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Transcript

Part 2: Micro Design and Development

Multimedia eLearningCourse: Burnout

It is recommended that you view this presentation in full-screen mode (icon bottom right.)

Start

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GO TO

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Scope

Wireframe

Screenplan

Storyboard

Scope

This page relates to the scope of Module 1 of this Course. Click the icon below for a reminder of the other Modules.

Who is this aimed at?

Why is it included in the Course?

What will be covered?

Back to Menu

Click the icons below for a reminder of some typical learners

Learner Persona 1: Neil

Back to Scope

Click image to expand

Learner Persona 2: Julia

Back to Scope

Click image to expand

Modular Framework

Back to Scope

As with the other elements within the Microdesign section, I found that exploring the Scope really focussed my mind on what benefit the Module in question brings to the overall Course. Along with aspects of the other elements of the design process, Scoping isn’t something I have formally done within any of my previous projects to-date, but I can now definitely see its value. I can especially see how it would help to ensure the content is aligned to the Learning Outcomes, which I’ve found you can easily lose focus of unless you pay sufficient attention. I can also see how it may highlight whether certain Modules or topics that were originally suggested by an SME actually need to be included. From my experience, it is very hard (if not impossible) to convince some SMEs to revise their original concept or structure of a learning experience at a later point in the process. I can also see how it can be used to inform how a learning experience is structured, especially where certain parts may only be relevant to sub-sections of your target audience. All aspects of this particular Course happen to be applicable to all staff members, but if this wasn’t the case then the Scope would assist in planning the flow.

Commentary: Scope

Back to Menu

Wireframe

Navigation (2.0)

Activation (4.0)

Section Menu (5.0)

Next Steps (11.0)

START

Supporting Resources (3.0)

Hook (1.0)

Content (7.2)

Content (8.2)

Content (9.2)

Content (10.2)

Summary (6.4)

Content (6.2)

Summary (7.4)

Summary (8.4)

Summary (9.4)

Case Study Activity (9.3)

Case Study Activity (10.3)

Case Study Activity (6.3)

Case Study Activity (7.3)

Case Study Activity (8.3)

Mini-activity (6.1)

Mini-activity (7.1)

Mini-activity (8.1)

Mini-activity (9.1)

Mini-activity (10.1)

Summary (10.4)

Click the orange icons for information about each part

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Commentary: Wireframe

Back to Menu

Initially, the benefits of producing this document (compared to the others) for this particular Course wasn’t as clear in my mind, mainly because the Course follows a fairly straightforward structure. However, after creating the Wireframe it made the Screenplan and Storyboard sections much easier to create, especially in relation to section and page numbering.As with the Scoping document, I can also see the value of using the Wireframe during pre-development discussions with an SME, as it clearly depicts how their content is actually going to be accessed by learners. I’ve had instances in the past (in the absence of producing a Wireframe) where SMEs are very surprised with how their initial source content ends up being structured. This naturally then increases the chance of change requests and additional development time, as well as potentially a loss of trust from an SME.With reference to Gagne's Nine Steps / Events of Instruction, they have all be considered, albeit not explicity in the Wireframe design:

  • Steps 1, 2 & 3 within the Hook (1.0)
  • Step 4 via the main content (6.2 - 10.2)
  • Step 5 via the Navigation (2.0) and Supporting Resources (3.0) sections
  • Steps 6 & 8 via the Case Study Activities (6.3 - 10.3)
  • Step 7 via feedback provided throughout, primarily via Hook, Activation, Mini-activities and Case Study Activities
  • Step 9 via Next Steps (11.0)

Screenplan

Section: Hook

Title: Your experience of Burnout

Number: 1.1

Back to Menu

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To immediately make the experience personal to learners.It will ask whether they feel they have experienced Burnout themselves.

On-screen text will be used to ask the question and present the options.Three buttons appear as options for learners to click.They will receive different feedback depending on their choice.Image used as background to increase impact and provide visual variety.

