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Transcript

STUDENT'S BOOKLET

ADVANCED PHASE

Index

Unit 1

Bands and fans

Unit 2

Relative values

Revision

Units 1 and 2

Unit 3

Things that matter

Unit 4

Forces of nature

Revision

Unit 5

Eat your heart out

Unit 6

In the spotlight

Revision

Unit 7

A place to live

Unit 8

Moving on

Revision

Units 7 and 8

Unit 9

Lucky break?

Unit 10

Friends for life

Revision

Unit 11

Nothing to fear but fear

Unit 12

Crime scene

Revision

Units 3 and 4

Units 5 and 6

Units 9 and 10

Units 11 and 12

1

START

Bands and fans

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary

IV. Speaking 2

V. Practice

VI. Speaking 3

VII. Illustrations

What are the advantages and disadvantages of having two jobs?

II. Pia is a personal assistant in a marketing agency and is going to start a new job as a singer in a pub. Her colleagues are talking about her. How do they feel about the news?

A: I was delighted to find out that Pia got a job as a singer in a pub. It was music to my ears! She’s always wanted to have her own band. B: Oh, yes. However, she will need a lot of energy with her job at the office and this new job. A: I don’t think that will be a problem. She’s always been as fit as a fiddle. She’s always eating healthily and does exercise every week. C: Have you heard the news? Pia is having her first concert on Friday. D: Who? C: Pia, Laura’s personal assistant. D: Her name rings a bell, but I can’t remember her very well. C: Come on! She is the one who is always talking about music, rock bands and all that jazz. E: So, what did Laura say about Pia’s new job? F: She was a bit upset at first, but when Pia explained that it was a weekend job and that this new job will allow her to make new contacts for the agency, she changed her tune. E: Well, let’s hope Pia can handle both things. F: If she makes a mistake, she will have to face the music. Laura is very exigent.

III. Underline the idioms in the conversations in the first exercise. Can you work out the meaning from the context?

To be music to your ears

To be as fit as a fiddle

(Something) rings a bell

To change your tune

All that jazz

To face the music

Something you are pleased to hear about

To be healthy and strong

To sound familiar

and other similar things

To change your opinion completely, especially because you know it will bring you an advantage

To accept criticism or punishment for something you have done

(Something) rings a bell

To face the music

To change your tune

To be as fit as a fiddle

all that jazz

music to your ears

Something sounds familiar

To accept criticism or punishment for something you have done

To change your opinion completely, especially because you know it will bring you an advantage

To be healthy and strong

and other similar things

Something you are pleased to hear about

How do you think Pia got interested in music?

V. Complete the following sentences about Pia and how she got interested in music. Use an idiom from exercise I.

  1. Pia’s family has always been into playing instruments, composing, singing and ……………………………………….
  2. At the age of 6, Pia told her father she wanted to be a singer. It was ………………………………………. as he was a musician and his other children hadn’t shown any interest in music.
  3. When Pia finished school, she told her parents she wanted to be a singer. Her mother didn’t accept this at the beginning, but when Pia explained that she was also going to university, she ……………………………………………………
  4. Pia’s father has worked with famous singers. His name might …………………………………………………… if you know about country music.
  5. Pia knows that a music career is not easy, but she is willing to learn, accept her mistakes and …………………………………. when any problems occur if necessary.

all that jazz.

music to his ears

changed her tune.

ring a bell

face the music

  • Do you know someone who is as fit as a fiddle?
  • When was the last time you received news that was music to your ears?
  • Have you ever changed your tune about something?
  • Think about some situations in which you had to face the music. What happened?

START

Relativevalues

2

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Vocabulary 2

V. Practice

VI. Speaking 2

VII. Illustrations

Would you like to work as a teacher? Why? Why not?

II. Paul is a teacher in a primary school and he is talking about his students. Read what he says and ignore the gaps. What does he say about his students?

“I’ve been a teacher for more than ten years now and even though I love my job, it is quite complicated to deal with so many personalities. I really feel that, in general, my students are as good as (1) …………………………. because they are hard-working and conscientious, but they all have different characteristics. For example, Anne is a (2) …………………. -it-all. She really thinks that her opinions and ideas are the best and is quite reluctant to accept her classmates’ views. On the other hand, Hugo is easy-going and this is why everybody loves him. Unfortunately, I have to admit that he is a (3) ……………………. since he hardly ever does his homework and gets distracted easily in class. Hugo has a friend, Giovanni, who is very hard-working and usually helps Hugo. However, he has problems when socialising. I’d say he’s a lone (4) ………………………, but he can still work on that. Tania is also one of a kind. She is a bundle of (5) ………………. and everybody has fun when she is around. Overall, I’m very happy with my group this year. I’ve had groups that were a real pain in the (6) ………………., but these children are really nice and it’s easy to work with them.”

III. Now complete the gaps with one of these words:

gold

know - neck - layabout - gold - wolf - laughs

IV. Underline the idioms in the text in exercise I. Match up the idioms and the definitions:

know

layabout

wolf

laughs

neck

a. Someone who is really annoying and most people can’t stand

b. Someone who thinks that they know much more than other people

c. Someone who is lazy and avoids responsibility

d. Someone who behaves very well (a child)

e. Someone who is funny and entertaining

f. Someone who likes doing things on their own without other people

a pain in the neck

a know-it-all

a layabout

as good as gold

a bundle of laughs

a lone wolf

When I was at school, there was a boy who was a pain in the neck. He was always bothering me. in the neck. He was always bothering.

I’d say my sister is a bundle of laughs. She is always telling jokes and everybody laughs at them.

V. Think about a person you know who could be described by the idioms. Talk to a partner about them. For example:

1. Do you think that children can be a pain in the neck? Why? 2. Were you as good as gold when you were a child? 3. What do you prefer: working in groups or being a lone wolf? 4. Which of the idioms describe you?

A layabout

A lone wolf

As good as gold

A bundle of laughs

a pain in the neck

a know-it-all

Someone who is lazy and avoids responsibility

Someone who likes doing things on their own without other people

Someone who behaves very well (a child)

Someone who is funny and entertaining

Someone who is really annoying and most people can’t stand

Someone who thinks that they know much more than other people

3

START

Things that matter

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Vocabulary 2

V. Practice

VI. Speaking 2

VII. Speaking 3

VIII. Illustrations

What are the advantages and disadvantages of having your own business?

