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Transcript

Timeline of the

~1384

John Wycliffe

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Protestant Reformation

Read through this timeline to find out about all the players of the Protestant Reformation

1517

Martin Luther

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~1530

John Calvin

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~1415

Jan Hus

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1525-1535

William Tyndale

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Complete your notes by clicking the + or +info buttons above!Click the arrows to scroll forwards or backwards on the timeline.

Timeline of the

1534

King Henry VIII

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Protestant Reformation

Read through this timeline to find out about all the players of the Protestant Reformation

1536

Martin Bucer

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1545-1648

Catholic Reformation / Counter Reformation

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1536

Menno Simons

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1545

Council of Trent

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Complete your notes by clicking the + or +info buttons above!Click the arrows to scroll forwards or backwards on the timeline.

Timeline of the

1553-1603

Queen Mary vs Queen Elizabeth

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Protestant Reformation

Read through this timeline to find out about all the players of the Protestant Reformation

Early 1560s

Huguenots

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1729

John Wesley

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1560

John Knox

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1618-1648

Thirty Years War

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Complete your notes by clicking the + or +info buttons above!Click the arrows to scroll forwards or backwards on the timeline.

Denominations of Christianity

Catholicism

Eastern Orthodox Church

Roman Catholic Church

Protestantism

Lutheranism

Church of England

Calvinism

Anabaptists

Amish

Baptists

Mennonites

Quakers

Methodists

Episcopalians

Pentecostal

Presbyterian

Martin Luther and his 95 Theses helped lead to people separating from the Roman Catholic Church in protests. They were called Protestants. This is known as the Protestant Reformation.

After Martin Luther helped start the Protestant Reformation, there continued to be disagreements on how Christians should practice their religion and what they should believe. This created more denominations of Christianity. Here are a few of them.

For more information, go to the first page of the timeline and click on Martin Luther.

For more information, go to the first page of the timeline and click on John Calvin.

For more information, go to the third page of the timeline and click on John Knox.

For more information, go to the second page of the timeline and click on King Henry VIII.

For more information, go to the third page of the timeline and click on John Wesley.

For more information on Anabaptists and all of the denominations created from it, go to the second page of the timeline and click on Menno Simons.

Martin Bucer

1536

Early Life: Martin Bucer was born in France in 1491. He became a Dominican monk, a religious order within the Catholic Church. However, as he studied the Bible and learned more about the Reformation, he started questioning some of the church's teachings.Conversion to Protestantism: Bucer left the Dominican order and became a Protestant, which means he believed in reforming the Catholic Church. He moved to the city of Strasbourg in Germany, where he joined the Reformation movement.Bridge Builder: Bucer was known for his efforts to bring different Protestant groups together. He believed that unity among Christians was important, even if they had some differences in their beliefs. He worked to create a sense of community among them.Reforming Worship: Bucer made changes in the way churches worshipped. He encouraged simple and meaningful church services that focused on the Bible and the teachings of Jesus. He believed that worship should be understandable to regular people.Teaching and Writing: Bucer wrote many books and articles explaining his beliefs and ideas. He was a respected teacher who influenced many people during the Reformation.Legacy: Martin Bucer's work paved the way for unity among various Protestant groups. His efforts to bring people together and promote a more thoughtful and meaningful worship experience left a lasting impact on the Reformation.In summary, Martin Bucer was a peacemaker and bridge builder during the Reformation. He believed in unity among Christians and worked to create a sense of community among different Protestant groups. His ideas continue to influence Christian communities today.

Martin Luther

1517

Early Life: Martin Luther was born in Germany in 1483. He came from a simple family and, as a young boy, he dreamed of becoming a lawyer. But something unexpected happened that changed his life.A Pious Monk: When Martin was 21, he got caught in a terrible storm while traveling. Terrified for his life, he prayed to God, promising to become a monk if he survived. He did, and so he became a monk in the Catholic Church.Questioning the Church: As a monk, Luther studied the Bible intensely. He began to have doubts about some of the church's teachings. One big issue was the sale of "indulgences," which were like tickets that people bought to get into heaven. Luther thought this was wrong.Ninety-Five Theses: In 1517, Luther wrote a list of 95 arguments against the sale of indulgences. He posted them on the door of a church in Wittenberg, Germany. This action, known as the "95 Theses," started a big debate about the church's practices.The Reformation: Luther's ideas spread like wildfire thanks to the printing press. People began to agree with him and started to break away from the Catholic Church. This movement became known as the Protestant Reformation.Translating the Bible: Luther believed everyone should be able to read the Bible, not just priests. So, he translated the Bible from Latin into German, making it accessible to ordinary people.Challenges and Changes: Luther faced many challenges and was even excommunicated from the Catholic Church. But he continued to teach and write about his beliefs. His followers, known as Lutherans, formed a new branch of Christianity.Legacy: Martin Luther's ideas had a massive impact on the world. His courage in challenging the church's practices led to the birth of various Protestant denominations, changing the course of history.In the end, Martin Luther was a bold thinker who stood up for what he believed was right. His actions and ideas continue to influence Christianity and the world today, reminding us that one person can make a significant difference.