Screenplan

Section: Hook

Title: Burnout Statistics

Number: 1.2

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To emphasise the potentially significant impact of Burnout.A number of statistics will be presented to learners via a series of slider-based questions.Learners will be asked to guess the number for each statistic (within the range of the sliders).

Images will take the form of icons related to each statistic (e.g. a pound sign for a statistic about financial impact and a heart for health.)Statistics will be presented showing the impact of Burnout across five key areas.Learners will have one chance at guessing the correct answers, so that their flow isn't interrupted. They will be presented with the correct answers on submission.

Screenplan

Section: Hook

Title: Learning Outcomes

Number: 1.3

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To focus learners attention from the outset on what they will hopefully receive from the learning experience.

On-screen text used to state Learning OutcomesRelevant image shown alongside text.

Screenplan

Section: Navigation

Title: Navigation

Number: 2.0

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To explain the overall structure of the Course and how learners can navigate around it.It will also cover aspects such as the Progress Indicator and how the content will indicate interactive elements where learner intervention is required (e.g. scenarios.)The approximate duration will also be stated, along with the importance of taking breaks at appropriate moments.

On-screen text used to describe structure and navigation.Relevant image (e.g. compass) used as background image.

Screenplan

Section: Activation

Title: Burnout: Definitions

Number: 4.0

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To check exisiting knowledge and confirm some key definitions ahead of the main part of the Course.

The definition of a key term from each of the five Modules will be shown, along with those terms.Learners will have to match what they think are the correct definitions with each term.They will have one attempt at the question and will be presented with the correct answers on submission.

Hover here for Supporting Resources section

As only a limited number of Screenplan pages are required for this submission, I have decided to skip the Supporting Resources section, primarily because it is fairly self-explanatory and not as complex as other sections.

Screenplan

Section: Section Menu

Title: Menu

Number: 5.0

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To act as a transition between each Module and allow learners to easily re-visit Modules they have previously completed.

The on-screen text will confirm that all modules will need to be completed in a linear fashion, but previously completed ones can be re-visited.Relevant images will be used to represent each of the five Modules, with a button below each one that act as navigation triggers.

Screenplan

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Mini-Activity)

Title: Is it Burnout or Stress?

Number: 6.1.1

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To activate the learner's engagement with the subject of what Burnout actually is.

On screen-text will be used to describe a few situations, which are either likely to be Burnout or Stress.Relevant image used as background.Learners will have to click a button next to each description to indicate their answer.All questions will appear on a single page. Learners will have one attempt and will be presented with the correct answers on submission.

Screenplan

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Content)

Title: Difference between Burnout and Stress

Number: 6.2.1

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To highlight the differences between Burnout and Stress, building on the content covered on the previous page.The use of video is designed to make the content more personable. This should be an effective medium due to the emotive nature of the subject.

On screen-text will be used to describe the video.The video will be embedded from an online source and centre-aligned.The rest of the page will be kept clean to maximise learner attention on the video content.

Screenplan

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Content)

Title: Impact of Burnout

Number: 6.2.2

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To highlight what impact Burnout can have on various areas in the Trust, primarily Employees, Managers and Patients.The use of video is designed to make the content more personable. This should be an effective medium due to the emotive nature of the subject.

On screen-text will be used to describe the video.The video will be embedded from an online source and centre-aligned.The rest of the page will be kept clean to maximise learner attention on the video content.

Screenplan

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Content)

Title: Symptoms of Burnout

Number: 6.2.3

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To help the learners identify the common symptoms of Burnout.

A number of common symptoms will be presented via a Carousel, with learners being asked to cycle through them.The label of the symptom will be shown, along with a relevant image.

Screenplan

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Case Study Activity

Title: Case Study 1: What is Burnout?

Number: 6.3.1

Menu

Click here to see where this appears in the Wireframe

Purpose of screen

What elements will be used?

Layout / Design considerations

To show how the topics previously covered in this Module can apply to a realistic situation.It should increase / maintain engagement by asking the learner to decide what path they should take and the implications of their choices.