II. Julio started his own business some years ago. Read about his experience. Was it a good experience? Why?

I wasn’t born with a silver spoon in my mouth. Everything I have now is the result of hard work and this is why after finishing my studies, I got a job in an important transnational company. However, I was very enthusiastic about setting up my own business. My dad and my two brothers encouraged me to do it since they said our family had the Midas touch. As I had always been into technology, I opened a shop that sold all kinds of computer accessories. I had savings from years of work, so I didn’t have to break the bank to start. Two weeks after, I realised that people were not coming to the shop, so I needed to advertise. At the beginning, I thought that distributing some flyers was enough, but I was wrong. I started to get upset because I was spending all my savings on the shop and I was in the red for some months. Fortunately, my brothers told me that nowadays, the way to promote something was through the Internet and they were absolutely right. As soon as I created Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts, my products were selling like hot cakes. Now, I’m earning more money than before, I have two more shops in the city and I’m planning to open a new one very soon.

III. Underline the idioms in the text and try to work out the meaning from the context.

to be in the red

to have the Midas touch

to be born with a silver spoon in the mouth

1. To be always successful

to break the bank

to sell like hot cakes

IV. Match up the idioms and the definitions below.

2. To have a high social position and be rich from birth

3. To cost a lot of money

4. To have financial problems

5. To be bought quickly and in large numbers

V. Julio is giving some tips to set up your own business. Complete the sentences with an appropriate idiom.

  1. It might be useful to get tips from people who have ………………………………. as they can provide you with useful advice.
  2. Your customers need to feel that they don’t have to …………………………………… in order to buy the products you sell.
  3. It might be easier to have your own business if you ……………………………………........ because you probably have money and good contacts.
  4. It doesn’t matter if you don’t have lots of money to start with. Some of the best ideas belonged to people who were ……………………………………. and needed to be creative to pay their bills.
  5. If your idea is good and you enjoy the business you are about to set up, your products will ……………………………………………. Don’t forget to use the Internet to advertise them, though.

the Midas touch

break the bank

were born with a silver spoon in the mouth

in the red

sell like hot cakes

VI. Can you add more tips to the ones Julio gave?

1. Do you think that people need to break the bank to go on holidays?2. Think about products that sell like hot cakes. Why are they so successful?3. If people are in the red, what can they do to get money?4. Do you know anybody that was born with a silver spoon in his/her mouth

to have the Midas touch

to be born with a silver spoon in the mouth

to break the bank

to be in the red

to sell like hot cakes

To be always successful

To have a high social position and be rich from birth

To cost a lot of money

To have financial problems

To be bought quickly and in large numbers

START

Forces of nature

4

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Vocabulary 2

V. Practice

VI. Speaking 2

VII. Illustrations

How do you usually spend your holidays?

II. Look at the posts of people talking about how they prefer to have holidays. Which one do you agree with?

  1. “When I travel, I don’t spend all the money I have. I think it’s good to have fun and get to know other cities, but I’m aware of the fact that it’s necessary to save money for a rainy day”.
  2. “I always travel on my holidays even if I’m a bit under the weather. I just take a pill and continue with my plans”.
  3. “You can’t chase rainbows when planning a holiday. You need to be sure that you will have enough money for the tickets, the food, the tours, etc.”
  4. “I hate spending time with a person who has a face like thunder when I’m supposed to be enjoying myself”.
  5. “Other people might feel on cloud nine when they travel, but I don’t. I prefer staying at home watching series or films”.

To look extremely angry

To save money for a time when it might be unexpectedly needed

To feel ill

To waste your time trying to get something that you can never have

To be extremely happy

1. To save money for a rainy day

III. Can you identify the idioms in the first exercise? Work with a partner and underline them

IV. Work in pairs and try to give a definition

2. To be under the weather

3. To chase rainbows

4. A face like thunder

5. To be on cloud nine

V. Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first one, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words including the word given.

1. You should get health insurance in case you get sick during a trip and have to go to hospital. WEATHER It is advisable to get health insurance if you ………………………………………. in the middle of a trip and have to go to hospital for medical treatment. 2. I’d be delighted if I was given the opportunity to travel for a year. CLOUD If I had the opportunity to travel for a year, I’d …………………………………………. 3. I once travelled with a person who looked extremely angry and I didn’t know how to react. THUNDER I once travelled with a person who …………………………………………… and I didn’t know how to react. 4. I’m the kind of person who likes to save money in case I need it unexpectedly. This is why I don’t travel very much. RAINY I don’t travel very much because I firmly believe you should save ………………………………

feel under the weather

be on cloud nine.

had a face like thunder

money for a rainy day

It is advisable to get health insurance if you feel under the weather in the middle of a trip and have to go to hospital for medical treatment.

If I had the opportunity to travel for a year, I’d be on cloud nine.

I once travelled with a person who had a face like thunder and I didn’t know how to react.

I don’t travel very much because I firmly believe you should save money for a rainy day.

Look at the sentences in exercise V. Which ones are true for you? Can you give more information about what happened?

to save money for a rainy day

to be under the weather

to chase rainbows

a face like thunder

to be on cloud nine

To save money for a time when it might be unexpectedly needed

To feel ill

To waste your time trying to get something that you can never have

To look extremely angry

To be extremely happy

5

START

Eat your heart out

I. Speaking

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary

IV. Practice

V. Speaking

VI. Illustrations

Do you like cooking? Why/ Why not?Is any member of your family keen on cooking?

II. Read five different conversations, in which people are discussing the questions in exercise I. Can you find anything in common with the speakers?

Conversation 1 Sarah: I can cook, but my father likes my sister’s food. He actually likes everything she does. She’s the apple of his eye, his favourite. Tanya: Really? I can’t cook and my siblings can’t either. Conversation 2 Tim: Both my parents like cooking, so I don’t have to learn, I suppose. Paul: I cook at home, but I do it at night because I have to work during the day. You know, I also have to bring home the bacon. Conversation 3 Olga: I once tried to learn to cook and I found it extremely difficult! Edward: Seriously? I think it’s a piece of cake. I even know how to prepare desserts! Conversation 4 Laura: My grandmother knows how to prepare delicious food. She says she will teach me some day. Danna: Lucky you! My grandmother knows a lot of recipes, but she says she will never spill the beans about the ingredients or how to prepare those dishes. Conversation 5 Arthur: I absolutely love cooking. I like creating new dishes with different ingredients. Grazia: I see. Well, cooking isn’t really my cup of tea, but I do it if I have to.

