Due to the nature of our business, we assess ourselves to have a low risk of modern slavery in our business and supply chains however, any department within Betfred that uses a supplier are responsible for making sure that the supplier can provide a copy of their modern slavery statement.

Our recruitment and people management processes are designed to ensure that all prospective employees are legally entitled to work in the UK and to safeguard employees from any abuse or coercion.

All companies, including Betfred, have a duty to ensure that they are not complicit in any act of human slavery or trafficking and that their employment practices do not infringe on human rights. They have a moral responsibility to ensure that their supply chains are free from modern slavery.

How could this effect Betfred?

Nex

We do not enter into business with any organisation, in the UK or abroad, which knowingly supports or is found to be involved in slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour.

Due to the nature of our business, we assess ourselves to have a low risk of modern slavery in our business and supply chains however, any department within Betfred that uses a supplier are responsible for making sure that the supplier can provide a copy of their modern slavery statement.

Our recruitment and people management processes are designed to ensure that all prospective employees are legally entitled to work in the UK and to safeguard employees from any abuse or coercion.

To View Betfred’s Modern Slavery Statement, please visit the Legal and Financial section of the Betfred Corporate website.

All companies, including Betfred, have a duty to ensure that they are not complicit in any act of human slavery or trafficking and that their employment practices do not infringe on human rights. They have a moral responsibility to ensure that their supply chains are free from modern slavery.

How could this effect Betfred?

Nex

We do not enter into business with any organisation, in the UK or abroad, which knowingly supports or is found to be involved in slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour.

Due to the nature of our business, we assess ourselves to have a low risk of modern slavery in our business and supply chains however, any department within Betfred that uses a supplier are responsible for making sure that the supplier can provide a copy of their modern slavery statement.

Our recruitment and people management processes are designed to ensure that all prospective employees are legally entitled to work in the UK and to safeguard employees from any abuse or coercion.

To View Betfred’s Modern Slavery Statement, please visit the Legal and Financial section of the Betfred Corporate website.

You can also view other organisations’ modern slavery statements using the below link https://modern-slavery-statement-registry.service.gov.uk/search

All companies, including Betfred, have a duty to ensure that they are not complicit in any act of human slavery or trafficking and that their employment practices do not infringe on human rights. They have a moral responsibility to ensure that their supply chains are free from modern slavery.

How could this effect Betfred?

If you have any suspicions of human trafficking, forced labour or worker exploitation you should report it immediately. You can contact:

  • The Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA) - 0800 432 0804 or 0115 959 7032 (outside office hours)
  • Email: intelligence@gla.gsi.gov.uk
  • The Police - 101, or in the case of an emergency 999
  • Crimestoppers - 0800 555 111
  • UK Slavery Helpline - 0800 012 1700
  • Modern Slavery Human Trafficking Centre – 0844 778 2406

Report it

Thank you for taking the time to complete this training. You should refresh your knowledge on Modern Slavery every 12 months. If you have any further queries please contact a member of your Area Team. Click on the Sign Off button in the Learning Hub below to confirm your understanding of this training.

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