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Transcript

PRESENTATION

PORTFOLIO

Team

Data

Timeline

BIBLIOGRAPHY

EVALUATION

CHILDREN'S THEATRE

COSTUME DESIGNER

STIMULUS RESEARCH

DEVISING RESEARCH

LOGBOOK

Index

THE PROCESS

01

SECTION ONE: LOGBOOKS

WEEK ONE: LOGBOOK

The session began on Monday with a stimulating warm-up designed to get our minds in line with the upcoming project of devising. We got into several exciting games to clear our minds, such as the thought-provoking "Mafia," where players had to use reasoning to identify the murderer. We moved on to spatial awareness exercises where we had to go walk around the room at different paces. We also divided into groups according to the numbers that were announced, which encouraged teamwork and rapid thinking. The classic games of "Splat" and "Zip, Zap, Boing" brought a sense of fun and laughter to our exercises. After this lively beginning, we split up into groups for our main devising task, with each group given a particular theme to explore. The theme for our group was "abandonment issues," which is a sensitive topic that inspired an engaging story. We set up a setting where a bunch of friends were about to start their college careers after graduating from high school. One of our group members, overwhelmed by a feeling of unexpected acceptance, struggled with the approaching parting. As the scene unfolded, each character gradually departed to pursue the next chapter of their lives. My character lingered, torn between the excitement of realizing her dream of attending her dream college and the guilt of leaving a friend behind. Ultimately, she made the difficult decision to prioritize her aspirations, symbolizing the bittersweet reality that friendships can be tested and strained by the pursuit of individual dreams. The devised scene poignantly communicated the delicate nature of relationships and how easily the bonds of friendship can be altered by the pursuit of personal ambitions.

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WEEK ONE: CREATING A SCENE

Keeping in mind that we were performing for children aged 7 to 13, we began to consider the themes we may cover in our 7–10 minute show. We were at a loss on how to convey our theme ideas, which included topics like PTSD, abandonment issues, and similar subjects, without turning them into something overly dark. However, we devised multiple ways to get around this issue. We chose to create an entertaining play rather than a dark and tragic one, despite having some excellent ideas for the plot of our play. It was much simpler to come up with ideas for our characters, the plot, and the overall direction of the play after we decided on the genre. We wanted the children to enjoy the performance and have a good time because we were performing for them and it included comedy relief. We all believed that this was the greatest way to approach our devising piece because it was much easier to come up with ideas. We then started to make a mindmap of our scenes and ideas to help us picture our ideas once we decided how we wanted to approach our play. After talking about how we may play out these scenes, we started experimenting with some of our ideas to see whether they fit the way we had pictured them. Afterward, we were instructed to visit the library for a study on the topic of devising, our secondary responsibility as designers within the group, and the art of performing in front of children, which was our primary challenge. This was because we had several ideas, but the age restriction and the possibility that the children weren't going to understand them would prevent us from showcasing them. My understanding of devising: 'A group collaboration to create a script based around its own concept and themes to come up with an original performance' - the basic theatre studies Robert Leach page 33. Parsons: "Devised theatre refers to the process of creative collaboration by a group of performers to generate and assemble a performance through improvisation, discussion, and rehearsal." - Devised theatre's collaborative performance - making masterpieces from collective concepts: Telory D. Arendall foreword by Allen J. Kuharski page 2