to bring home the bacon

a piece of cake

(not) my cup of tea (mainly used in negative)

the apple of your eye

1. Very easy

to spill the beans

III. Can you identify the idioms in exercise II? Underline them and match them with the definitions below:

2. Something you like

3. The person who you love the most

4. To earn money to live on

5. To revel a secret

IV. Complete the questions below using an idiom from exercise II. Use the appropriate form.

  1. I’m responsible for ………………………… home the ………………………..
  2. Desserts made of chocolates aren’t really my ………………… of …………………… They are too sweet.
  3. Preparing Peruvian food is a …………………….. of …………………… if you have a good recipe.
  4. There is a person in my family who would never ………………… the ……………… about his/ her cooking secrets.
  5. I’m the ……………………………. of my grandparents’ / parents’ …………………. They’re so proud of me.

bringing

cup

piece

spill

bacon

tea

cake

beans

apple

eyes

V. Are the sentences in exercise IV true or false for you? Discuss with a partner.

a piece of cake

(not) my cup of tea

the apple of my eye

to bring home the bacon

to spill the beans

Very easy

Something you like (mainly used in negative)

The person you love the most

To earn money to live on

To reveal a secret

START

In the spotlight

6

I. Speaking

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Vocabulary 2

V. Practice

VI. Illustrations

Would you like to be an actor / actress?Why? Why not?

II. Read five comments from five different actors. Are they talking about a positive or negative aspect or their job? Ignore the gaps at this stage.

1. Peter: We’ve worked very hard to make this play successful, but not many people are coming to the theatre. But it isn’t over until the fat ………………. sings. There must be a way in which we can attract more people.2. Ramona: I love my job, but it is quite difficult when you don’t feel well. For example, I remember that I had a stomachache one afternoon and two hours later, I had to perform in front of a full theatre. You know, the ……………. must go on.3. Joseph: The excitement you feel is indescribable. Even more when you work with a group of people who always say ‘break a …………………….’ before every performance.4. Kate: I worked with another actress in my last play and it was a nightmare. She was always late, didn’t learn her lines and was always in a bad mood. I decided to talk to the director and explained that I was doing my best, but it took two to …………………., so he talked to her and she changed her attitude.5. Ian: It is great to explore new topics, characters and settings. I learnt more on stage than when I was a student. So far, all my plays have lived up to the …………………, so I think I’ve learnt to choose well.

To live up to the hype

It takes two to tango

This isn't over until the fat lady sings.

Break a leg!

The show must go on

lady

show

leg

tango

hype

III. Complete the gaps with one of the words in the box:

IV. Underline the idioms in exercise II and match them with the definitions below.

tango - leg - lady - hype - show

1. Both people in a difficult situation should work together.

2. It is still possible to change a situation for the better.

3. Expression used to wish good luck in a performance

4. Be as good as expected by the public

5. To encourage someone to continue doing what they are doing even if they are experiencing difficulties

We can say “Break a leg!” if we are about to give a presentation to a client at work.

We can say “It isn’t over until the fat lady sings” if we fail a test, but we can still pass a course.

V. Look again at the comments in exercise I. Can you think of a situation in which you can use the idioms?

It takes two to tango

This isn’t over until the fat lady sings

Break a leg!

to live up to the hype

The show must go on

Both people in a difficult situation should work together.

It is still possible to change a situation for the better.

Expression used to wish good luck in a performance.

Be as good as expected by the public

To encourage someone to continue doing what they are doing even if they are experiencing difficulties

7

START

A place to live

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Speaking

IV. Vocabulary

V. Practice

VI. Speaking 2

VII. Illustrations

How do you decide where to travel on holiday? What is the best way to decide where to go on holiday?

IV. Underline the idioms in exercise II and match them with the definitions below.

III. Have you ever had a bad experience when travelling? Tell a partner.

1. To get itchy feet

2. A mile a minute

3. To be in the same boat

4. To hit the road

5. I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.

II. Anna enjoys travelling, but there is one aspect she doesn’t like. Read the extract and identify the aspect she hates and why she hates it.

I usually get itchy feet at the end of the year. Perhaps it is because my job is quite stressful and I need a break to start a new year in the best condition. However, there is one part I really hate about travelling: the airport experience. I just can’t deal with all the procedures because they make me feel nervous and I think they are endless. I don’t know if it is my impression, but I think the staff are always in a hurry, talk a mile a minute and I often get confused about what to do next. Once, I even missed a flight because of an unexpected traffic jam on the way to the airport. There were other passengers who were in the same boat and we had to go to the nearest hotel so we could catch the next plane. On another occasion, I realised I didn’t have my passport when I arrived at the airport. My hotel was very near so I decided to go back. Fortunately, the staff had found it under my bed and I didn’t miss the flight. Now, I check all the documents I need before hitting the road. This year I’m going to Greece and I’m worried because I read a webpage that said that they have the worst airports in the world. But I’ll cross that bridge when I come to it, I guess.

To leave a place or begin a journey

To start to want to travel or do something different

Very quickly

In the same difficult situation as someone else

I will not worry about a possible future problem, but will deal with it if it happens

1. Leave your house early so you don’t have problems at the airport. ROAD To avoid problems at the airport you should ………………………………. early. 2. If you don’t speak the language well, ask people not to speak so fast. MILE Ask people not to ……………………………… if you are going to a country with a language you don’t speak well. 3. Don’t think too much and plan a nice trip if you feel like travelling soon. FEET Plan a nice trip without overthinking it if you ……………………………………. 4. Don’t worry too much about small details as you’ll be able to solve those problems if they appear. BRIDGE Don’t worry too much about small details, you can …………………………………… when you come to it. 5. Don’t panic if your flight is cancelled or delayed as there are many passengers in the same difficult situation as you. BOAT Stay calm if your flight is cancelled or delayed because there are other people who are in …………………………….

V. Anna is now giving some tips for people who like travelling. Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first one, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and five words including the word given.

hit the road

talk a mile a minute

get itchy feet.

cross that bridge

the same boat

Do you agree with the tips given in exercise V? Can you add other ones?

To avoid problems at the airport you should hit the road early.

Ask people not to talk a mile a minute you are going to a country with a language you don’t speak well.

Plan a nice trip without overthinking it if you get itchy feet.

Don’t worry too much about small details, you can cross that bridge when you come to it.

Stay calm if your flight is cancelled or delayed because there are other people who are in the same boat.

To get itchy feet

A mile a minute

To be in the same boat

To hit the road

I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.

To start to want to travel or do something different

Very quickly

In the same difficult situation as someone else

To leave a place or begin a journey

I will not worry about a possible future problem, but will deal with it if it happens.