John Calvin

~1530

Early Life: John Calvin was born in France in 1509. He grew up in a Catholic family and was a bright student. He went to college to study law, but his life would take a different path.A Change of Heart: As Calvin studied the Bible, he started questioning some of the Catholic Church's teachings. He became a Protestant, which means he believed in reforming the church.Writing and Teaching: Calvin wrote books and papers explaining his beliefs. He believed in the idea of predestination, which means that God already knows who will be saved. He also thought that people should have a say in how their churches were run. Geneva: Calvin had to leave France because of his beliefs and settled in the city of Geneva, Switzerland. There, he became a leader of the Reformation. He helped create a new kind of church, called the Reformed Church emphasizing salvation through grace and good works.Calvin's Ideas: His teachings became known as Calvinism. They included the idea that the Bible was the ultimate authority and that people should live good, disciplined lives. While in Geneva, Calvin set up a Consistory. The Consistory was a court that enforced moral discipline. Genevan citizens could be punished for "crimes" like dancing, swearing, and playing cards.Education: Calvin believed that education was important, and he helped establish schools in Geneva. His ideas about education influenced the development of public education in many places.Legacy: John Calvin's ideas spread across Europe and even to America. Many churches and denominations, like Presbyterian and Reformed churches, were inspired by his teachings.In the end, John Calvin was a thinker and teacher who played a big role in shaping the Reformation and the way many people think about religion today. His legacy continues through the churches and educational systems he influenced.

Catholic Reformation (aka Counter Reformation)

1545-1648

Background: In the 16th century, the Catholic Church was facing challenges from the Protestant Reformation, which had led to a split in Christianity. People were leaving the Catholic Church and joining Protestant denominations.The Catholic Church's Response: In response to the Protestant movement, the Catholic Church initiated the Catholic Reformation. This was a time when the Church made changes and reforms to address some of the problems within its own ranks.Key Elements of the Catholic Reformation:

  • Council of Trent: The Council of Trent was a series of meetings where Church leaders discussed and decided on important matters. They clarified Catholic teachings and reaffirmed the authority of the Pope and tradition alongside the Bible.
  • Reforming Clergy: The Church took steps to improve the education and behavior of its clergy (priests and bishops). This was important to address concerns about the behavior of some church leaders.
  • Missionary Work: The Catholic Church focused on spreading Christianity to different parts of the world. Missionaries were sent to places like Asia, Africa, and the Americas to convert people to Catholicism.
  • New Religious Orders: New religious orders like the Jesuits were founded to help the Church's mission. These groups emphasized education and missionary work.
Legacy: The Catholic Reformation helped the Catholic Church become stronger and more unified. It clarified its teachings, improved the behavior of clergy, and expanded its reach to new places. The reforms and changes made during this period continue to shape the Catholic Church today.Impact: The Catholic Reformation played a significant role in the revitalization of the Catholic Church and its response to the challenges posed by the Protestant Reformation. It strengthened the Church's identity and helped it regain some of the followers it had lost.In summary, the Catholic Reformation was a time when the Catholic Church responded to the Protestant Reformation by making changes and improvements. It clarified its teachings, reformed its clergy, and expanded its missionary efforts, leaving a lasting impact on the Catholic Church's history and identity.