On-screen text will be used to describe someone who may be showing early signs of Burnout. Relevant image of person next to text.The learner will be asked to choose one of three responses. Specific feedback will be provided based on their choice.They will be informed that they will receive two "stars" for the best response and one "star" for the next best. Their score will be shown at the end and they will have the chance to retry it if they wish.

Commentary: Screenplan

Back to Menu

This was my first experience of putting a Screenplan together and it is definitely something I’m going to try and incorporate into my projects in the future. Whilst our team is trying to discourage this behaviour from SMEs, we still often get “finalised” (from their perspective) content from them at a very early stage, before we’re able to consider design documents like a Screenplan. This unfortunately means these documents have to be created retrospectively, or (if time is tight), not at all. Building a learning experience from the ground up is clearly a better approach and one I hope the operational pressures that our team often experience doesn’t prevent.I can now see that a Screenplan easily allows you to see which components (e.g. video, imagery, interactive elements) you are planning to use and therefore ensures sufficient variety is provided. To-date, I have tended to do a very informal exercise that vaguely equates to a combination of a Screenplan and Storyboard. Via this approach, it is often only when you review the first draft of the content that it becomes apparent more variety is needed, which tends to result in additional development time.

Storyboard

Back to Menu

Font

Colour Scheme

The Inter font should be used throughout, with the following size and formatting applied.

Buttons / Icons

Caption Border Formatting

Sub-heading: Primary colourInstruction: Tertiary colour

Style Guide

All should be 64 x 64 px. Hover over for information.

HEX: #bfbfbfBackground

HEX: #f7f9f9Caption Background

HEX: #32bea6Correct

HEX: #e04f5fIncorrect

HEX: #373e44Page Title / Body Text

HEX: #266aa6Primary / Button

HEX: #389bf2Secondary / Button Hover

HEX: #38bdf2Tertiary / Button Selected

Correct Response: CorrectIncorrect Response: Incorrect

Next

Next (Hover)

Next (Disabled)

Back

Back (Hover)

Back (Disabled)

Return / Hide Layer

Return / Hide Layer (Hover)

Return / Hide Layer (Disabled)

Submit answer

Submit answer (Hover)

Submit answer (Disabled)

Play

Play (Hover)

Correct

Incorrect

More Information

Play (Disabled)

Storyboard

Section: Hook

Title: Your experience of Burnout

Number: 1.1

On-screen text

Image Description

Do you think you have ever experienced Burnout?Feedback Layers -Yes: Sorry to hear that. Whilst it's likely you already have a good awareness of Burnout, hopefully this Course will still be of use.Maybe: OK. Hopefully this Course will give you a better awareness of Burnout and some tools to avoid it in the future.No: That's good to hear. Unfortunately, instances of Burnout in the Trust are increasing, so we hope this will be of use.

Background image of someone looking down / stressed / tired.

Navigation

Development Notes

As this is the initial screen, learners can (and only need to) progress to the next slide.Next button: Screen 1.2 (Burnout Statistics)

Transparency / filter to be applied to background image to make on-screen text legible.Question to have "Instruction" formatting applied.Buttons to appear for "Yes", "Maybe" and "No".Layers related to each of these to be shown on click.Next button to appear on Layers.

Storyboard

On-screen text

The impact of Burnout is significant. Use the sliders below to guess the correct number for each of the statistics shown.1. Percentage of UK workers who say they've experienced at least one characteristic of Burnout.2. Bearning in mind the increase in remote working, the percentage of UK workers who said feeling isolated could cause Burnout.3. Number of UK workers who took time off in 2023 due to Burnout.4. Percentage of staff who are not comfortable in letting their manager know they are struggling.

Navigation

Back button: Screen 1.1 (Your experience of Burnout)Next button: Screen 1.3 (Learning Outcomes)

Section: Hook

Title: Burnout Statistics

Number: 1.2

Image Description

Icons used for the four statistics as follows:1. Stressed / tired2. Remote working / home3. Calendar / lying in bed4. Hiding feelings / not sharing

Development Notes

Question to have "Instruction" formatting applied.Sliders associated with Variables used to capture answers.Correct answers below to be shown after all have been submitted.1. 50%2. 80%3. 10 million4. 35%Next button Disabled at start - becomes active after answers are submitted.

