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Make the most of your creation by revealing surprising hidden content with Reveal interactivity. In the interactivity menu, select the Reveal option and then click on the element on the canvas that you want to make appear.

Wow Effect

You can use any photo, gif, or illustration you like to mix in some multimedia content.

Give your creation its own soundtrack! Include background music and sounds or record yourself from the Insert menu to include audio in your content.

  • “I enjoy perpetual spring: the season’s always bright,The trees have leaves: the ground is always green.I’ve a fruitful garden in the fields that were my dower, fanned by the breez, and watered by a flowing spring.” -(Ovid’s Fasti)
  • Ovid's Fasti desrives the settoing as an eternal spring with luscious green all around and fruitful trees. Botticelli decided to eminate the scene by drawing 190 different types of plants (cite) to create a blooming garden. Botticelli really captures the exssense of an eternal spring (...)

  • “I enjoy perpetual spring: the season’s always bright,The trees have leaves: the ground is always green.I’ve a fruitful garden in the fields that were my dower, fanned by the breeze, and watered by a flowing spring.” -(Ovid’s Fasti)
  • Ovid's Fasti describes the setting as an eternal spring with luscious green all around and fruitful trees. Botticelli decided to eminate the scene by drawing 190 different types of plants (Uffizi Gallery) to create a blooming garden. Botticelli really captures the exssense of an eternal spring that Fasti portrayed in his writing with these plants everywhere and with the characters featured in this piece.

Make it multimedia! If you want to include a video, copy the URL and paste it into the Insert tab in the Editor. You can activate options such as Autoplay, Loop, and Mute, depending on your preferences.

  • “Quickly, Cupid, hidden in those beautiful eyes, adjusts the notch of his arrow to his bowstring, then he draws back with his powerful arm so that the two ends of his bow meet; his left hand is touched by the point of fiery gold, his right breast by the string: the arrow does not begin to hiss through the air before Julio has felt it inside his heart.” (Poliziano).
  • The exerpt describes Cupid as powerful and swift, managing to catch Julio without him even knowing. The text also makes it seems as though cupid is invisble to those around, so Botticelli places Cupid up high as though coming from the heavens. Cupid is also presnted mid-action, with his arm pulled back and ready to strike. Even though there is no Julio in this piece, Cupid's intentions remain clear.

“My husband stocked it with flowers, richly, And said: “Goddess, be mistress of the flowers.” Talk about how Botticelli represented Zephyrus turning the Nymph into the Goddess of Flowers. However, there is no Husband.” (Poliziano).

The text tells the story of the origin of the Goddess of Flowers, where the Nymph Chloris transforms into Flora. Botticelli represents this transformation from Nymph to Goddess by presenting a before and after version of the Nymph. The audience can see Zephyrus grab Chloris in one scene and her transformed into Flora in the next scene. There is also a difference in appearance that Botticelli touches upon, wherein Flroa appears regal and mature, and Chloris is more energetic and young. Flora is depicted throwing flowers from her dress, which represents the coming of spring. The text has no mention of the God Zephyrus by name, instead there is a "husband" that transforms Chloris into the Flora. Botticelli deviates from the text by representing Zephyrus instead of a husband, who transforms Chloris into Flora.

“She is fair-skinned, unblemished white, and white is her garment, though ornamented with roses, flowers, and grass; the ringlets of her golden hair descend on a forehead humbly proud. The whole forest smiles about her, and, as it may, lightens her cares; in her movement she is regally mild, her glance alone could quiet a tempest.” (Polizano).When comparing Botticelli's Venus with the original text, you can certainly see how Botticelli drew his Venus with this text in mind. The text describes her having golden hair ringlets and unblemished white skin. In Primavera, Venus stands at the center, looking out at the audience with a calm and serene expression. Botticelli captures how the "whole forest smiles about her" by creating a joyful scene with the Graces dancing together around her regal presence. She is very much an elegant presence and the epitome of Springtime.

One of the biggest differences from the original texts and Botticelli's Primavera is the replacement of Julio with Mercury. The original text describes cupid aiming his arrow at Julio, who falls in love with Venus. Instead, we see Mercury changing the weather to springtime while Cupid points his arrow towards one of the Graces instead. It is unclear why exactly Botticelli deviated from the original text, but the allegory of springtime and fertility could coincide with marriage, specifically of the 3 Graces. However, even with the removal of Julio, Cupid is still playing an active role in this piece, where Love and Springtime join together in purity.

To summarize, it is very clear that Botticelli was inspired by these two texts and closely followed the story it told. The meaning of Springtime and Venus, along with the luscious garden and the transformation of Chloris into Flora. All of these aspects are present in the texts and Botticelli perfectly encapsulates the feeling of an eternal spring where love and marriage is abound. He added his own touches to the story, choosing to opt out of representing Julio and painting Mercury instead, most probably due to him being the God of the month May and welcoming Spring. Venus, like in the text, is a central character to the story, and she stands regal and elegant; the embodiment of perfection as her Graces dance beside her. This is a beautiful piece that captures the essence of the texts with clarity and meaning.

  • Virtual Uffizi Gallery. (n.d.). Botticelli :: Spring characters :: Uffizi Gallery. https://www.virtualuffizi.com/the-characters-of-botticelli%E2%80%99s-primavera-.html
  • Original texts by Polizano and Ovid.

References