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Transcript

Sentence Anagrams

Write words on cards and put them in random order. Ask students to arrange the words into a complete sentence.

Two

equal

one

three.

Yesterday,

after

is

to

the zoo

went to

plus

lunch.

we

Sentence Anagrams

If you have a complex sentence, show how to first identify the verb, candidates for the subject, and then grouping words into phrases.

Example sentences:

  • I can be a good friend by sharing my pens.
  • I can be a good friend by listening to my classmates.
  • My dog is wet because it was raining.
  • My dog is happy because he got some food.

Sentence Elaboration

Start with a simple subject, and prompt students to elaborate on it with a series of questions, using six question words (i.e., who, what, why, when, where, how).

  • Who: An albatross
  • What kind of albatross: A parent albatross
  • What about it: A parent albatross might fly thousands of kilometers.
  • Why: To find food for its young.
  • When: Every day

A parent albatross might fly thousands of kilometers to find food for its young every day.

Sentence Combining

Start with combining two short and simple sentences. Ask students to explain their decisions to foster metalinguistic awareness*.

  • Iguanas are cold-blooded.
  • Turtles are cold-blooded.

Both iguanas and turtles are cold-blooded.

*being able to use and describe linguistic rules and patterns

I am looking for my umbrella because it is raining outside.

  • I am looking for my umbrella.
  • It is raining outside.

Sentence Combining

Start with combining two short and simple sentences. Ask students to explain their decisions to foster metalinguistic awareness*.

*being able to use and describe linguistic rules and patterns

  • Does information overload make an employee more or less efficient?
  • Researchers are trying to determine this.

Researchers are trying to determine if information overload makes an employee more or less efficient.

Good job! Can you tell me why you added 'if' to start the second part of the sentence?

Sentence Transform-ations

Have students practice generating questions from statements and vice versa. Be sure to model and show examples.

  • We are going outside for recess.

  • Could we have done it differently?

We could have done it differently.

  • We are going to listen with our mouths closed and ears open.

How are we going to listen?

Are we going outside for recess?

Conjunctions & Signal Words

After discussing conjunctions and signal words (e.g., because, but, so, while), have students complete a part of a sentence to show how phrases or clauses are joined.

  • Jake woke up late today, so_____
  • Jake woke up late today, but ____

  • While a solid is a matter that has its own shape, a liquid _____

  • We should do our very best even if it's _______.

Conjunctions & Signal Words

  1. Give students key information that needs to be included in a sentence.
  2. Show how the information can be combined using and and but.
  3. Ask students to write similar sentences about themselves.

She likes rap music but does not like classical music. She likes soccer but does not like baseball.She likes Indian food and Mexican food.

Look at the following information about Sophia's likes ( ) and dislikes ( ). Read the sentences that follow.

Music: rap music ( ), classical music ( )Sport: baseball ( ), soccer ( )Food: Indian food ( ), Mexican food ( )

Your turn! Write similar sentences about what music, sport, and food you like. Use and and but.

Two

equal

one

three.

is

to

plus

After discussing conjunctions (e.g., because, but, so), have students complete a part of a sentence to show how phrases or clauses are joined.

What can we do to ensure that these activities are motivating and meaningful to students?

Sedita (2020)

Tips for Sentence Anagrams

  • Start with a few words (3 to 4) and gradually expand the number of words and the complexity of the sentence structure.
  • Scaffold the task by capitalizing the first word of the sentence and including punctuation after the last word.

After discussing conjunctions (e.g., because, but, so), have students complete a part of a sentence to show how phrases or clauses are joined.

Sedita (2020)

Tips for Sentence & Word Selection: Use...

  • Sentences from text used for reading or read-aloud
  • Sentences related to everyday classroom experiences (e.g., morning message: I can be a good friend by...)
  • Words from recent phonics or spelling lessons (e.g.,Ted was mad.)
  • Newly learned vocabulary terms or concepts (e.g., Two plus one is equal to three, Turtles are cold-blooded.)

What can we do to ensure that these activities are motivating and meaningful to students?