Storyboard

On-screen text

Image Description

On completion of this Course, you will be able to:

  • Differentiate between everyday stress and Burnout.
  • Identify your own triggers of Burnout, as well as those of your closest colleagues.
  • Contrast both internal and external factors that can increase the risk of Burnout and identify how to respond to both types.
  • Employ techniques that will help you reduce the risk of Burnout.
  • Choose the best course of action if you experience Burnout, or see it within your colleagues.

Relevant image (e.g. target / aims) used to the right of on screen text.

Navigation

Development Notes

Back button: Screen 1.2 (Burnout Statistics)Next button: Screen 2.0 (Navigation)

N/A

Section: Hook

Title: Learning Outcomes

Number: 1.3

Storyboard

On-screen text

Image Description

The main way you will need to navigate through this content is by using the Back and Next buttons shown below.Whilst this content does not include a voiceover, there are some parts that involve audio, such as vidoes. These will include captions within them, but if you wish to include audio then please use the controls on your computer / device to turn it on.A Progress Indicator will appear in the top-right corner. Hovering over the light blue part will confirm how far through you are.We expect this Course to take you around 45 minutes to complete. Due to the nature of the content, we encourage you to take regular breaks.

Relevant image (e.g. compass) used as a full-screen background image.

Navigation

Development Notes

Back button: Screen 1.3 (Learning Outcomes)Next button: Screen 3.0 (Suppporting Resources)

Transparency / filter to be applied to background image to make on-screen text legible.Example button and instruction (light blue border) to be shown alongside relevant on-screen text.Captions to appear near relevant elements, with a "Got it" button allowing them to confirm their understanding.

Section: Navigation

Title: Navigation

Number: 2.0

Storyboard

On-screen text

Image Description

The terms on the right will be covered within this Course.Drag and drop the definitions on the left next to the terms on the right.Click here for definitions and terms wording.

Background image of someone experiencing Burnout.

Navigation

Development Notes

Back button: Screen 3.0 (Supporting Resouces)Next button: Screen 5.0 (Menu)

Transparency / filter to be applied to background image or text within objects to make on-screen text legible.Question to have "Instruction" formatting applied.Randomise order of definitions so they don't appear opposite to correct terms.

Section: Activation

Title: Burnout: Definitions

Number: 4.0

Storyboard

On-screen text

Image Description

The core Modules of this Course are shown below. You will need to complete them in the order shown below before being able to progress.

Relevant images used to represent each of the five Modules.

Navigation

Development Notes

Back button: Screen 4.0 (Burnout: Definitions)Next button: Screen 11.0 (Next Steps)Buttons for each of the five Modules:1. What is Burnout? (Screen 6.1.1)2. Triggers of Burnout (Screen 7.1.1)3. Internal and External Factors (Screen 8.1.1)4. Reducing the Risk of Burnout (Screen 9.1.1)5. Responding to Burnout (Screen 10.1.1)

Next button to be Disabled by default. Becomes active when all five Modules have been completed.True / False Variables to be used to track completion of Modules.On-screen text to have "Instruction" formatting applied and appear at top of screen.Images to appear in middle of page, with buttons below.

Section: Section Menu

Title: Menu

Number: 5.0

Storyboard

Image Description

Relevant image (e.g. nurse with head in their hands) used as a full-screen background image.

Development Notes

"Burnout", "Stress" and "Why" buttons to appear next to each description. When either Burnout and Stress button is clicked, changed to Disabled state and also change Why button to normal.Question to have "Instruction" formatting applied.Next button to be Disabled by default. Becomes active when a button for each description has been clicked.Transparency / filter to be applied to background image or text within objects to make on-screen text legible.

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Mini-Activity)

Title: Is it Burnout or Stress?

