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Transcript

1

LETRS

A Look at the Four-Part Processing Model

A Little About Me

2

5

Final Thoughts

3

4

The Reading Brain

Four-Part Processing Model

3 Cueing vs. 4 Processors

Olivia Broxey-Jones, Ed.D.Literacy Specialist

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My Favorite Children's Book

SOR "she-ro"Lyn Stone

"Ah-ha" Moment:The challenge of reading, especially for beginning readers, is to figure out how print relates to spoken language.

SOR Book & Professional Learning

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Figure 1.7 The Four-Part Processing Model for Word Recognition (Based on Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989)

Recognition of Letters

Sound Associations

Next

Interprets the meaning of words in and out of context

Interacts and supports the meaning processor; provides the referent for a word's meaning

Phonics

Now It's Your Turn

Simple View of Reading

WordRecognition

LanguageComprehension

X

Reading Comprehension

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  • The phonological and orthographic processors are not distinguished
  • Phonology and phonics are minimized
  • Skilled readers read words as a whole, not letter by letter

Three-Cueing System:

*Example

casual - causal conservation - conversation

Four Processors:

  • Four processors in the left hemisphere of the brain perform specific interconnected tasks for word recognition

Next

  • Simple View of Reading
    • WR x LC = RC

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Final Thoughts

"... attention to small units in early reading instruction is helpful for all learners, harmful for none, and crucial for some."

Snow & Juel, 2005 (in The Science of Reading: A handbook)

Snowling, M. J., & Hulme, C. (Eds.). (2005). The science of reading: A handbook. Blackwell Publishing.

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The rodeo rider leaped onto the back of his h_____ .

“I don’t recognize this word, but what would make sense? In the context of the sentence and what I know, it would make sense if this word were 'horse'.

Semantic Cues

Back

"The word must be a noun, it couldn’t be a verb such as 'horsing'. Let's skip this word for now and keep reading to see if the next few sentences offer some clues to what it might be.'

Syntactic Cues

"What word makes sense? The word 'horse' begins with an 'h', and that matches the picture that I see."

Graphophonic Cues