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English for Academic puRposes

DLI

EAP

Start

Content

What

Why

Who

How

References

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WHO

Business Problem

Learning Gap

Learning Outcomes

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Why

Learning Outcomes

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Bloom's Taxonomy

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  • Remember a variety of academic genres and topics.
  • Identify suitable sources for writing and understand proper referencing.

  • Understand and apply grammar and vocabulary typical of academic discourse.
  • Comprehend critical thinking and develop critical approaches.

  • Analyse and critique academic genres in terms of structure and content.
  • Analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of different reading strategies.

  • Apply critical thinking skills to analyse and evaluate information.
  • Apply effective listening and communication skills in diverse situations such as lectures and seminars.

  • Evaluate and enhance the complexity of grammar and vocabulary in academic discourse.
  • Evaluate and improve critical thinking skills in reading, thinking, and writing.

  • Write a literature review.
  • Present a topic in an academic format.
  • Create and execute basic research projects using key research methods.

Module 2: The Writing Process

Module 3:Sources

Module 6: Vocabulary for Writing

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Module 5:Elements of Writing1

Module 4: Structuring Academic Essays

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Module 9:Writing Research Papers

Module 7:Writing Models

Module 8: Presentation Skills in Academic Settings

Module 1: Introduction to Academic English1

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What

  • The Purpose of Academic English
  • Academic Writing Styles and Expectations
  • Finding Suitable Resources

  • Planning and Organizing Your Writing
  • Reading Methods
  • Key-Points and Note-Taking

  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • Summarising and Paraphrasing
  • References and Quotations

  • Combining Sources
  • Organising Paragraphs
  • Introductions and Conclusions

  • Argument and Discussion
  • Cause and Effect, Cohesion and Comparisons
  • Problems and Solutions

  • Academic Vocabulary
  • Achieving the Right Academic Tone and Style
  • Addressing Common Grammar Challenges

  • Principles of Structuring Academic Presentations
  • Designing Engaging Presentation Slides
  • Delivery Techniques for Academic Talks

  • Case Studies
  • Literature Review and Book Review
  • Writing Longer Essays
  • Reports and surveys

  • Understanding Research Paper Format
  • Organizing and Structuring Research Papers
  • Integrating Primary and Secondary Sources

Format: Core and spoke

The modules will be added on a user-friendly online learning platform that supports various multimedia formats, live seminars, discussion forums, and interactive elements. Core multimedia eLearning contains the main content, such as reading different academic works and exploring concepts and features of academic English.

Spoke elements offer a lot of variety as the learner will be able to attend live seminars, watch the lectures in their own time, add reflections, questions discussions, feedback on social platform. They will also access various online tasks, for example paraphrasing and summarising a part of an article and post it on the social platform to receive feedback from tutors and peers. Moreover, the toolkits will provide additional content for a deeper dive into the subject.

HOW

Delivery

Timeline

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • One reason could be that Alex is not a native English speaker and despite being fluent in English, he does not feel confident using academic English.

English for Academic Purposes has been aligned with Bloom's taxonomy, covering different levels of cognitive skills from basic recall to higher order skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. It is essential to cover all aspects of academic English as Alex's persona struggles due to his lack of competence in delivering academic reports and presentations. He is very good at his job as a business analyst, specialising in collecting, analysing, and interpreting data to provide valuable insights and support decision making within her organization. However, a learning gap has been identified in meeting academic standards when structuring and delivering reports and presentations.

Learning Outcomes

Comentary

Learning outcomes are important in delivering impactful teaching and they represent “statements of what a learner knows, understands and is able to do after completion of learning” (Cedefop, 2009). The developed learning outcomes for EAP are designed to be “student-centred” and this approach allows students to be active participants in their learning, empowering them during the learning experience (Scott, 2011).

Business Problem

The organization faces a notable deficiency in academic skills among its employees, who are frequently required to engage in academic-oriented tasks, such as writing reports, analysing research papers, and presenting findings.Additionally, there is a challenge in articulating ideas in the academic manner necessitated by project requirements. This lack of proficiency hinders their ability to contribute optimally to roles that require advanced communication and analytical skills.