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WEEK ONE: WORKSHOP

We had a workshop on Tuesday and were given an introduction to the basic aspects of lighting and sound design; while we did touch on costume and set design, the workshop's focus was primarily on these two areas. After discussing the importance of sound and lighting in the industry and how incorrectly applied or misplaced cues can make or break a performance, we were assigned a task. I mentioned "Frozen" when asked if we had seen any recent musicals, which brought up the subject of lighting and sound as we then had to talk about the type of lighting that would be used in that theatrical play. We said that Frozen would use various blue tones to represent the snow and ice, which would later inspire the lighting designers. It's crucial to know when and where to apply lighting, so rehearsals are necessary to ensure that both the lighting designer and the actor always get it perfect. We also discussed the lights' brightness and contrast. The teacher talked about how bright the lighting was and how crucial it was that the person in charge of the lights knew the scene's tone. This would benefit the lighting designer because the actors would still look natural even with low light exposure in a sad scenario. The lights would be low but not too low so that the audience can see the actors on stage. Keeping this in mind performs a more authentic and realistic feel. Lighting has a significant impact since it may connect the performance and enhance the audience's experience. It also makes the performance better, so the lighting designer and the actors will benefit from understanding these small details. When we had decided on the lighting for Frozen, we proceeded to the next musical, The Lion King, using the same lighting design technique. After being divided into two groups, we worked on three scenes to determine the type of lighting, where it would come from, and the intensity of the lighting. My knowledge of the lighting and sound design process for performance has improved as a result of this session. Even though it's not my secondary role in the group, I still learned a lot about the lighting and sound design process from this experience. There were certain things I learned from the session, such as the importance of preparation and rehearsals for a great performance, which I knew already, but it's interesting to see how much work goes into a single aspect of the show, like the lighting. Working as an ensemble will benefit the performance as a whole and the sharing and exploration of the artistic vision, I learned from that experience.

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Mentally absent

WEEK ONE: FIRST MOVEMENT PIECE

For our movement piece, before we came up with the idea of a comedic play, we were creating a piece based off the theme of 'mentally not there'. We all had our own interpretations of what we took from the phrase. What I took from mentally not there was how I would stare into space not moving or reacting to what I'm staring at showing how I wasn't in the present.

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WEEK TWO: CHARACTER

We had a workshop on Tuesday and were given an introduction to the basic aspects of lighting and sound design; while we did touch on costume and set design, the workshop's focus was primarily on these two areas. After discussing the importance of sound and lighting in the industry and how incorrectly applied or misplaced cues can make or break a performance, we were assigned a task. I mentioned "Frozen" when asked if we had seen any recent musicals, which brought up the subject of lighting and sound as we then had to talk about the type of lighting that would be used in that theatrical play. We said that Frozen would use various blue tones to represent the snow and ice, which would later inspire the lighting designers. It's crucial to know when and where to apply lighting, so rehearsals are necessary to ensure that both the lighting designer and the actor always get it perfect. We also discussed the lights' brightness and contrast. The teacher talked about how bright the lighting was and how crucial it was that the person in charge of the lights knew the scene's tone. This would benefit the lighting designer because the actors would still look natural even with low light exposure in a sad scenario. The lights would be low but not too low so that the audience can see the actors on stage. Keeping this in mind performs a more authentic and realistic feel. Lighting has a significant impact since it may connect the performance and enhance the audience's experience. It also makes the performance better, so the lighting designer and the actors will benefit from understanding these small details. When we had decided on the lighting for Frozen, we proceeded to the next musical, The Lion King, using the same lighting design technique. After being divided into two groups, we worked on three scenes to determine the type of lighting, where it would come from, and the intensity of the lighting. My knowledge of the lighting and sound design process for performance has improved as a result of this session. Even though it's not my secondary role in the group, I still learned a lot about the lighting and sound design process from this experience. There were certain things I learned from the session, such as the importance of preparation and rehearsals for a great performance, which I knew already, but it's interesting to see how much work goes into a single aspect of the show, like the lighting. Working as an ensemble will benefit the performance as a whole and the sharing and exploration of the artistic vision, I learned from that experience.