Number: 6.1.1

On-screen text

Navigation

Back button: Screen 5.0 (Menu)Next button: Screen 6.2.1 (Difference between Burnout and Stress)

Whilst there are many similarities between Burnout and Stress, there are some significant differences.Indicate whether each of the situations below are more likely to be Burnout or Stress. You will then be able to see if you are correct and why.Click here for situations and correct answers.

Storyboard

Image Description

N/A

Development Notes

Use embed code from video below.

On-screen text

Navigation

Back button: Screen 6.1.1 (Is it Burnout or Stress?)Next button: Screen 6.2.2 (Impact of Burnout)

The next two pages will show you videos of people talking about their experience of Burnout.If you have experienced Burnout yourself, especially recently, aspects of these videos may be difficult to watch. If you feel this may impact you, ensure you are in a safe space and have someone to talk to if possible.This video is by a social worker from America called Mary.

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Content)

Title: Difference between Burnout and Stress

Number: 6.2.1

Storyboard

Image Description

N/A

Development Notes

Use embed code from video below.

On-screen text

Navigation

Back button: Screen 6.2.1 (Difference between Burnout and Stress)Next button: Screen 6.2.3 (Symptoms of Burnout)

This video describes how Burnout is increasingly relevant within the NHS and the impact it can have on both staff and patients.

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Content)

Title: Impact of Burnout

Number: 6.2.2

Storyboard

Image Description

Relevant images for each of the labels.

Development Notes

Question to have "Instruction" formatting applied.Alternative arrow buttons (different format to Back and Next buttons) needed to let learner cycle through Carousel.Indicators (small circles) to be included showing where they are in the Carousel.Next button to be Disabled by default. Becomes active when learner reaches end of Carousel.

On-screen text

Navigation

Back button: Screen 6.2.2 (Impact of Burnout)Next button: Screen 6.3.1 (Case Study 1: What is Burnout? Decision Point 1)

There are a number of common symptoms of Burnout. Cycle through the images below to explore these.Labels:- Feeling tired or drained most of the time - Feeling helpless, trapped and/or defeated - Feeling detached/alone in the world - Having a cynical/negative outlook about your work- Increased Self-doubt - Procrastinating and taking longer to get things done - Feeling overwhelmed

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Content)

Title: Symptoms of Burnout

Number: 6.2.3

Storyboard

Image Description

N/A

Development Notes

Buttons containing the three options shown in On-screen text section.Show Good / OK / Bad Feedback Layers when learner clicks the respective button. Next button appears - clicking this will take them to the Decision Point 2 page.Click here for wording that should be used on the Feedback layers.

On-screen text

Navigation

Back button: Screen 6.2.3 (Symptoms of Burnout)Next button: Screen 6.3.2 (Case Study 1: What is Burnout? Decision Point 2) Hidden on base Layer - see Development Notes

Click here for an introduction to this part and the wording for the first decision point.

Section: 1. What is Burnout? (Case Study Activity

Title: Case Study 1: What is Burnout? Decision Point 1

Number: 6.3.1

Menu

Commentary: Storyboard

Back to Menu

As I believe is the case with many others on this Course, my role is effectively a combination of an Instructional Designer and Digital Learning Developer. As such, I’ve never had anyone to hand a Storyboard off to and this was therefore the first time I’ve put one together. However, I can see how creating Storyboards within our small team would allow us to collaborate more (e.g. allow a colleague to develop the content if I was pulled onto another project.) I think it’s crucial to use a suitable tool for Storyboarding. This was my first time using Genially and one of the great features is the ability to add additional content via Windows and to a lesser extent, Tooltips. Without these features, I would have struggled to get all of the content onto a single page (see pages 4.0, 6.1.1 and 6.3.1) without significantly reducing the font size and therefore readability. Whilst the long-standing trend of reducing the number of words on a digital content page should negate this issue to an extent, pages containing interactive elements and customised feedback will naturally still require more space.The omission of a voiceover is a conscious choice. Many of our learners will be accessing this content in an environment where they can't play audio (e.g. clinical areas) and don't have easy access to headphones. The aim is to make the navigation and context of the content simple and intuative, to negate the absence of supporting commentary.