When designing training, it is essential to analyse the target audience and the learner data to include the essence of the individuals behind statistics such as gender and age. Therefore, an archetypal representation of the user groups is encapsulated in the learner persona and the objective is to build profiles that include the needs, objectives, technical competence, accessibility requirements and personal characteristics of the students (Cooper, 1999; Rogers et al., 2011; Saffer, 2009, as cited in Lilley et al., 2015).

The "Who" of digital learning

Commentary

According to Ambrose et al. (2010) students are not seen as passive recipients but as individuals who bring with them their own world view and experience that shape and influence learning. Consequently, “consideration of the learners’ prior knowledge, abilities, points of view, and perceived needs are an important part of a learner analysis process” (Brown & Green, 2015, p.73).

Alex's persona highlights the challenges and preferences of a professional who navigates a demanding and dynamic work environment. Frequent travel and a busy schedule necessitate learning solutions that are not only flexible but also easily accessible on various devices. He is motivated by his desire to upskill and improve professionally while maintaining a balance between work, study, and personal life.

The Rotational model embraces a holistic and interactive approach. By combining multimedia eLearning, live and asynchronous elements, online tasks, and toolkits, learners are empowered to engage with the material in various ways, creating a well-rounded and effective learning experience.

Delivering English for Academic Purposes (EAP) through a Rotational model is a strategic and dynamic approach to enhance the learning experience.

Mode of Delivery

Moreover, the study conducted by Grabe & Zhang (2013) reported that L2 students had weaker writing and reading skills in English, lack of knowledge about L2 text organization and less cultural and background awareness of the target language.For Alex's persona who want to become confident in academic writing and research skills in English, I chose to use a task-based approach when designing the series of lessons. This approach will help learners engage with meaningful authentic material to stimulate real-world academic contexts as they aim to meet the requirements of academic job project. The tasks are designed to increase in complexity and to scaffold students' learning, being seen as “building blocks” in learning academic writing style (Richards & Rodgers, 2010).

English for Academic Purposes is linked to the English for Specific Purposes movement which dates to the 1960s (Wingate & Tribble, 2012), and the ability to write in an academic style is essential to maintain the standards of academic writing required by higher education (Pineteh, 2013). Learning academic writing could be very challenging for L2 (second language) students since they face the influence of their native language, and they need to acquire the linguistic and cultural competence for effective communication in an academic context.

Modular Framework

Commentary

Timeline

  • The main content will take about 30-40 minutes to be completed and the learners should finish it before the live seminars.
  • The learners will actively participate in live seminars once every two weeks.
  • The purpose is to engage in small academic discussions with tutors and peers. They will have the option to choose between morning, afternoon, or evening sessions.
  • The online tasks and toolkits can be completed on a self-paced basis.

When designing training, it is essential to analyse the target audience and the learner data to include the essence of the individuals behind statistics such as gender and age. Therefore, an archetypal representation of the user groups is encapsulated in the learner persona and the objective is to build profiles that include the needs, objectives, technical competence, accessibility requirements and personal characteristics of the students (Cooper, 1999; Rogers et al., 2011; Saffer, 2009, as cited in Lilley et al., 2015).

The "Who" of digital learning

Commentary

According to Ambrose et al. (2010) students are not seen as passive recipients but as individuals who bring with them their own world view and experience that shape and influence learning. Consequently, “consideration of the learners’ prior knowledge, abilities, points of view, and perceived needs are an important part of a learner analysis process” (Brown & Green, 2015, p.73).

Alex's persona highlights the challenges and preferences of a professional who navigates a demanding and dynamic work environment. Frequent travel and a busy schedule necessitate learning solutions that are not only flexible but also easily accessible on various devices. He is motivated by his desire to upskill and improve professionally while maintaining a balance between work, study, and personal life.

  • Ineffective Communication
  • Limited Research and Analytical Skills
  • Difficulty in Producing Quality Reports
  • Inefficient Presentation Skills

Learning Gap