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WEEK FOUR: COSTUME

We started our Thursday class by discussing my suggestions for our performance's costumes. I chose a straightforward policeman's outfit so that our intended audience would easily identify the characters. I want Big C's outfit to stand in stark contrast to both his actual size and the way he referred to himself—Big C, even though he was rather small. Additionally, it would signify the arrogance he displayed and pride that his company is the best in New York and that no one could match its achievements. He would dress in an oversized blazer that would trail behind him while he moved, highlighting the comedic aspect of the performance once more. Since he comes from a wealthy family with strong connections, he feels he has power and authority, which is why he would be wearing a black fedora. Given that silk is a pricey fabric to wear, the blazer would be made of it, demonstrating his position in society and wealth. Two of Big C's bodyguards would always carry the blazer to his house in a briefcase after it had been dry cleaned, which demonstrates his lack of trust in people and his terrible financial decisions which also shows his arrogance. He believes that no one important to him should look his way or anything that belongs to him, indicating how conceited he is. He uses wool for his dressing robe at home because it's a high-quality material that's also comfortable and soft, making it an excellent choice for staying warm. "Unlike synthetic fibers which can leave you hot and sweaty, wool allows your body to breathe. This means you stay comfortable, and not shiny-of-face." Wool is environmentally beneficial and increases the income of hard-working farmers because it is biodegradable and its production has little effect on the environment. Wool is also non-irritating to the skin and does not aggravate allergies like asthma. You will wake up feeling fine, rather than experiencing uncomfortable congestion and sore eyes. Since in the 1980s, New York had multiple days of rainy and cold days, Big C would have a wardrobe dedicated to clothes for the winter, which would contain materials like wool and Merino wool which is a very warm fabric. "It is much warmer than cotton, polyester, and regular wool. Only lambswool and cashmere manage to give it competition in terms of warmth. Cashmere is slightly warmer than merino wool, while lambswool is almost at the same level in terms of heat retention."

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EXPANDING OUR IDEAS

02

SECTION TWO: RESEARCH

This kind of theatre targets younger audiences and focuses on family-friendly productions. These tales have elements from fairy tales, traditions, current events, and real-life topics. Dragon Land, The Little Princess, and Cinderella are a few examples of children's theatre. The first children's plays with modern themes started to appear in the middle of the 1920s. A variety of young females who were excellent at playing masculine roles were showcased in the staging of these roles. Drama has played a significant role in children's theatre repertoire since the early 1930s, supporting schools and creative institutions' educational efforts. Starting with the Punch and Judy puppet performances, which were the first performance forms acknowledged as children's entertainment, is the greatest way to see how children's theatre has developed. These puppet shows date back to the 17th century and feature the characters of Mr. Punch and his wife Judy in various situations that children find funny. Typically, these scenarios involve some type of mischief or chaos, which serves to further attract the audience. Children's theatre now deals with issues of loss and friendship in addition to promoting creative and interactive storytelling. Social cognition theory can be used in this situation because it produces an emotional reaction when one considers the actors' friendship and observes them engaging in beneficial activities like holding hands and smiling. The original inspiration for children's theatre came from theatre in general and from the desire to entertain young audiences. Understanding that the main goal of children's theatre is to teach children valuable lessons through the portrayal of characters and scenarios that encourage them to acknowledge and maintain moral principles that will help them become adults. I've discovered that a lot of ideas will be discussed but not carried out while making a performance for a younger audience because of the age restriction. When you perform for children, you have to pay attention to your words, body language, technique, and other aspects of your performance. Children's theatre means paying attention to the minor details that some people might overlook. While avoiding very serious or dark subjects that the kids won't understand, make sure the show is engaging enough for them to sit through. Not getting distracted makes this more difficult. It must also be considered that certain children may have difficulties or limitations that prevent them from sitting still or from making a lot of noise, which should be taken into consideration. This complicates the process of developing a theatrical production because, although we may have creative concepts, the children may be impacted if they are strong, violent, or negative. For this reason, to break the tension and provide an environment where they wouldn't have to sit quietly, my group decided to perform a comedic play. Because my group was considerate about performing for young audiences, they may laugh and engage with our show.

