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Property-Carrying Vehicles

DOT Driving Essentials

Unit 1

Hours of Service

Unit 2

On-Duty and Off-Duty Time

Unit 3

Hour of Service Limits

Unit 4

Adverse Driving Conditions

Unit 5

Quiz

Test your knowledge

Short-Haul

Unit 6

Driver's Log

Index

Hours of Service

Unit 1

Anyone who drives a truck, or truck-tractor with a trailer that is used on the highways in interstate commerce to transport property and:

The Hours of Service (HOS) rules are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) to ensure the safety and well-being of commercial motor vehicles (CMV) drivers. They stipulate the maximum amount of time drivers can spend both off and on duty to reduce fatigue and maintain safety.

What are Hours of Service (HOS)?

Hours of Service

Unit 1

Who must comply to these regulations?

  • The vehicles weight is (including the load) 10,001 lbs or more
  • The vehicles have a gross weight rating (GWR) or gross combination weight (GCW) of 10,001 lbs or more
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring safety placards.

On-Duty and Off-Duty Time

Unit 2

The DOT has regulations based on how many hours can be worked over a specific period of time. On-Duty Time includes all time you are working or required to be ready to work, for any employer.A 60-hour/7-day limit and 70-hours/8-day limit is implemented.

Time Limits (On-Duty)

On-Duty Time

Unit 2

+INFO

+INFO

+INFO

+INFO

Miscellaneous

Time Inside The Vehicle

Driving Time

Waiting Time

On-Duty Time Limits: Activities considered "On-Duty"

Unit 2

Click on"Info" to learn more

To be considered off-duty, you must be relieved of all duty and responsibility for performing work. You must be free to pursue activities of your own choosing and be able to leave the place where your vehicle is parked.If you are not doing any work (paid or unpaid) for a motor carrier and you are not doing any paid work for anyone else, you may record the time as off-duty time.

What is Off-Duty Time?

Off-Duty Time

Unit 2

Hour of Service Limits

Unit 3

60/70 hour or 70/8-day rule

11-hour driving window

Hour of Service limits

Unit 3

To limit fatigue, there are specific limits on the amount of time you can drive and how many total hours you can work before you are no longer to drive a CMV. You must follow the three maximum duty limits at all times.

14-hour driving window

Click on the hot spots to learn more

1

60 hours / 7 OR 8 days

Your window of time falls into a larger window of time

11 hours

In that window of time, you can only drive a certain amount

14 hours

2

You have a window of time

Putting it all together

Unit 3

70 hours / 8 days

3

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After you have reached the 60- or 70- hour clock calculations, drivers can "restart" their hours by taking 34 or more consecutive hours off duty. After the 34 hours have passed, the driver's hours "reset" back to zero and they are able to drive another 60- or 70- hours.

Interactive step-by-step visual communication:

The restart option

34-hour restart

Adverse Conditions

Unit 4

The adverse driving condition rule allows extend the 14 hour driving window, but it does NOT increase the time limits beyond the current 60 hour/7 days or 70 hours/ 8 days limit.

What the extension does NOT do

If unexpected adverse driving conditions slow you down, you may drive up to 2 additional hours to complete what could have been driven in normal conditions. Adverse driving conditions are any conditions that you could not anticipate. Examples: The highway is blocked by a crash or the sudden appearance of fog.

Additional 2-hours

Adverse Conditions

Unit 4

Short Haul (Information Only)

Unit 5

To qualify as a short-haul driver:

  • Operate within a 150 air-mile radius (172.6 statute miles)
  • Not exceed a maximum duty period of 14 hours
  • Start and end his/her shift in the same location
  • Have at least 10 hours off between shifts
  • Not required to keep a log book

The following information is for informational purposes only. All drivers should follow the Long Haul Rules.

Information Only

Short Haul Exceptions

Daily Drivers Log

Unit 6

The tracking of a driver's HOS limits is normally accomplished using an electronic logging device (ELD). This can also be done in written form.

Tracking

Driver's Daily Log and Electronic Logging Device (ELD)

Unit 6

Example of a written log

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DATE: You must write down the month, day and year for the beginning of the 24-hour period. (Multiple consecutive days off may be combined on one log page, with an explanation in the Remarks.

NAME OF CARRIER: You must write down the name of the motor carrier ( ex. ALS) you are working for.