This section of the module will describe someone who may be showing early signs of Burnout. Whilst there isn't ever a "perfect" way to prevent or even identify Burnout, there are some things that can increase your chance of recognising it early on and hopefully stop it from escalating. You will be given three choices at each stage. One choice is the best available, one is OK and another would generally not be a good idea. You'll get two stars for the best choice and one for the next best. Good luck!

Introduction

You work in quite a large team and are usually really active in meetings. Your colleagues value your input due to the passion you have for your job and your experience. However, you have started to notice that you are struggling to focus and contribute during these meetings and your general enthusiam towards your work has decreased over the past couple of weeks. What could you do?1. Nothing. Your colleagues probably thought you were always talking too much before anyway.2. Raise the issue unprompted during the next team meeting.3. Initiate a conversation about how you are feeling with a close colleague who is generally positive about their work.

Decision Point 1

Learning Outcomes

This part of the Course will be mapped to the first Learning Outcome highlighted below.

  • Differentiate between everyday stress and Burnout.
  • Identify your own triggers of Burnout, as well as those of your closest colleagues.
  • Contrast both internal and external factors that can increase the risk of Burnout and identify how to respond to both types.
  • Employ techniques that will help you reduce the risk of Burnout.
  • Choose the best course of action if you experience Burnout, or see it within your colleagues.

Links to key websites and documents will be provided, as well as contact details for the organisation's Occupational Health team.Learners will be encouraged to complete the Course before accessing these, as they are likely to have a better understnding of the subject then. However, as learners will come into this with varying levels of knowledge of Burnout, they will be able to access them if they wish.

Supporting Resources

Mark is usually on top of his to-do list in his role as a Medical Secretary, but due to unexpected sickness in his team he has fallen behind over the past week or so. He is worried about this as he wants to do a good job, but he is still able to carry out the majority of his duties to his usual high standard. He still manages to switch off at the end of the day, although he is quite tired when he gets home.Answer: StressJasmine has recently moved to a new Ward and feels as though she is struggling to adapt to caring for patients with conditions she is less familiar with. She has already developed some strong relationships with colleagues, but is worried she isn't up to their high standards. She does look forward to each day though and knows deep down that things are likely to improve over time.Answer: StressCarlos used to love his job as a Physiotherapist, but has been struggling for a few Months due to increased workload and various changes in senior leadership in his area. Aspects of his job that he used to complete easily have started to become incredibly difficult and his motivation to maintain his high standards has significantly dropped. He feels less connected with his patients and colleagues and doesn't feel like his new manager can help as they don't have a close relationship yet.Answer: Burnout

Situations

In addition to on-screen text and images, there will be a focus on short videos from people talking about their experience of Burnout.In the short-term, these are likely to be sourced externally, but in time the aim is to have the videos feature our own hospital staff.The videos are designed to make the content more personable to learners and avoid it being perceived an abstract concept.

Content

A link back to the Supporting Resources section will also be provided here, as it may be a natural time for some learner's to explore this section.

As there are Summary sections within each module, to avoid repetition and save learners time, an overall Summary section isn't included.This final section will provide key contact details for learners (primarily the Occupational Health team.)It will also advertise some informal Virtual Classroom sessions . To enhance the quality of discussion, completion of this eLearning Course is a prequisite to attending these.

Next Steps

  • Employees
  • Managers
  • Patients

Impact of Burnout

  • Physical
  • Psychological - Work
  • Psychological - Personal

Symptoms of Burnout

Difference between Burnout and Stress

  • Definitions / Examples
  • Duration and Intensity
  • Relationship with anxiety and depression

1. A syndrome conceptualised as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed2. Extreme and persistent tiredness, weakness or exhaustion3. The ability to bounce back from adversity and cope with challenges4. A feeling of unease, such as worry or fear, that can be mild or severe5. The condition of being alone, especially when this makes you feel unhappy

Definitions

1. Burnout2. Fatigue3. Resilience4. Anxiety5. Isolation

Terms

This will take the form of a few questions that touch briefly on a topic from each of the five Modules in turn.This is designed to maintain learner engagement and give them a flavour of some of the things they are going to cover.It will also give them a chance to recognise if the Course was not what they were expecting and exit before they potentially waste their time. We have had feedback from some staff in the past about clarifying this early on.