CHILDREN'S THEATRE

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MENTALLY ABSENT: DEREALIZATION + DEPERSONALIZATION

Unaware of it, an absent-minded individual is frequently thinking. This person daydreams and is unaware of what is going on around them. They become forgetful due to the distracting thoughts. A common symptom of anxiety is derealization, which is a feeling of disassociation from your external surroundings. Derealization anxiety can make a person feel as though something is wrong with reality and that everything is falling apart around them. This might occasionally make things seem "unreal," as if something is off in the world they live in. According to experts, extreme trauma like child abuse and war can cause derealization. Therefore, derealization might serve as a protective mechanism to prevent more injury. "Roughly 66% of traumatized people experience derealization in their lifetime." In a place where it seems impossible for you to understand what is going on or the surroundings. Even familiar surroundings can appear unusual and unfamiliar because your brain is unable to process the information being gathered by your senses (sound, sight, etc.). This is a terrifying and incredibly odd experience. Frequently, you may have the impression that you are not truly in the place you are in or that the world is not real. It's possible to have the impression that you're witnessing something without knowing what it is or that you're trapped in a dream. Sometimes depersonalization and derealization go hand in hand, giving you the impression that you're watching yourself. When you frequently or consistently believe that you are viewing yourself from outside of your body, that objects around you are not real, or both, you may have a depersonalization-derealization condition. Depersonalization and derealization feelings can be extremely unsettling. It could seem as though you're dreaming. Depersonalization or derealization is a common experience for many people. However, if you find it difficult to function and these symptoms continue or never completely go away, you may have a depersonalization-derealization condition. People who have experienced trauma, such as abuse, violence, or other forms of severe stress are more likely to have this medical condition. It can be difficult to effectively express the condition's experience and feelings. Fear of "going crazy" can divert your attention from confirming your existence and discovering the truth. Typically, symptoms start in early adulthood or the middle or late stages of the teenage years.

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MENTALLY ABSENT: SHIFTING

The Multiverse Theory, commonly known as the Many Worlds Hypothesis, is the foundation for reality shifting. According to this theory, all potential other timelines are real in parallel universes. As such, each of these parallel universes contains endless versions of oneself. The key to reality shifting is acknowledging that you are aware of these different worlds. In simple terms, reality shifting is an experiential method of channeling the power of your imagination. Although some people may experience reality shifting as very genuine, there is no scientific evidence to support this theory. On the other hand, reality shifting has become quite well-known and popular, and a large number of internet communities have developed around it. A healthy coping strategy for prior trauma or any other mental health concerns is not reality shifting. You face the danger of those difficulties getting worse in the future if you use reality-shifting as a way to avoid problems. If you're having problems with your mental health, speak with friends and family or seek professional help and counseling.There are different types of dreaming or reality shifting:Lucid dreaming: When you experience lucid dreaming, you become conscious of your dreams. Some believe that at that point, they can control and interact with the objects in their dream. The main difference between lucid dreaming and shifting is that the former requires you to be asleep. Even while completely awake, reality shifting is still possible. To have a lucid dream, you also typically don't prepare as much.Maladaptive daydreaming: When your mind drifts to unrelated thoughts, usually on its own, it is said to be daydreaming. Maladaptive daydreaming is defined as excessive daydreaming, often lasting hours on end. It is frequently a harmful coping strategy used to handle personal issues. In contrast to reality shifting, maladaptive daydreaming is typically uncontrollable. Furthermore, there is currently no proof that reality shifting is harmful.

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COSTUME DESIGNER RESEARCH

"Costume designers research, design and create costumes for TV, film, theatre, and dance productions, and work at the discretion of the director and producers. Some costume designers may specialize in particular genres or periods, while others work on general costuming." My secondary role within the group is designing the costumes. In addition to designing costumes, a costume designer manages the wardrobe department for films, television series, plays, and dance companies. In addition, costume designers may be employed by other artistic companies or historical reenactment groups. Creating costumes for actors and performers that fit the period, aesthetic, tone, and production design is the aim of this role. For instance, historically accurate outfits are frequently created by costume designers for period dramas. Close collaboration exists between costume designers, directors, producers, and actors guaranteeing that their designs satisfy the needs of everyone involved. A creative job path, costume design requires a lot of time spent in a design studio, communicating with other members of a production team, and researching your ideas and designs. Costume designers travel to film locations and venues in addition to working on sets and in studios. As a costume designer, you could have to travel for meetings, and if you're working on a production that is filming far away, you might have to stay overnight. Careers in costume design may need significant interaction with other individuals, such as production workers and other designers. Creativity is essential for costume designers. The goal of costume designers is to create unique and special outfits that are historically or culturally authentic. You may differentiate yourself from other costume designers and build a solid name in the business by incorporating your distinctive style into your creations. Costume designers need to be patient, especially when they have a deadline to meet. Creating elaborate costumes is usually a multi-step procedure that takes time. If a costume doesn't fit right away, it may need to be altered. You might have to make changes to the outfit right up until the last minute. Actors' requests or script modifications may result in last-minute alterations. To be able to include complicated designs in their work, costume designers need to have great attention to detail. Designers who pay close attention to details are also better able to spot minor problems, cuts, and continuity issues during filming.

