Want to make creations as awesome as this one?

Transcript

Moving Forward

StudySync | Grade 10 | Unit 2

Genre Knowledge

Writing Skills

Reading Skills

Ancient & Classical Literary Period Hero's Journey Allegory Epic Poem Literary Criticism Argumentative Texts

Word MeaningConnotation & Denotation Context Clues Central or Main IdeaInformational Text Elements & Structures Poetic Elements & Structure Logical Fallacies Reasons & Evidence Summarizing Textual Evidence

Organizing Informational Writing Introductions Thesis Statemetns Supporting Details Conclusions Colons & Semicolons Parallel Structure Precise Language Prepositions & Prepositional Phrases

Learning Map

Moving ForwardHow does culture shape our goals?

by reading...

by reading...

by writing...

by reading...

to answer...

to understand...

to discuss...

The Classics

Argumentative Texts

Narrative Texts

Informational Text

The Hero's Journey

Conventions & Style

What motivates us?

Individual & Community

Organize Information

revising for...

structuring to...

Narratives we'll read include:

  • "The Gathering Place" (poem)
  • Night (novel excerpt)
  • "Civil Peace" (short story)

We'll read the following informational texts as models:

  • The Power of the Hero's Journey
  • Valedictorian Speech
  • Night (autobiographical account)

To think about what motivates us and reflect on how and why people pursue goals, we will read:

  • Valedictorian Address at Anacostia High School
  • Methods of Motivation

We'll use our texts as springboards for a Socratic Seminar about the relationship between individual goals and community or cultural goals.

We'll read "Ramayana" and "The Cave" from The Republic.

We'll learn how to refine our style through:

  • colons
  • semicolons
  • parallel structure
  • precise language
  • prepositions & prepositional phrases

We'll learn how to organize informative writing by focusing on:

  • Thesis statements
  • Supporting Details
  • Introductions
  • Transitions
  • Conclusions

How does culture influence your goals?

Individual & Community

What motivates us?

The Power of the Hero's Journey

Big Idea

Informational Writing

Big Idea

01

Blast: How does culture influence your goals?

02

Literary Focus: The Classics

03

Recognizing Genre: Argumentative Texts

04

Academic Vocabulary

05:00

The Power of the Hero's Journey

  • The protagonist can be referred to as its hero. What are some stories you know well that have a strong protagonist?
  • Take one of those stories. Make a list of what happens to the hero over the course of the story.
  • Share your list with your group. Identify commonalities between the experiences of your heroes.

Introduction

  • What qualities or experiences are typically associated with a hero?
  • How might heroes and their journeys look different?
  • What aspects of heroes and their journeys are common across time and space?

The Power of the Hero's Journey

  • Joseph Campbell was an influential author and professor whose theories on mythology and the human psyche had a profound impact on literature, psychology, and religion. His scholarship focused on comparative mythology, a discipline aimed at identifying shared themes of human experience in myths from a variety of cultures.
  • Campbell's influence spread due to a popular TV documentary series called Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth on PBS in 1988. The series included six conversations that covered topics such as creation myths and the archetype of the hero's journey.
  • Campbell's ideas also found their way into popular culture. Filmmaker George Lucas used concepts from the hero's journey to draft the first Star Wars movie.
  • Christopher Vogler wrote The Writer's Journey as an internal memo at Walt Disney Animation Studios while developing The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast, all based on Campbell's ideas. It became required reading for Disney Feature's creative executives and became their gospel for creating stories for the coming decades.

Background

Process

The Power of the Hero's Journey

2

Expert Group

Become an expert on a stage of the Hero's Journey.Summarize key ideas about each part of your stage so you can share them with your home group.

3

4

Home Group

Collaborative Group Project

5

Teach your group about your stage of the Hero's Journey.Learn from your other group members about the other stages.

Compare & Contrast

View model; Illustrate how ONE story your group is familiar with demonstrates the hero's journey. Demonstrate at least 9 steps with a picture for each.

Compare & contrast your story's heroic journey with another group's heroic journey.

1

Structural Guide

What do you notice about how the text is structured? How does this structure help us identify the writer's main ideas or claims and examine how they develop?

The Hero's Journey

Stage 1: Departure

Stage 2: Initiation

Stage 3: Return

The Hero's Journey:Aladdin

Stage 1: Departure

Stage 2: Initiation

Stage 3: Return

Phase 1: Departure

The Call to Adventure

An old man convinces Aladdin to go to the Cave of Wonder in order to have a chance with Jasmine and escape his life of poverty.

Refusal of the Call

Aladdin debates turning back because he does not trust the old man.

Supernatural Aid

Aladdin meets the Genie for the first time who helps him achieve his "dreams"

The Belly of the Whale

Aladdin is transformed into a prince in apperance.

Meeting of the Goddess

Aladdin meets Jasmine again on her turf to try to win her over because he is now "rich."

The Road of Trials

Aladdin is faced with his identity being revealed, but is mostly able to hide it except from Jafar.