TRUCK OR TRACTOR AND TRAILER NUMBER: You must write down either the vehicle number(s) assigned by your company, or license number and licensing State for each truck (and trailer, if any) you drove during the 24-hour period.

TOTAL MILES DRIVING TODAY: You must write down the total number of miles you drove during the 24-hour period.

MAIN OFFICE ADDRESS: You must write down your carrier's main office address. The city and State are sufficient.

YOUR SIGNATURE: You must certify that all you entries are true and correct by signing your log with your legal name or name of record.

SHIPPING DOCUMENT NUMBER: For each shipment, you must write down a shipping document number (such as a shipping manifest number) OR the name of the shipper and what you are hauling.

NAME OF CO-DRIVER: You must write down the name of your co-drivers if you have one.

The Graph Grid

An indepth look

You must keep the grid on your log current with your last change of duty status.

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Off Duty: You will draw a solid line between the appropriate time markers to show the periods of time you are off duty.

Sleeper Berth: You will draw a line between the appropriate time markers to show the periods of time you are resting in a sleeper berth. This will not affect any technicians, as none of the trucks have a sleeper berth.

Driving: You will draw a solid line between the appropriate time markers to show the periods of time you are behind the wheel of a CMV in operation.

On-duty (Not Driving): You will draw a solid line between the time markers to show the periods of time when you are on duty, but NOT driving a CMV. Time spent a non-CMV for a carrier would be included here.

The Graph Grid

A day on the road

Here is an example of a day and how the log should be filled out.

Joe reported for work at 6 AM at his home base in Richmond, VA. He helped load, check with dispatch, and did a pre-trip inspection. This is on-duty time.

The Graph Grid

A day on the road

Joe marked midnight to 6 AM as off-duty, then drew a line straight down to the on-duty section and drew a line from 6AM to 7:30 AM.

Richmond, VA

The Graph Grid

A day on the road

After driving 1 1/2 hours, Joe stopped to fuel his truck at 9 AM in Fredericksburg, VA. He marked this time as Driving time. The time at the truck stop (1/2 hour) was marked as On Duty (Not Driving). He was back on the road by 10 AM.

Richmond, VA

Fredericksburg, VA

The Graph Grid

A day on the road

Joe continued driving for 2 1/2 hours until he reached Baltimore to have lunch. His time from leaving Fredericksburg to Baltimore was listed as Driving time. After lunch he recorded his lunch time as Off-Duty since he had instructions from his carrier to log his lunch as off duty and did not have any work responsibilites during this time.

Richmond, VA

Fredericksburg, VA

Baltimore, MD

The Graph Grid

A day on the road

Joe continued driving for 2 1/2 hours until he reached Baltimore to have lunch. His time from leaving Fredericksburg to Baltimore was listed as Driving time. After lunch he recorded his lunch time as Off-Duty since he had instructions from his carrier to log his lunch as off duty and did not have any work responsiblities during this time.

Richmond, VA

Fredericksburg, VA

Baltimore, MD

Phuiladelphia, PA

The Graph Grid

A day on the road

After the delivery in Philadelphia, he continued driving until he reached the Newark, NJ office.

Richmond, VA

Fredericksburg, VA

Baltimore, MD

Phuiladelphia, PA

Newark, NJ

There he dropped of the remaning truck load, completed a [post-trip inspection, finished his log and other paperwork.

He went Off-Duty at 7PM

Finished Log

At the end of the day, Joe's log book should look like this...

(delivery)

Fredericksburg, VA

Baltimore, MD

Philadelphia, PA

Newark, NJ

(gas)

( lunch)

Richmond, VA

Bad traffiic!!

10/13/2024

VA B17 J37

ADvantage Lifts

4222 Clinton Way, Richmond, VA

Joe Dillard

VA B17 J37

3.5

8.5

12

381

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Quiz

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Lesson learned!

Driving Time

ALL driving time, meaning all time spent at the driving controls of a CMV vehicle.

  • All time loading, unloading, supervising, or attending your truck; or handling paperwork for shipments.
  • All time taking care of your truck when it is broken down.
  • All time spent providing a breath, saliva, or urine sample for drug/alcohol testing, including travel to and from the collection site.
  • All time spent doing any other work for a motor carrier, including giving or receiving training and driving a company car.