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PTSD RESEARCH:

(PTSD), a disorder of mental health marked by consequences after experiencing a traumatic incident. Direct involvement with or observation of an incident involving actual or threatened death, major injury, or sexual assault can set off post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). People with PTSD frequently experience a variety of symptoms that can be bothersome and intrusive, greatly impairing their ability to go about their everyday lives. Flashbacks: Repeated, upsetting memories of the traumatic incident that are frequently experienced as though they are happening again. Numerous triggers connected to the trauma can cause flashbacks.Nightmares: Unsettling dreams associated with the traumatic incident may be a factor in insomnia and other sleep disorders. Severe Anxiety: Characterized by increased, ongoing anxiety that occasionally reaches drastic proportions. Those with PTSD may always feel threatened or in danger.Uncontrollable Thoughts: Pervasive, upsetting memories of the traumatic incident that interfere with day-to-day activities and frequently cause a great deal of distress.Emotional and Physical Reactions: Heightened "fight or flight" response, sweating, palpitations, anxiety, panic attacks, and other intense reactions when the traumatic incident is recalled.Avoidance: PTSD sufferers may steer clear of things that bring back memories of the traumatic incident, such as individuals, places, or activities. This avoidance can also apply to discussions or ideas focused on the incident.Negative Shifts in Thought and Emotion: Continuously pessimistic views about oneself or the outside world, misplaced guilt, detachment from other people, and discomfort feelings.

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CREATING A SCENE: FIRST RESEARCH

Here is a video of the ideas that we came up with for our performance called 'Cookies'. This video was our first drafted idea of what we wanted our performance to be and what the backstory behind the characters was. We decided to have our characters go through the loss of a friend to link to the theme of PTSD and how it affects them afterward, the process of how they overcome their struggles and mental health instead of letting it consume them. Someone would also be struggling with abandonment issues from past experiences which would link back to the storyline. My character and another are two friends who go to the same school and are going through similar experiences. The two other characters are detectives, however, one of them is friends with the two school kids and struggles to be a detective while dealing with his problems of his past.

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NAUGHTY BY NATURE RESEARCH: HISTORICAL CONTEXT

Naughty By Nature is a hip-hop trio from East Orange, New Jersey which includes Anthony "Trench", Criss Vincent "Vin Rock", Brown, and Keir Lamont "DJ Kay Gee". They became a trio in 1986, with the original name of 'The New Style' but then later changed to 'Naughty By Nature'. In 1989, the group released their debut album, 'Independent Leaders' which featured the single, 'Suffin Those Knees.' The album had moderate success but did not sell 500,000 copies after releasing their first album, the group was mentored by Dana Elaine "Queen Latifah" Owens. In 1991, they released their second album Naughty By Nature which featured three singles, "OPP", "Everything's Gonna be Alright", and "Uptown Anthem." This album sold over a million units and was certified platinum, which was also nominated for a Grammy in 1991 for Best Rap Performance by a duo or group. In 1992 the group won an American Music Award for favorite new artist Rap/Hip-Hop. The group's experiences growing up on the streets of East Orange, New Jersey, are explored in depth in their song 'Naughty By Nature. It captures their outlook on living in a rough environment and their will to overcome all obstacles. Naughty by Nature demonstrates their raw and genuine style with honest lyrics and upbeat delivery. The lyrics address several topics, such as pride, loyalty, and surviving on the streets. They provide a clear image of the difficulties experienced by people who live in cities where hardship and violence are everyday occurrences. The melancholy poetry of Naughty by Nature highlights the value of remaining true to oneself and bravery in the face of difficulty. The group members' perspectives and musical influences were affected by their experiences with the law and witnessing various sorts of violence. Their goal was to clarify the misunderstandings surrounding their group and to shine a light on their personal experiences. Furthermore, people are still inspired and empowered by the song's strong message of perseverance and remaining true to oneself. Its enduring appeal as a hip-hop playlist classic is due to its addictive beats and memorable hooks, which will guarantee that the song's influence will last for many generations. All things considered, Naughty by Nature's "Naughty By Nature" is an engaging song that captures the harsh realities of living in a rough community. It has become a classic hip-hop song due to its strong message and alluring sound.