START

Movingon

8

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading and Speaking

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Practice

V. Speaking 2

VI. Illustrations

Imagine you need to give a presentation about tips for people who are starting work. Discuss what information you could include in your presentation.

III. Try to find one idiom that can replace the underlined words in exercise II.

II. Discuss with a partner if the tips below are good or bad.

1. If you are new, make sure you work extremely hard, so your boss gets a good impression. 2. Be prepared to do the hard or boring part of a job. Don’t complain about it. Remember you are the new one.3. If you go to a social meeting, talk about your job even if the other people are not interested in it. You might get good pieces of advice for the problems you have.4. You might not be convinced about your new job, but you don’t know if you will like it until you start working. You have to take a risk in order to get something good.5. You shouldn’t do more than what is expected from you. Your boss might get used to it and you will have problems afterwards.

talk shop – go the extra mile – do the donkey work – break your back – nothing ventured, nothing gained

break your back

do the donkey work

talk shop

Nothing ventured, nothing gained

go the extra mile

Meg: So, what do you think about this one? Rick: Unfortunately, I think it’s true. When you start working in a company, you must be ready to ……………………………………………. You know, classifying files, preparing coffee, doing the photocopying. Once you get used to it, you’ll do more interesting things. Meg: I think it will depend on your boss. They might want to give you important responsibilities from the word go. Rick: Maybe… What about this one? I don’t think it’s a good idea. Meg: I couldn’t agree more! You go out to relax, not to ………………………………. and stress other people out with your problems at work. Rick: Totally. Look at this one. I’m not sure. I guess they have a point. At first, you might do your best at work but then you might start behaving normally and your boss could think it is because you are becoming lazy. Meg: I disagree. I believe everyone should always ……………………………………. If you don’t, it’s because you don’t really like what you are doing. Rick: You’re probably right. This one is the opposite, I think. I guess it’s a good tip if we consider what you’ve just said. Meg: Sure. But don’t get me wrong. Doing your best doesn’t mean you have to …………………………………… and do things such as working long hours or taking work home. You must be aware of the limit between your job and your personal life. Rick: That’s true. Well, this is the last one. I’m not sure, I have to say. If you aren’t sure about a job offer, why would you take it? Meg: To get experience, maybe something better will appear in the future. For example, I started as an assistant and now I’m the supervisor. If I had not taken the risk, I wouldn’t have got this opportunity. You know, ………………………………………. ………….. Rick: You’re right!

IV. Read the conversation between two students who are discussing how effective the tips in exercise II are. Complete the gaps with an idiom in the correct form.

do the donkey work

talk shop

go the extra mile

break your back

nothing ventured, nothing gained.

  • Would you be willing to do the donkey work in a new job for a while? Why/ Why not?
  • Do you really believe in the saying “Nothing ventured, nothing gained”?
  • Do you know anyone who usually talks shop? How do you feel about it?
  • Do you always break your back at school / university / work / language school?

to break your back

to do the donkey work

to talk shop

Nothing ventured, nothing gained

to go the extra mile

To work extremely hard

To do the hard or boring part of a job

To talk about your job

You have to take a risk in order to get something good.

To do more than what is expected from you

9

START

Luckybreak?

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Speaking 2

IV. Vocabulary

V. Speaking 3

VI. Illustrations

What is the best decision you have made so far? Tell a partner.

IV. Can you identify the idioms in exercise II? Work with a partner and match them with the definitions below:

II. Read about five people who are talking about a decision they made at some point in their lives. Were they good or bad decisions? Why?

1. Marina: “Some years ago, I had the opportunity to study abroad for a year, but I was engaged at that time and I turned the offer down. Two months later, my boyfriend broke up with me. I guess I missed the opportunity, but I hope to get a second bite at the cherry someday.” 2. Helen: “My husband and I decided to resign from our jobs and start up our own business. We were very successful and some friends said that it was a stroke of luck. I think those comments were unfair because we invested a lot of time and money in the business.”3. Paul: “Five years ago I was going to get married, but I had doubts and decided to call off the wedding and end my relationship. Two years later, I realised I missed my ex-girlfriend and I contacted her. I was very surprised to see that she was married and pregnant. It was difficult for me to accept that, but I knew that that ship had sailed.”4. Daniel: “I had an excellent job with great working conditions and a good salary when I was offered another one which seemed to be better. I was on the fence for months until I finally made a decision: I left my job to take on a new challenge. I’m now the manager of the company I currently work for and I have more benefits than before.”5. Ian: “I decided to go to Paris and surprise my aunt who lives there. I didn’t tell her anything but I was planning to stay with her because she always puts me up. When I arrived there, I was shocked to discover that she had had the same idea and had travelled to the States to surprise me. It was the only thing that could have gone wrong and it happened. Murphy’s law, I guess.”

1. That opportunity has passed

2. To be the result of chance

on the fence

3. To have another opportunity to do something

that ship has sailed

a stroke of luck

to get a second bite at the cherry

Murphy’s law

4. To be indecisive

III. Discuss together which was the most difficult situation and why

5. The principle that if it is possible for something to go wrong, it will go wrong.

  1. Tell the group if you have ever been on the fence. What decision did you have to make?
  2. Have you ever been in a situation in which you said “that ship has sailed”? What happened?
  3. Can you give examples of Murphy’s law in people’s everyday lives?
  4. Is there any situation in which you would like to get a second bite at the cherry?
  5. Do you believe that some important events can be the result of a stroke of luck? Why? Why not?

that ship has sailed

a stroke of luck

to get a second bite at the cherry

on the fence

Murphy’s law

That opportunity has passed

To be the result of chance

To have another opportunity to do something

To be indecisive

The principle that if it is possible for something to go wrong, it will go wrong.

START

Friends for life

10

I. Speaking

II. Reading and Speaking

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Vocabulary 2

V. Practice

VI. Speaking

VII. Illustrations

Do you think people usually meet their best friends when they’re at school? Why / Why not?