All other time in or on a CMV other than:

This does NOT include: ime spent resting in or on a parked vehicle, expected otherwise provided.Time spent resting in a sleeper berthUp to 3 hours riding in the passenger seat of a property-carrying vehicle moving on a highway immediately before or after a period of at least 7 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth.

Generally thought of as a "daily" limit, but it is not based on a 24-hour period. You can drive up to 11 hours for 14 consecutive days before being required to take a minimum 10-hour break.

14-Hour Driving Window

When does this time window start?

It starts when you begin any kind of work.

Give me an example!

You have had 10 consecutive hours off and you come back to work at 6 AM. You must not drive the truck after 8 PM, which is 14 hours later. You may do other work after 8 PM, but you cannot drive anymore until you have taken another 10 consecutive hours off.

The 60/70 hour time limit is based on a 7-or 8- day period, starting from the first day of work. It is the total on-duty time, not just driving time. Once you reach the limit, you can do other work, but you are not permitted to drive.This is based on consecutive days, not necessarily the Sunday through Saturday time frame.

On-Duty Time Maximum limits (including non-driving activities)

60/70-hour On-duty Limit

A: Total of 67hours work. Driver is in complianceB: Total of 73 hours worked. Driver is in violation.C: Driver does not work a full day. The first day of his/her hours "drops" off and they are now again in compliance at 63 hours. They can only drive another 7 hours for the rest of the schedule before a 34 hour Restart.

Dropping DaysWhen are working multiple days and there is a day of no work, the first day will drop off.

Give me an example!

TIME BASE TO BE RECORDED: You must use the time zone in effect at your home terminal. Even if you cross other time zones, record time as it is at your terminal All drivers operating out of your home terminal must use the same starting time for the 24-hour period, as designated by your employer.

The "Remarks"

Each time you change your duty status, you must write down the name of the city, town or village and State abbreviation, in the Remarks section. If the change of duty status takes place at a location other than a city, town, village you must show one of the following:

  • The highway number and nearest milepost followed by the name of the nearest city, town, village and State abbreviation.
  • The highway number and the name of the service plaza followed by name of the nearest city, town, or village, and State abbreviation.
  • The highway number of two nearest intersecting roadways followed by the name of the nearest city, town, or village and State abbreviation.

You may write other things in the Remarks section, such as shipping information, a note about adverse driving conditions, or when you cross a State line.

During the 14-hour window of time, you are allowed to drive your truck no more than 11 total hours. In addition, driving is not permitted if more than 8 hours have passed since the driver's last break in driving time of at least 30 minutes and must be off duty for 10 consecutive hours before driving again.

11 hour driving limit

6:00 - 2:00 PM - Start Work (7 hours)2:00 - 2:30 PM - Break (1/2 hour)2:30 - 6:30 PM- Work (4 hours)TOTAL HOURS WORKED: 11

Give me an example!

You have had 10 consecutive hours off. You come to work at 6AM and drive until 2PM. You have a break of thirty minutes from 2 - 2:30 PM. You can drive from 2:30 PM to 6:30 PM. Totaling 11 hours worked. You cannot drive again until another 10 consecutive hours off duty. You may do other work after 6:30 PM. but you cannot drive.

There is additional information regarding sleeper berths, however no ALS vehicles have them and it will not be addressed in this training.

Remarks: This is the area where you must list the city, town or village and State abbreviation when a change of duty status occurs. You should also explain any unusual circumstances or log entries that be unclear when reviewed later, such as encountering adverse driving conditions.

Interstate Commerce

A trade, traffic, or transportation in the United States - (1) Between a place in a State and a place of such State (including a place outside of the United States); (2) Between two places in a State as part of trade, traffic, or transportation originiating or terminating outside the State or the United States.

Miscellaneous

All time spent doing paid work for anyone who is not a motor carrier, whether paid or not, and all the time you are doing paid work for anyone else.

TOTAL HOURS: You must add and write down the total hours for each duty status at the right side of the grid. The total of entries must equal 24 hours (unless you are using one page to reflect several consecutive days off-duty.

  • All time at the plant, terminal, facility, or other property of a motor carrier or shipper, or on any public property, waiting to be dispatched, unless you have been relieved of duty by the motor carrier.
  • All time inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any truck, including fueling it and washing it at any time.

Non-driving Time