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A proud social and political conservatism defined American society in the 1980s. The turning point of American conservatism in the late 20th century was reached when Republican Ronald Reagan was elected president in 1980. Conservatives, embodied in the Republican Party, support holding onto traditional beliefs and practices. They think the federal government should have less authority over the lives of American citizens and are against any abrupt changes to the country's power structure. Liberals, as represented by the Democratic Party, on the other hand, support a more powerful federal government. They support political changes that broaden democracy, improve wealth distribution, and affect the evolution of society. Serious social issues were making news, and some individuals were worried, even outside of malls and mail-order inventories. While many Americans spent freely, others had nothing left over when the Reagan government discontinued funding several social services. As more and more Americans lost their houses, they discovered that society lacked the resources and the will to assist them during their difficult time. Many of them were abandoned, adding to the number of homeless people that roam the streets of American cities. The decade saw a sharp increase in child abuse reports as well, overloading social care institutions. Finally, authorities deemed the issue of child abuse to be "a national emergency." Similar to homelessness, American society frequently fails to adequately address child abuse. Americans managed to find time for religion even in this decade of excess. According to numerous surveys, the vast majority of people in the nation firmly believed in a Supreme Being and an afterlife. Many, however, found it difficult to follow the strict customs of their churches and turned to other religions. A combination of ancient mystical ideas and Eastern philosophy, the New Age movement drew in millions of Americans. Televised preachers, or televangelists, were the exact opposite of New Agers. Along with witnessing a sharp increase in their following, they also found financial success. Equipped with wealth and the attention of numerous Americans, these evangelists attempted to take advantage of their platforms to persuade individuals to adopt their political and religious viewpoints. Some even went so far as to enter national politics. Politicians clarified that everyone in America would gain from the increasing wealth experienced by the wealthy. As they put it, the growing economy was a "rising tide" that would "lift all boats." Rich people's tax savings would "trickle down" to less well-off Americans. However, a large number of Americans missed out on the decade's success. African Americans' incomes did not increase in line with white Americans'. Poverty remained a serious issue in America's inner cities. Young people in many places joined gangs because they provided safety and a sense of community. These gangs got more and more violent, especially in and around Los Angeles, California. Their actions were included in several films towards the end of the decade, such as 1988's Colors. In many American communities, homelessness has also grown to be a significant social problem.

