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Connectivity in the wetlands

Types of wetlands

Value of Wetlands

Threats to the Wetlands

In a hurry?Brief Wetland Overview

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Our Wetlands

Local Wetland Overview

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References

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Mackay

Mackay is home to many migratory birds and juvenile fish. It is also a pathway where sediments can be filtered from the Great Barrier Reef.

Cairns

Fitzroy

Home to 20 wetland areas, many of the waterways in Fitzroy are part of the Great Barrier Reef. This habitat is known for its seaturtle inhabitants.

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Local Wetland Overview

Townsville

Townsville has 4 main lakes, 3 main rivers, and 3 wetlands. Main wetlands include Town Common, Rowes Bay, and Borrow Pits. All wetlands have connectivity to the Great BArrier Reef

Home to the Cattana wetlands, this region holds immense biodiversity with its combination of fresh and salt water areas. It is known to be a refuge for many species as other wetlands become threatened by human activity.

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Importance

Threats

Connectivity

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Wetlands in a hurry

Each wetland environment plays an interconnective part in the network of all wetland environment. Many species use the wetlands as waterways to diff erent habitats and migrate throughout the year. Disprupting one habitat can effect all wetlands.

Human activity can disrupt the connectiviy of wetlands by introducing invasive sepices, polluting the environment or creating pysical barriers within the wetland environment.

The Aboriginal people of our nation maintained high importance of prserving our wetlands. Our wetlands provide natural resources such as water and food to our communities. Wetlands pplay a key role in the carbon cycle and also imporves water quality.

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Lacustrine

Riverine

Subterranean

Marine

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Types of Wetlands

Wetland habitat located within a channel of water

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Wetland habitat located in the ocean, coast or estuaries.

Wetland habitat located under the ground and provide ground water to other babitats

Wetland habitat located in a large open area such as lakes and dams. ( artifical or natrually occurring)

Welcome to Queensland!

We are home to some of the most beautiful and diverse species. With our growing population, there agriculture has taken much of the space that used to be wild. To understand the connetivity between different aquatic environments, click on the Great Barrier Reef to begin your journey

Wetlandsand Catchment

Great Barrier Reef

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Wetland Connectivity

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Welcome tothe Great Barrier Reef! I am Mangrove Jack!

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I am born here in the reef, but I need to swim and inland to live and grow the rivers and wetlands.

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Go upstream

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I have made it inland! With agricultural runoff in the catchment, I can't I won't be able to make it to the wetlands. The herbicides killed all of my food sources, and make this habitat inhabitable.

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Good day! I am a short tail eel. I live upstream in the freshwater wetlands off of the reef.

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Welcome to upstream

Since agriculture has boomed, there is less food in my home. Most of my food comes from the salt water. Now I see less and less of the Mangrove Jack that I love to eat.

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Threats to the Wetlands

Urban development

Water level change

Agricultural Devlopment

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Invasive Species

Urban devlopment

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The development of communities creates physical barriers in many of our wetlands such as dams. This prohibits many species' natural path of migration. With these barriers, fish are not able to breed and there is reduction of food sources for other species. This creates disbalance among all wetlands

Agriculture Development

Not only is the development of agriculture destroy wetland areas, but it can also be a major pollutor of wetland areas. The use of pesticides, fertilizers, and herbicides end up in our wetlands, and are carried to its outlets. Fertilizer for example can increase the population of phytoplanketon, causing rapid deoxygination in the aquatic environments.

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Water level changes

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Often a result of development or climate change, water levels rapidly change, causing floods and droughts. Droughts, for example cause lack of flow during migration season, causing a population decrease. Flooding can cause influx of invasive species or overconsumption of certain foodsources. This can be combatted by providing dams.

Invasive Species

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Invasive species are usually introduced by human activity such as transoportation of goods or traveling. Some invasive plants such as water ferns create physical barriers when they spawn. This can be a barrier to migration in the wetlands. Introduction of new fish species can threaten native species' space and food sources. This offsets the balance of all wetlands.

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Value of Wetlands

Wetlands allow for improvement of water quality

The wetlands were originally the land of many indiginous tribes. Protecting and managing the wetlands is central to their community values. We recognize the cultural and economic importance of the wetlands.

Habitat to many crustaceans, fish, and birtds

Store carbon dioxide, critical for the carbon cycle

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Provide food, water for humans and animals,

Provide a barrier against errosion and flooding

References

  • D., E., PEGGY A. QUINN, JAMES A. GLAZEWSKI, KRISTA. (2019). 20. In Id casebook: Case studies in instructional design. essay, ROUTLEDGE.
  • Environment, D. of the. (1970, January 1). Wetlands and indigenous values. DCCEEW. https://www.dcceew.gov.au/water/wetlands/publications/factsheet-wetlands-indigenous-values
  • Wetland Management. (Department of Environment and Science). (n.d.). https://wetlandinfo.des.qld.gov.au/wetlands/management/
  • Wetlands of queensland - our publications: Queensland museum. Our publications | Queensland Museum. (n.d.). https://www.museum.qld.gov.au/about/our-publications/wetlands-of-queensland

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