I was new in town and it was my first day at school. I remember that I was upset because everything was new, but I had had to move because my father had got a new job and my mother and I went with him. I had nobody to talk to about this nor a shoulder to cry (1) ……........… since I was an only child and didn’t have close friends in my previous school. Anyway, I spent my first day at school without talking to anyone and when it was time to go home, I found myself in the middle of the street trying to figure out my way home. I was still thinking about what to do when a girl wearing the same school uniform as me showed up and asked me if I was OK. I recognised her because she was in my class, so I told her what happened and she said she lived in my street. I felt relieved and we started walking together. I don’t know how to explain it, but the two of us hit it (2) ………......… right away. Anna –that was her name- and I had similar interests such as watching romantic films, playing video games, spending time alone and as she was also an only child, we spoke the (3) ……………language. Anna and I are now 25 years old and we’re still best friends. We’ve been through so many things together and I feel she knows me inside (4) ……………………. It is true that even though we have lots of things in common, we are not always (5) ………………… the same wavelength, but it doesn’t mean that we don’t respect each other’s views. It is also true that we don’t speak as often as when we were at school, but thanks to technology, we’re in touch frequently.

II. Clare met her best friend at school and she is talking about it. How did Clare and Anna meet? Ignore the gaps at this stage.

IV. Underline the idioms and infer the meaning from the context.

on

out

off

same

III. Choose the correct option to complete the gaps in exercise II.

1. a) in b) to

c) on d) with

2. a) off b) out

c) along d) ahead

3. a) similar b) same

c) mother d) equal

4. a) up b) down

c) out d) in

5. a) at b) into

c) on d) of

on

I was new in town and it was my first day at school. I remember that I was upset because everything was new, but I had had to move because my father had got a new job and my mother and I went with him. I had nobody to talk to about this nor a shoulder to cry (1) ……........… since I was an only child and didn’t have close friends in my previous school. Anyway, I spent my first day at school without talking to anyone and when it was time to go home, I found myself in the middle of the street trying to figure out my way home. I was still thinking about what to do when a girl wearing the same school uniform as me showed up and asked me if I was OK. I recognised her because she was in my class, so I told her what happened and she said she lived in my street. I felt relieved and we started walking together. I don’t know how to explain it, but the two of us hit it (2) ………......… right away. Anna –that was her name- and I had similar interests such as watching romantic films, playing video games, spending time alone and as she was also an only child, we spoke the (3) ……………language. Anna and I are now 25 years old and we’re still best friends. We’ve been through so many things together and I feel she knows me inside (4) ……………………. It is true that even though we have lots of things in common, we are not always (5) ………………… the same wavelength, but it doesn’t mean that we don’t respect each other’s views. It is also true that we don’t speak as often as when we were at school, but thanks to technology, we’re in touch frequently.

out

off

II. Clare met her best friend at school and she is talking about it. How did Clare and Anna meet? Ignore the gaps at this stage.

IV. Underline the idioms and infer the meaning from the context.

on

on

same

To know everything about something/ someone

Someone who is willing to listen to your problems and give you sympathy and emotional support.

To like someone and be friends immediately

To understand someone because you have the same way of thinking

To think in a similar way

1. A shoulder to cry on

2. To hit it off

3. To speak the same language

4. Inside out

5. To be on the same wavelength

  1. I don’t think we need to like each other from the very beginning. For example, my friend Jair. We didn’t …………………………….………………. immediately, but then we became very good friends.
  2. I think you and your friends generally need to be …………………………………………. in most topics because if you don’t, you might be fighting all the time.
  3. You might feel that someone and you ………………………….…………., but that doesn’t mean you are going to be friends. Friendship is more than similar hobbies or beliefs.
  4. A good friend doesn’t have to be …………………………….……………….. because not everybody has those people skills.
  5. You sometimes think you …………………………………………, but the truth is that people can surprise you rather unpleasantly.

V. Clare’s best friend, Anna, is giving her views on friendship. Complete the gaps with an appropriate idiom.

hit it off

on the same wavelength

speak the same language

a shoulder to cry on

know someone inside out

VI. Do you agree with Anna’s views? Discuss in small groups.

a shoulder to cry on

to hit it off

to speak the same language

to know someone/ something inside out

To be on the same wavelength

Someone who is willing to listen to your problems and give you sympathy and emotional support.

To like someone and be friends immediately

To understand someone because you have the same way of thinking

To know everything about something/ someone

To think in a similar way

START

Nothing to fear but fear

11

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Practice

V. Speaking 2

VI. Illustrations

When do you usually feel afraid or nervous? Do you do anything to stop feeling like this?

II. Read about five people and their experiences. Have you or anyone you know ever had a similar experience? What happened?

1. Lorena: A friend told me that there was a great job opportunity and I decided to give it a go. I went for an interview and they said that I had to wait for two weeks to receive a call. As you can imagine, I held my breath waiting for the final call. In the end, they did call and told me that someone else had been selected for the position. 2. Peter: I visited Peru some years ago and I was delighted by the beauty of the country. But one night a slight earth tremor hit the city I was staying in. It made my blood run cold because I live in an area that is not prone to earthquakes. Fortunately, my wife is Peruvian and she was able to calm me down3. Pia: I’m not the kind of person who is afraid of their own shadow, but when it comes to heights, that’s quite another matter. I wouldn’t do things such as bungee jumping or paragliding. I even rent flats that are on the first or second floor because I just can’t stand high places.4. Kiara: I’ve always been a good student. I always pass my tests with very good marks and I’m also good at writing assignments. However, there is only one thing that makes me feel as if I have butterflies in my stomach: giving presentations. I get very nervous and my hands shake all the time. It’s something I have to work on, I suppose.5. Ignacio: I’m a very quiet person, so I enjoy nice walks and afternoons at home. I suppose that this is why I’m not into speed. The last time I travelled by bus, I had my heart in my mouth because we were going too fast. I actually had to ask the driver to slow down because I thought we were going to crash.

To feel nervous

To wait for something to happen, often feeling anxious

To get frightened

To be easily or constantly nervous or afraid

To feel very nervous or anxious

III. Identify the idioms in exercise II and infer the meaning from the context.

1. To hold your breath

2. To make your blood run cold

3. To be afraid of your own shadow

4. To have butterflies in your stomach

5. To have your heart in your mouth

IV. Look at the first column of the table. Complete the questions with one of the idioms in exercise II.

V. Interview three people. Ask and answer the questions in the chart.

A

B

C

When was the last time you felt …………..…......…… stomach?

Do you know anyone who is ………………...……… shadow?

What makes your blood ………………………..…………?

When was the last time you held…………………….....……?

butterflies in your

afraid of their own

run cold

your breath

to hold your breath

to make your blood run cold

to be afraid of your own shadow

to have butterflies in your stomach

to have your heart in your mouth

to wait for something to happen, often feeling anxious

To get frightened

To be easily or constantly nervous or afraid

To feel nervous

To feel very nervous or anxious

START

Crime scene

12

I. Speaking 1

II. Reading

III. Vocabulary 1

IV. Speaking 2

V. Practice

VI. Speaking 3

VII. Illustrations

Have you read a story about crimes recently? Tell your group.