Activation

The key messages from each Module will be provided here.Learners will also have the opportunity to review the Module again if they wish.Providing the salient points at the end of each Module, rather than all together at the end, should increase their impact and aid with learning retention.

Summary

These will effectively be the assessment element of the content, where learners can apply the knowledge they have hopefully gained (or already had.)They will take the form of Challenge, Choice, Consequence via a series of questions that aim to simulate someone's experience of Burnout.They will be incentivised via a simple "star award" system, with learners having the opportunity to go back and improve their score if they wish.

Case Study Activities

Once the learner has completed the final Module, they can progress to the final section.

This will act as the transition between each of the Modules.Whilst non-linear eLearning courses can increase learner engagement and give them a sense of control, the nature of this subject means this will be structured in a linear fashion.It has been agreed with the SME that this approach will maximise learning transfer and ensure foundation content is covered before more in-depth and practical topics are covered.

Section Menu

These are designed to activate the learner's engagement with the particular topics included in each Module.They will allow learners to check their knowledge level before accessing the core content of each Module.Feedback will be provided immediately to ensure they understand whether their responses were correct.

Mini-Activities

This would probably be the best option. You can do this in a safe environment and are more likely to receive a constructive and supportive response from this type of colleague.

Good: Initiate a conversation about how you are feeling with a close colleague who is generally positive about their work.

Although this is probably better than not addressing the issue at all, mentioning it during a large team meeting may not be suitable. This will obviously depend on the dynamics of the team meeting and your relationship with those involved, but it is generally better to raise any initial concerns with one or two close colleague in a more private setting. You are generally more likely to receive better quality advice and support in a safer environment from those who know you better.

OK: Raise the issue unprompted during the next team meeting.

As this is a noticeable change in your behaviour and engagement with your work, ignoring it will increase the chance of it escalating in the future. It may well be nothing, but generally there isn't much harm in having a conversation with trusted colleagues. Also, as with other aspects of mental health, beware of making assumptons (in this case, annoying your colleagues) that don't have any evidence to back them up. This can be something your mind does when it's under increased pressure.

Bad: Nothing. Your colleagues probably thought you were always talking too much before anyway.

Learning Outcomes will also be covered within this section to focus learners from the outset. Covering them at a later point may diminish their impact.

The learner will immediately be asked whether they feel they have experienced Burnout in the past. This is designed to capture their attention from the very start and make them feel that the content may be beneficial to them.Depending on their answer, they will receive different feedback (e.g. "whilst it sounds like you have unfortunately experienced Burnout in the past, we hope this content will provide you with some useful tools.")They will then be asked to interact with some statistics about the impact of Burnout.

Hook

As with the whole Course, this Module is aimed at all staff (clinical and non-clinical) who work in our hospital.Whilst other Modules within the Course will offer targeted content based on role, the more generic nature of this introduction module means all learners will access the same content.However, the content will use examples from a wide range of roles to engage all learners and emphasise that it is relevant to them. We don't want non-clincal staff to think that this is only likely to impact patient-facing staff, as adminstrative staff especially actually have a high exposure to Burnout.

Target Audience

It will also give an indication about roughly how long the Course should take them and that regular breaks are encouraged. This is due to managing cognitive load, maintaining attention and also because of the potentially emotive nature of some of the content.

This screen will serve a dual purpose.In addition to explaining how the learner can interact with the content (e.g. Navigation buttons), it will outline the overall structure of the Course.Learners will be informed that whilst there is a transition (menu) screen, the various Modules will be delivered in a linear fashion. It will explain that they can easily re-visit any Module they have previously completed though.

Navigation