NAUGHTY BY NATURE RESEARCH: SOCIAL CONTEXT

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- American culture became a culture of consumption as shopping became Americans' number-one hobby. For some, shopping became a religion and the shopping mall the new American church. A good education, a good job, and a loving family no longer define success for many Americans. They had to have an M.B.A degree, a high-paying job, an elegant home or apartment, a membership to an upscale health club, and the necessary clothes to give at least the appearance they had succeeded. Indeed, for these Americans, called "yuppies", dressing for success became the rule to live by. They wanted more, and they were in a hurry to get it. Popular phrases that arose in the decade—"A.S.A.P." (as soon as possible), "What's the bottom line?" and "cut to the chase"—communicated their sense of urgency as they sought money and a way of life that flaunted it.⁃ Yuppie culture:The political conservatism of the 1980s was reflected in certain ways in the popular culture of the time. The young, urban professional, or "yuppie," a baby boomer with a college degree, a well-paying job, and fashionable tastes, was, for many, the definition of the decade. Numerous individuals mocked yuppies for being conceited and materialistic, and nationwide surveys of young urban professionals revealed that they were, in fact, more focused on accumulating wealth and purchasing goods than their parents and grandparents had been. - Entertainment:In contrast to the 1970s, when controversial films tackled difficult issues, immature entertainment was the most popular in the 1980s. Movies such as "Die Hard," "Ghostbusters," "The Breakfast Club," and "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" managed to keep box office earnings high while capturing the attention of viewers. During this decade, blockbusters also took the spotlight. Films like "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial," "Beverly Hills Cop," and massive franchises like Star Wars, Back to the Future, and Indiana Jones attracted audiences of all ages and earned hundreds of millions of dollars both domestically and internationally.

NAUGHTY BY NATURE RESEARCH: CULTURAL CONTEXT

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- Television:Millions of people watched sitcoms like "The Cosby Show," "The Simpsons," "Family Ties," "Roseanne," and "Married...with Children" at home. They also stayed away from broadcast network programming and used their new VCRs to rent films. As cable service was now available to 60% of American television owners, broadcast networks acknowledged by the end of the 1980s that they were facing major challenges. Cable networks including HBO, Cinemax, TBS, and Nickelodeon quickly became household names. When the Cable News Network debuted in 1980, it quickly rose to popularity as a key provider of 24-hour, global satellite news delivery of both American and foreign news. A year later, MTV, another ground-breaking cable network, debuted and fundamentally altered American perceptions of dancing, music, and fashion.- Music:Music videos that MTV aired turned musicians such as Madonna, Prince, Whitney Houston, and Michael Jackson became megastars. Jackson's "Thriller" video, for example, sold 600,000 CDs in the five days following its premiere. Other videos featured bands like Duran Duran, R.E.M., and Culture Club. Eventually, MTV developed as a platform for people who disapproved of or were excluded from the yuppie, mainly white culture. Urban Blacks' dissatisfaction was captured by rap and hip-hop groups like Public Enemy in their influential album "It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back." But as a result of MTV's persistent promotion of white bands and musicians, alternative venues quickly became available for growing performers. In an attempt to compete with MTV, BET, or Black Entertainment Television, debuted in 1980 by showcasing Black musicians and bands. Hard rock bands like Guns N' Roses and Metallica captured the general sense of unhappiness among youth, especially among young men. Electronic music, house music, reggae, new wave, and other dance-club classics also enjoyed a rise in popularity during the 1980s.

NAUGHTY BY NATURE RESEARCH: CULTURAL CONTEXT

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- Fashion:MTV not only provided a platform for music, but it also had an impact on fashion. People tried their hardest to imitate the looks and haircuts they saw in music videos, both domestically and internationally. Boy George, MC Hammer, Madonna, and other singers quickly rose to fame as style icons. Beneath the glamorous exterior of MTV, however, was another growing impact on music and style: London's punk culture and new-wave fashion, in particular, developed from a late 1970s trend into a powerful 1980s global fashion force, headed by designers such as Vivienne Westwood. Spiked hair, Doc Martens boots, ripped jeans and jackets (complete with safety pins and other metallic accessories), and heavy makeup were all the rage. Athletic wear, such as tracksuits, leg warmers, and running or basketball shoes worn for daily wear, was another trend in 1980s fashion. Following the publication of Lisa Birnbach's "The Official Preppy Handbook" in 1980, the preppy look—which mirrored the attire of buttoned-up professionals and Ivy League students—invaded both college campuses and nightclubs.