II. Read the following articles and summarise each story.

1. Paul Smith has been a drug dealer for a couple of years now. In spite of having been accused of committing several crimes, the police haven’t been able to prove he is guilty. He is still free and enjoys quite a luxurious lifestyle. However, everybody agrees that sooner or later, the truth will be revealed and he will get what he deserves because criminals are always punished for their crimes. 2. Many years ago, Argentinians were shocked by the story of a woman called Rachel Winter, who murdered her husband after finding out he had stolen money from her. What shocked everybody was the fact that she apparently killed him without showing any emotion. When the police arrested her, she seemed to be insane as she couldn’t say a word for almost a week. 3. What are the chances of coming across someone in the act of doing something illegal in your own house? Olga Wright had woken up at midnight in order to drink a glass of water when she found a thief inside her flat. Fortunately, the criminal didn’t realise she was there, so she hit him with a vase. The man turned out to be Tim Scott, a famous cat burglar the police hadn’t been able to catch. 4. Danny Morgan had an accident while driving to the south of the city. He was breaking the speed limit and a woman who was crossing the road was injured. When the police arrested him, they found that he had been drinking alcohol. Two months after the accident, the judge punished him severely: he will spend six years in prison because he could have killed someone.

III. Look at the underlined expressions and try to replace them with one of the idioms below. Make changes in the verb form if necessary.

throw the book at someone / crime doesn’t pay / catch someone red-handed / behind bars / in cold blood

crime doesn't pay

in cold blood

threw the book at him

behind bars

catching someone red-handed

Which story did you find the most surprising / disturbing / fair / unfair? Discuss with a partner.

V. Complete the following questions with an appropriate idiom:

  1. Nowadays, many criminals don’t go to prison because the police can’t find the evidence they need. Do you really think that ……………………………………...? Why?
  2. What kind of criminals should spend the rest of their lives ……………………………...? Why?
  3. What would you do if you …………………………………………………?
  4. Have you ever watched a film or read a book about someone who killed another person …………………………………………………...? What was it about?
  5. Do you think that judges should …………………………………………. dishonest politicians? Why?

crime doesn't pay

behind bars

were caught red-handed

in cold blood

throw the book at

VI. Work in small groups. Discuss the questions in exercise V.

crime doesn't pay

in cold blood

catching someone red-handed

throw the book at someone

behind bars

criminals are always punished for their crimes

without showing any emotion

coming across someone in the act of doing something illegal

punish someone severely

in prison

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to food.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and direct students' attention to the paragraph and ask them to skim the text to answer the questions given in the instructions. Answer: Anna doesn't like the airport experience because the endless procedures make her nervous.Exercise III: Students discuss the questions in pairs. Give them some thinking time to organise their ideas and, if possible, provide them with an example by sharing a personal experience.Exercise IV: Click on the golden star to reveal the idioms and ask students to discuss the meanings. They should be able to work out the meaning from the context. When checking answers, remember that they might give different definitions, so be ready to write down their own contributions. Click on the 'eye' icons to reveal the answers.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise V: Students read the questions and complete teh gaps with one of idioms studied. Check the answers by clicking on the 'eye' icons that appear next to the sentences.Exercise VI: Click on the golden star to reveal the instructions and organise groups. Monitor the activity and collect answers as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Show the picture and ask students what it illustrates. They should come up with the idea of having two jobs.Click on the image to reveal the question and ask students to discuss it in pairs or small groups. Collect ideas as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

This interactive activity has been designed to provide teachers with a tool to review the idioms taught in Units 11 and 12. You can do this as part of the Review page, after dealing with Unit 12 idioms or when you feel it is relevant to recycle vocabulary.If you have online lessons, this is the link to have access to the interactive quiz:https://app.genial.ly/editor/65a7ea4e547f9e0014205fa7You can also click on the image to go directly to the game. If you have face-to-face lessons, you can send the link via email or you can set this as homework and check it in class.

Notes for Teachers

Students work in groups and discuss the question together. Encourage them to give reasons for their answers and collect answers as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Direct students' attention to the picture on the slide and ask them what they see. They should come up with the idea of a man who is earning money working in his own business. Click on the image to show the question and ask students to discuss it in pairs or small groups. Collect answers as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

This interactive activity has been designed to provide teachers with a tool to review the idioms taught in Units 5 and 6. You can do this as part of the Review page, after dealing with Unit 6 idioms or when you feel it is relevant to recycle vocabulary.If you have online lessons, this is the link to have access to the interactive quiz:https://es.educaplay.com/recursos-educativos/17381132-ad3_idioms.htmlYou can also click on the image to go directly to the game. If you have face-to-face lessons, you can send the link via email or you can set this as homework and check it in class.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and direct students' attention to the five comments. Make sure students know what the comments are about. They skim the texts and answer the questions in the instruction. Answers: 1) bad / 2) good / 3) bad / 4) good / 5) bad Exercise III: In pairs or small groups, students discuss together which was the most difficult situation and why. Collect opinions from some students.Exercise IV: Ask students to try to find and underline the idiom in each comment (click on the grey stars to reveal this). Click on the golden star to reveal exercise IV. Students match the definitions and the idioms. They can compare their ideas in pairs. Check answers as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Students are provided with some time to read the questions and think about their answers.Organise pairs or small groups to discuss the questions and have a discussion as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to look at the picture on the slide and elicit the topic of the lesson (holidays).Click on the picture to reveal the question and ask students to discuss the question in groups or in pairs.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to read the questions and give them some time to think about their answers. Organise pairs or groups for them to discuss the questions and monitor the activity. Check answers as a whole class and give feedback on content and language.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to look at the pictures and elicit the topic of the worksheet (acting, actors, actresses, film, theatre).Click on the images to reveal the question and ask them to discuss the questions in pairs or groups.