Temptation

Aladdin, fearful he will lose the Genie, locks him away.

Phase 2: Initiation

Atonement

Aladdin finally decides that he can no longer pretend to be what he isn't, planning to tell Jasmine the truth.

Apotheosis

Aladdin accepts himself as a street-rat and uses the skills he learned to save the girl and friends he loves.

Phase 3: Return

Master of Two Worlds

Aladdin returns to the world and himself to balance by freeing the Genie from the lamp, resulting in freedom of his fear of worthlessness.

The Ultimate Boon

Aladdin faces Jafar, proving that a lowly street-rat can be just as powerful.

Freedom to Live

Now that the world is in balance, Aladdin would return to his old life, but the Sultan changes the law allowing him to marry Jasmine.

Are Goals Overrated?

What Motivates Us?

Valedictorian Speech

Methods of Motivation

Goals vs. Systems

Valedictorian Speech

3

4

Essential Question

Discussion

5

How does this text connect to the unit's essential question: "How does culture influence your goals?"

Quiz

  1. Why is Melson not intimidated by the fact that life is not fair?
  2. What qualities does Melson list ofr her fellow graduates as the key to unlocking their future?

Complete the digital reading quiz in StudySync individually.

1

Pre-Reading

What qualities make someone a positive influence in your life?What are some goals you have after high school?

2

Read & Annotate

  • Make 3 connections to your personal experiences.
  • Based on the context, what do you think each bolded word means?
  • Pick 1 unfamiliar vocabulary word to define.

Response Options

A: Write a letter to someone who has provided guidance and support in your life. Explain the impact they have had on your life with specific examples, as Melson did in for her track coach.

B: You could be a freshman mentor next year. Write a letter or speech for an incoming freshman next year with advice for how to succeed in high school.

C: Create a vision board that represents your personal aspirations. Include at least 10 images and 5 words that represent who/what you want your life to be. On the back, reflect on how your community and culture have influenced your aspirations as you work on your vision board.

What motivates you?

If you want someone to do something, you have to give them a reward or recognition; otherwise, they won't have a reason to feel invested in the task.

Strongly Disagree

Agree

Strongly Agree

Disagree

What motivates you?

Pressure from external sources (parents, coaches, peers, etc.) is more motivating than internal pressure (personal goals, growth, learning new skills, etc.).

Strongly Disagree

Agree

Strongly Agree

Disagree

What motivates you?

Doing something for a reward or a grade can make you lose interest in it.

Strongly Disagree

Agree

Strongly Agree

Disagree

What motivates you?

Enjoying what you do is better for learning than doing it for a reward or a grade.

Strongly Disagree

Agree

Strongly Agree

Disagree

What motivates you?

Your personal motivation is the best way to ensure creative problem solving and steady, continuous growth.

Strongly Disagree

Agree

Strongly Agree

Disagree

  • Intrinsic Motivation
  • Extrinisic Motivation
  • Overjustification Effect
  • Habit Stacking

Methods of Motivation

Intrinsic Motivation Stations

Read & annotate the text (56-62).

  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of bolded vocabulary terms; note unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Ask 3 questions about the passage that may be unclear or unresolved.
  • Summarize the top 5 key ideas from the text.

Intrinsic Motivation: Walk & Talk Discussion

  1. In groups of 3, work your way around the room to quietly discuss the BLUE questions.
  2. Record a summary of your answer on the answer sheet.

C: PAIRS Online Station: SS Grammar: Parallel Structure

  1. Review the terms in the Vocab chart.
  2. Read & annotate the Model.
  3. Discuss the Model w/ the PINK questions. Record your answers on the answer sheet.
  4. Complete the "Your Turn" task. Use my reference sheet for #3 as needed.

D: Teacher Station: Quick Check-in

  • I'll call you over one at a time. My goal is to see EVERYONE, not just Ds/Fs.
  • We'll briefly discuss your goals, Q2 grade, book conference needs/schedule, and any late work you can/should still do.

EXPECTATIONS

  1. Work on the task quietly within your groups. You'll have 10 mins.
  2. Transition to the next station task within 30 sec.
  3. Questions? Ask 3 before me.
  4. If you don't finish a station, you'll need to finish it for HW.

Extrinsic Motivation: Walk & Talk Discussion

  1. In groups of 3, work your way around the room to quietly discuss the GREEN questions.
  2. Record a summary of your answer on the answer sheet.

Methods of Motivation

Extrinsic Motivation Stations

A: PAIRS Offline Station: Read & annotate the text (60-62).

  • Use context clues to determine the meaning of bolded vocabulary terms; note unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Ask 3 questions about the passage that may be unclear or unresolved.
  • Summarize the top 5 key ideas from the text.

B: TRIO Offline Station: Walk & Talk Discussion

  1. In groups of 3, work your way around the room to quietly discuss the GREEN questions.
  2. Record a summary of your answer on the answer sheet.