NAUGHTY BY NATURE RESEARCH: CULTURAL CONTEXT

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- American culture became a culture of consumption as shopping became Americans' number-one hobby. For some, shopping became a religion and the shopping mall the new American church. A good education, a good job, and a loving family no longer define success for many Americans. They had to have an M.B.A degree, a high-paying job, an elegant home or apartment, a membership to an upscale health club, and the necessary clothes to give at least the appearance they had succeeded. Indeed, for these Americans, called "yuppies", dressing for success became the rule to live by. They wanted more, and they were in a hurry to get it. Popular phrases that arose in the decade—"A.S.A.P." (as soon as possible), "What's the bottom line?" and "cut to the chase"—communicated their sense of urgency as they sought money and a way of life that flaunted it.⁃ Yuppie culture:The political conservatism of the 1980s was reflected in certain ways in the popular culture of the time. The young, urban professional, or "yuppie," a baby boomer with a college degree, a well-paying job, and fashionable tastes, was, for many, the definition of the decade. Numerous individuals mocked yuppies for being conceited and materialistic, and nationwide surveys of young urban professionals revealed that they were, in fact, more focused on accumulating wealth and purchasing goods than their parents and grandparents had been. - Entertainment:In contrast to the 1970s, when controversial films tackled difficult issues, immature entertainment was the most popular in the 1980s. Movies such as "Die Hard," "Ghostbusters," "The Breakfast Club," and "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" managed to keep box office earnings high while capturing the attention of viewers. During this decade, blockbusters also took the spotlight. Films like "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial," "Beverly Hills Cop," and massive franchises like Star Wars, Back to the Future, and Indiana Jones attracted audiences of all ages and earned hundreds of millions of dollars both domestically and internationally.

CHARACTER RESEARCH

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From the early 1980s to the mid-1990s, the White Tigers were a well-known Chinese American street gang in Flushing, Queens, and the northern part of Chinatown, New York City. They were founded in 1980 by ABCs (American-born Chinese) and immigrants from China who were of the Cantonese and Taiwanese ethnicities. In keeping with the set's name, they decided to dress all in white. The group frequently got into violent territory disputes with other Queens gangs, like the younger Green Dragons, throughout the 1980s. They engaged in extortion, kidnapping, illegal gaming, racketeering, drug and human trafficking, arson, and murder, among other crimes. Early in the 1980s, new gangs began to appear in the outskirts of other boroughs of New York City, sometimes adopting the immigration patterns of the Chinese. A Chinese community began to form in Flushing, Queens, and this group gave rise to the White Tigers. As a result, the group quickly began to prey on locals by robbing and stealing small businesses. With authorization from the Ghost Shadows, the White Tigers did hold land on Mott Street in Manhattan's upper Chinatown; nevertheless, their primary area was in Queens, which experts believed to be prime real estate. Such an unknown region made it possible for a new gang, the White Tigers, to thrive. Similar to the Fuk Ching gang, the White Tigers generally assisted foreign smugglers by capturing immigrants who arrived in the country by air or water and imprisoned them until a smuggling fee was reached. Twenty-two Chinese immigrants were discovered under the protection of White Tigers members in a Bayside, Queens home. The immigrants had landed in California on June 2, 1993.

GANGS IN NEW YORK

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Understanding that losing one's connection to reality due to mental absence can have a significant impact on an individual. If they are unable to return to reality—that is, if they are trapped in their imagination—this could put them in dangerous situations. Although having the ability to create things with our minds can seem like a positive thing, it's crucial to be aware of the risks involved and take steps to keep them from getting worse. In my opinion, mentally distancing oneself from reality and entering the realm of the imagination is what it is to be mentally absent. What I mean by mentally absent is a means of escaping the present and exploring the future or even the past to one's preference. Wishing to escape our issues since we build a false world free of evil or concerns. Almost building a universe around their desires and interests.

Mentally not present

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In my opinion, this image captures the experience of being mentally absent. Our minds are so strong that they can transport us to another realm or dimension when we're not there. Many apply their imaginations as a means of escaping reality, preferring not to remain in a life in which they might not feel valued or loved. A person's imagination can help them build their own world, which may not seem terrible at first but can have negative impacts when they return to reality since they may have high expectations from their fantasy. This is another way that imaginations contribute to the feeling of not being mentally present.