Notes for Teachers

Students look at the picture and say how they think the girl in orange is feeling. To exploit the picture in a better way, you could ask what they think it represents (the pictures on the right and left show how the girl really feels. The one in the centre is trying not to show her feelings fully, but it is noticeable that something is going on). Click on the image to reveal the question and ask students to discuss it in pairs or small groups. Collect ideas as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise V: Direct student's attention to the key word transformation exercises and elicit the strategy, if necessary. Give them around 5 minutes to complete the gaps and ask them to compare in pairs. Check answers as a whole class. Click on the 'eye' icons to reveal the answers.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to work.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

This interactive activity has been designed to provide teachers with a tool to review the idioms taught in Units 3 and 4. You can do this as part of the Review page, after dealing with Unit 4 idioms or when you feel it is relevant to recycle vocabulary.If you have online lessons, this is the link to have access to the interactive quiz:https://wordwall.net/play/66153/174/590You can also click on the image to go directly to the game. If you have face-to-face lessons, you can send the link via email or you can set this as homework and check it in class.

Notes for Teachers

Students look at the pictures and identify the activity. You can exploit the picture by asking them what the relationship between the people is and why they think they are cooking together.Click on any image to reveal the question and ask students to discuss it in pairs or small groups. Collect ideas as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise V: Students complete the gaps with one of the idioms individually. Pair them up and ask them to compare their answers. Exercise VI: Students read the views again and think, individually, of their answers. They work in groups to discuss their ideas.

Notes for Teachers

Give students some time to read the questions and think about their answers.Organise pairs or small groups to discuss the questions and have a discussion as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Students read the sentences about how Pia got interested in music and try to complete the gaps with one of the idioms taught. Check the answers by clicking on the 'eye' icons that appear next to the sentences.

Notes for Teachers

Click on the corresponding unit to see the content. We will find a revision exercise (interactive activity) after two units (Revision sections).

Notes for Teachers

Students look at the picture and identify what the young woman is doing. You could ask students to predict what she is talking about, based on the topics discussed in unit 8.Click on the picture to reveal the situation and the discussion. Ask students to work in pairs to discuss their ideas.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms with weather words.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

Students are asked to look at the pictures and to identify the job. Click on any image to reveal the question and ask students to discuss it in pairs or small groups. Collect ideas as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise IV: Ask students to complete the statements with the correct idiom. You can do the first one as an example to make students aware of the fact that they will need to make some changes. Students compare their answers in pairs and then, with the whole class.Exercise V: Students work in groups and tell each other whether the sentences are true or false for them.

Notes for Teachers

Give students some time to read the questions and think about their answers.Organise pairs or small groups to discuss the questions and have a discussion as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms with travelling words.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to friendship.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

This interactive activity has been designed to provide teachers with a tool to review the idioms taught in Units 7 and 8. You can do this as part of the Review page, after dealing with Unit 8 idioms or when you feel it is relevant to recycle vocabulary.If you have online lessons, this is the link to have access to the interactive quiz:https://view.genial.ly/659d8a1e6c59e500139a52fdYou can also click on the image to go directly to the game. If you have face-to-face lessons, you can send the link via email or you can set this as homework and check it in class.

Notes for Teachers

Students look at the picture and identify what the young woman is doing. You could ask students to predict what she is talking about, based on the topics discussed in unit 8.Click on the picture to reveal the situation and the discussion. Ask students to work in pairs to discuss their ideas.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and ask students to read the three conversations about Pia. Ask them to get the main idea by answering the question in the instructions: 'How do they feel about the news?' and ask them not to worry about any unknown expression.Exercise III: Students identify the idioms in the conversations (you might want to remind them of what an idiom is at this stage). Use the stars to reveal the underlined parts. Do some pronunciation practise at word and sentence level.Click on the star at the top of the slide to reveal the idioms and ask students to discuss the meanings by looking at the context of the conversations. Students should be able to explain the idioms in their own words. Use the 'eye' icons to reveal the definitions as you check the answers with the whole group.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Give students some time to read the pieces of advice and let them think to decide if they think the tips are good or bad. Ask them to ignore the underlined words at this stage. After that, pair them up to discuss the suggestions. It might be a good idea to give them some language to agree and disagree (I'm with you / I couldn't agree more / I'm not sure about that / I don't know about that). Collect answers as a whole class.Exercise III: Click on the golden star to reveal Exercise III and ask students to focus on the underlined words in Exercise II. Do number 1 as an example and give them some time to work individually. When they finish, they can compare in pairs and when checking answers, click on the 'eye' icons to reveal them. This would be a good opportunity to practise pronunciation at sentence level.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and ask students to read the five experiences given. Give them a couple of minutes to skim the texts and they could work in pairs to answer the questions. Exercise III: Click on the golden star to reveal the instructions in number three and ask students to underline the idioms in the short texts. Check answers by clicking on the grey stars to reveal where the idioms are and click on the last golden star to reveal the idioms on the slide. When practising pronunciation, you could focus on the intonation these expressions should have as they are related to emotional experiences.Students work individually or in pairs to discuss the meanings. Collect students' ideas and reveal the answers by clicking on the 'eye' icons. Bear in mind that students should explain the idioms in their own words, so the exact words might not appear in the slides.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise IV: Ask students to look at the table and read the questions. Students work individually to complete the gaps with the appropriate idiom. Exercise V: For this activity, in face-to-face lessons, students could stand up and find three people they don't usually work with. Encourage them to ask for more information, so they can report later in class. For online lessons, organise breakout rooms and students talk to each other and take notes of their classmates' answers.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to look at the photograph and think of possible ways of how Pia got interested in music to predict the content of the next exercise. You can ask for an example in order to give them an idea. Suggested answers:- She comes from a family of musicians.- She really admires a famous singer.- Her father/ mother wanted to be a musician, but they couldn't do it.- As a child, a music teacher inspired her.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise V: Students read the sentences about how the tips Julio gives and try to complete the gaps with one of the idioms taught. Check the answers by clicking on the 'eye' icons that appear next to the sentences.Exercise VI: Give students some thinking time and pair them up to discuss the tips they can think of.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to crime.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