C: SOLO Online Station: StudySync Skill: Reasons & Evidence

  1. Watch the SS video about reasons & evidence OR review the terms in the text below--> complete the vocab tab.
  2. Add the 4 terms to your Literary Toolbox, along with definitions in your own words and examples.
  3. Watch the Skill TV Model about counterarguments.
  4. Complete the "Your Turn" task.

D: GROUP Teacher Station: Argument Deconstruction

  • Sit at the front table groups. Bring your book and pencil.
  • We'll work together to deconstruct the argument's claims, counterclaims, and evidence.

  • identify and restate a text's key ideas and details.
  • use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase
  • use informational text structure to analyze how an author's ideas or claims are developed or refined
  • provide an objective summary of an informational text
  • explain how the archetype of the hero's journey applies to a text or movie we've encountered

We will learn how to...

Key Concept: The Hero's Journey

Essential Question

How does culture influence your goals?

The most exciting stories are the ones with plots that keep moving forward. Readers eagerly turn the pages in order to find out what happens next. Like a good story, history also moves forward. Yet, as individuals and as members of various cultural groups, we often look at the past in order to figure out where we came from and what led us to the place where we are now. The past influences how we move forward as individuals, as a community, and as a culture.

  • How does culture influence your goals?
  • What do readers learn by reading about past and present struggles?
  • What do these stories teach us about ourselves and the impact our culture has on our lives and our goals?

  • make personal connections to a text
  • identify key ideas
  • cite key details that support specific key ideas
  • analyze the characteristics and structural elements of argumentative texts, including reasons and arguments
  • identify and analyze the effects of logical fallacies used in an argument
  • participate in a collaborative conversation

We will learn how to...

Key Skills: Arguments

Introduction Discussion

  • What are some examples of argumentative texts we've read?
  • What techniques make a convincing argument? Why?
Vocabulary
  • Capture key terms in our Literary Toolbox
  • Complete the vocabulary chart

Literary Criticism & Argumentative Texts

Skill: Recognizing Genre

Goal: Identify and describe characteristics of literary criticism and argumentative texts.

Skill Model

  • Create a Venn Diagram
  • What are some features shared by argumentative lectures, speeches, essays, and interviews?
  • What is the purpose of literary criticism?
  • How can identifying features of an argumentative text help us make decisions about an author's claim?
Your Turn
  • Complete the chart to demonstrate your understanding of argumentative texts as an informational genre.

How does culture influence your goals?

Informational Writing Prompt

From this unit or the previous unit, select three texts in which cultures face a challenge.In an informative essay, describe the challenge and how specific individuals aim to help their culture overcome that challenge.Analyze how the goals of the individual are connected to the goals of their culture.

Your writing should include:

  • an introduction with a topic, main idea, and thesis statement
  • appropriate formatting to organize complex ideas, concepts, or information
  • body paragraphs with supporting details, including evidence from multiple sources (ICE: introduce, cite, and explain), avoiding overly relying on one source
  • transitions between and within paragraphs
  • a formal style and objective tone
  • a conclusion that follows from the information presented.

  1. Read: Meet in your EXPERT groups to read your section.
  2. Summarize: Develop a list of key points that summarize the main ideas in that section. YOU will become the expert on that topic.
  3. Teach: Meet in your HOME groups to teach them about what you've learned and to learn from them about their sections.
  4. Assess: Complete the group question trail. You should only go to each question once, so if you go to a question a second time, you've missed a question and must figure out your mistake.

Literary Focus: The Classics - Jigsaw

  • write our own narrative conveying our ideal world.
  • write a short narrative to demonstrate how a character or person can use language to remember a painful experience.
  • write a short response demonstrating how outside research shapes our understanding of a text.

We will learn how to...

Key Skills: Narratives

How does culture influence your goals?

Blast: Moving Forward

  • Read and annotate the background information.
  • Then craft your "Blast" and respond to the QuikPoll.
  • Review and respond to at least 2 peer responses.

  1. Read: Meet in your EXPERT groups to read your section.
  2. Summarize: Develop a list of key points that summarize the main ideas in that section. YOU will become the expert on that topic.
  3. Teach: Meet in your HOME groups to teach them about what you've learned and to learn from them about their sections.
  4. Assess: Complete the group question trail. You should only go to each question once, so if you go to a question a second time, you've missed a question and must figure out your mistake.

Literary Focus: The Classics - Jigsaw

Preview the list of academic vocabulary terms. These terms may up again in Close Reading prompts, which means you'll need to be able to use them as you write about and analyze texts. Review the Model that groups and contextualizes these terms. How would you test if a word is being used correctly in context? Complete the "Your Turn" practices.

Illustrating Comparisons

Academic Vocabulary

Text C

Text A

Text B

  • make personal connections to a text
  • identify and describe key characteristics of the Ancient and Classical literary period.
  • identify and describe characteristics of literary criticism and argumentative texts.
  • recognize and use ten academic vocabulary words for illustrating comparisons in a variety of contexts.

We will learn how to...

Key Skills: The Classics