To personalise the idioms, students are asked to think of people that can be described by them.Check the examples with them and organise pairs or groups to develop the activity.You might want to add the expression "I don't know anyone who is..." if they cannot think of any examples for some of the idioms.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Give students some time to read the stories and tell them they will report what each story is about in one sentence. They work in pairs to do this and then you can collect answers with the whole class.Exercise III: Click on the golden star to reveal Exercise III and ask students to focus on the underlined words in Exercise II. Do number 1 as an example and give them some time to work individually. When they finish, they can compare in pairs and when checking answers, click on the 'eye' icons to reveal them.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and direct students' attention to the five conversations. They skim the texts to get the general idea and work in pairs to discuss if they found things in common with the people involved in the dialogues.Exercise III: Students identify the idioms in the conversations and underline them. Click on the grey stars to reveal the underlined idioms in the text.Exercise IV: Click on the golden star to reveal the idioms and ask students to match up the meanings with the expressions underlined. Students should be able to get the meaning from the context. Use the 'eye' icons to reveal the idioms as you check the answers with the whole group.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to look at the picture and ask them what is happening. They should come up with the idea of travelling and making decisions when travelling. Click on any image to reveal the questions and ask students to discuss them in pairs or small groups. Collect ideas as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and direct students' attention to the paragraph. Give them some time to skim the text and emphasise they must ignore the gaps. Ask students to answer the questions in the instruction. Answer: she got lost and Anna helped her find her way home.Exercise III: Click on the golden star to reveal Exercise III. Students read the text again and look at the options given in this exercise. They try to complete the gaps with one of the options given. Give them five minutes to do this and you can ask them to compare their answers in pairs. Exercise IV: Click on the golden star to reveal exercise IV. Students underline the idiomatic expressions in the text. Click on the grey stars to check answers.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and ask students to read the paragraph about Paul's students without paying attention to the gaps. They must answer the question in the instructions. Answer: Paul generally likes his group even though they have different personalities.Exercise III: Click on the circle to reveal the instructions and the box with the words. Students are asked to complete the gaps with the words. They should not worry if they are not familiar with the expressions. They can do this in pairs and the teacher checks the answers with the whole group.Exercise IV: Click on the circle to reveal exercise IV and ask students to underline the idioms in exercise I. Do some pronunciation practise at word and sentence level. Check by clicking on the stars at the top of the slide. Click on the golden star to reveal the different definitions and ask students to match up the idioms and the definitions. Check answers with the whole class.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to luck and making decisions.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

Show the picture and ask students what it illustrates. They should come up with the idea of having two jobs.Click on the image to reveal the question and ask students to discuss it in pairs or small groups. Collect ideas as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Students look at the picture and identify what the young woman is doing. You could ask students to predict what she is talking about, based on the topics discussed in unit 8.Click on the picture to reveal the situation and the discussion. Ask students to work in pairs to discuss their ideas.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise IV: Students read the conversation and complete the gaps with the correct idiom. They work individually and then, compare their answers in pairs. Collect answers as a whole class and give appropriate feedback.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and ask students to skim the text about Julio's experience and answer the question in the instruction. Answer: it was a difficult experience at the beginning, but it turned out to be a good one because the business was successful.Exercise III: Students identify the idioms in the paragraph and underline them. Click on the stars to reveal the underlined idioms in the text.Exercise IV: Click on the star at the top of the slide to reveal the idioms and ask students to match up the meanings with the expressions underlined. Students should be able to get the meaning from the context. Use the 'eye' icons to reveal the idioms as you check the answers with the whole group.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to look at the sentences one more time. Give them some time to think about the sentences and whether they agree or disagree with the ideas.Organise small groups for students to discuss their ideas together. They also discuss extra tips they might think of.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context by telling students they will read five different posts about people's opinions regarding how to spend holidays. You can ask them to tick the views they agree with.Exercise III: Students identify the idioms in the posts and underline them. Click on the stars to reveal the underlined idioms in the comments.Exercise IV: Ask students to work in pairs and discuss the meanings of the idioms. They should be able to deduce the meaning from the context.Click on the golden star to reveal the idioms and check answers with the class. Bear in mind that students might give definitions using other words.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise IV: Students work in pair to infer the meaning of the idioms from the context given in the text. Use the 'eye' icons to check answers. Remember that students might come up with their own ways to explain the meanings of the expressions. Practise pronunciation by doing drilling work and focusing on sentence level.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to read the questions and provide them with some thinking time so they can organise their ideas.Students work in small groups to discuss the questions together. Collect ideas as a whole class.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to look at the sentences one more time. Give them some time to think about the sentences and whether they are true for them or not. Students discuss the sentences together in small groups.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to music.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to fear and nervousness.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to money.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

This interactive activity has been designed to provide teachers with a tool to review the idioms taught in Units 3 and 4. You can do this as part of the Review page, after dealing with Unit 4 idioms or when you feel it is relevant to recycle vocabulary.If you have online lessons, this is the link to have access to the interactive quiz:https://wordwall.net/play/66153/174/590You can also click on the image to go directly to the game. If you have face-to-face lessons, you can send the link via email or you can set this as homework and check it in class.

Notes for Teachers

To personalise the idioms, ask students to think of situations in which they can use them.Check the examples with them and organise pairs or groups to develop the activity.

Notes for Teachers

On this slide, you will find pictures that illustrate the idioms, the idiom itself and its definition.You can use this as a revision or at any stage of the lesson to reinforce the meaning of the expressions.The first icon reveals the picture, the second, the idiom and the third, the meaning.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise II: Set the context and direct students' attention to the five conversations. They skim the texts to get the general idea and work in pairs to discuss if they found things in common with the people involved in the dialogues.Exercise III: Students identify the idioms in the conversations and underline them. Click on the grey stars to reveal the underlined idioms in the text.Exercise IV: Click on the golden star to reveal the idioms and ask students to match up the meanings with the expressions underlined. Students should be able to get the meaning from the context. Use the 'eye' icons to reveal the idioms as you check the answers with the whole group.

Notes for Teachers

Ask students to look at the three pictures and elicit the context in which they are: in the first one, they are at school; in the second one, they are at university and, in the last one, they are at work. Ask students what the relationship between the people in each picture is. Click on any of the pictures to reveal the questions. Organise pairs or groups and ask students to discuss their ideas.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms to describe personality.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.

Notes for Teachers

This interactive activity has been designed to provide teachers with a tool to review the idioms taught in Units 1 and 2. You can do this as part of the Review page, after dealing with Unit 2 idioms or when you feel it is relevant to recycle vocabulary.If you have online lessons, this is the link to have access to the interactive quiz:https://quizizz.com/join?gc=94515392 You can also click on the Quizizz logo to go directly to the game. If you have face-to-face lessons, you can send the link via email or you can set this as homework and check it in class.

Notes for Teachers

Exercise V: Direct student's attention to the key word transformation exercises and elicit the strategy, if necessary. Give them around 5 minutes to complete the gaps and ask them to compare in pairs. Check answers as a whole class. Click on the 'eye' icons to reveal the answers.

Notes for Teachers

This worksheet will introduce idioms related to performing arts.This is a summary of the activities we will find in the worksheet. Click on each sub heading to go directly to the activity you want to work with.