John Wesley

1729

Early Life: John Wesley was born in 1703 in England. He came from a religious family, and his father was a minister. Wesley studied at Oxford University and was ordained as a priest in the Church of England.Spiritual Awakening: While at Oxford, Wesley and his brother Charles started a religious group called the "Holy Club." It was during this time that Wesley had a profound spiritual experience, feeling his heart "strangely warmed." This experience deepened his faith and led him to embark on a mission to share Christianity with others.Preaching and Outdoor Ministry: John Wesley became known for his passionate sermons and open-air preaching. He believed that the message of Jesus should reach people outside the church walls, so he often preached in fields, marketplaces, and open spaces.Methodism: Wesley's approach to Christianity became known as Methodism. He stressed the importance of living a disciplined and methodical Christian life. Methodists met in small groups to study the Bible, pray, and support one another in their faith.Social Justice: John Wesley was not only concerned with spiritual matters but also with social issues. He spoke out against slavery, poverty, and inequality. He believed that Christians should work to make the world a better place.Legacy: John Wesley's work laid the foundation for the Methodist Church, which became a global Christian denomination. Today, Methodists continue to emphasize personal devotion, social justice, and community involvement.In summary, John Wesley was a passionate preacher and leader who founded the Methodist movement. His beliefs in personal devotions, social justice, and community have had a lasting impact on the Methodist Church and continue to influence Christian communities worldwide.

Menno Simons

1536

Early Life: Menno Simons was born in the Netherlands in 1496. He grew up in a Catholic family and became a priest when he was young. But something happened that changed his life forever.Questioning the Church: Like other reformers of his time, Menno Simons began to have doubts about some of the Catholic Church's teachings and practices. He believed that people should be baptized as adults, not as infants, and that the church should be separate from the state.Anabaptists: Menno Simons joined a group known as the Anabaptists. They believed in adult baptism and were considered radical (extreme) by the Catholic and Protestant churches of the time. The name "Anabaptist" means "re-baptizer" because they baptized people again as adults.Preacher and Leader: Menno Simons became a preacher and leader among the Anabaptists. He traveled around Europe, spreading his beliefs and helping Anabaptist communities grow.Persecution: Being an Anabaptist wasn't easy. Both the Catholic Church and other Protestant groups persecuted them because of their beliefs. Many Anabaptists faced imprisonment or even death.Legacy: Menno Simons's teachings and leadership left a lasting impact. Today, the Mennonite Church, which follows his beliefs, continues to exist worldwide. They emphasize peace, simplicity, and living out the teachings of Jesus.In the end, Menno Simons was a brave man who stood up for what he believed was right, even when it was dangerous. His legacy continues through the Mennonite Church, reminding us that individuals can make a big difference in the world. Baptists today originated from the Anabaptists. Modern groups within the Anabaptist movement are the Amish, Mennonites, and Hutterites.

William Tyndale

1525-1535

Early Days: William Tyndale was born in England around 1494. He grew up in a time when the Bible was mostly in Latin, a language that regular folks didn't understand. Tyndale believed that everyone should be able to read and learn from the Bible in their own language.Learning and Dreaming: Tyndale was a bright student. He went to Oxford University and later to Cambridge University. There, he became more interested in the Bible and its teachings.Bible Translation: Tyndale decided to translate the Bible into English so that everyone could read it. But it wasn't easy. The Church didn't like the idea because they wanted to control who could read and interpret the Bible.Fleeing Persecution: To avoid getting into trouble, Tyndale had to leave England and go to Europe. In places like Germany and the Netherlands, he worked hard to translate the Bible into English. His goal was to make it simple and clear, so regular people could understand it.The Printing Press: Thanks to the printing press, Tyndale's English Bible started to spread. Copies of his translations were secretly brought back to England. People were eager to read the Bible in their own language.Challenges and Capture: The Church didn't give up. They tried to capture Tyndale and stop his work. Sadly, in 1536, he was arrested and later executed for his beliefs.Legacy: William Tyndale's work wasn't in vain. His translations of the Bible became the basis for many later English translations, including the King James Version. Today, millions of people around the world can read and understand the Bible in English, thanks in large part to Tyndale's dedication and courage.In the end, William Tyndale was a brave man who believed that everyone should have access to the Bible in their own language. His legacy lives on in the pages of the English Bible, which continues to inspire and guide people to this day.

Queen Mary vs Queen Elizabeth

1553-1603

In the 16th century, two sisters, Queen Mary I and Queen Elizabeth I, ruled England, and their choices regarding religion had a significant impact on the Protestant Reformation. Let's explore their stories:

Queen Mary I: "Bloody Mary"Early Life: Mary was born in 1516 to King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon. She grew up in a time of religious change as her father separated from the Catholic Church to create the Church of England.Religious Beliefs: Mary was a devout Catholic, and when she became queen in 1553, she aimed to restore Catholicism in England.Actions: During her reign, Mary persecuted Protestants who disagreed with her beliefs. This led to many Protestants being burned at the stake, earning her the nickname "Bloody Mary."Legacy: Mary's efforts to restore Catholicism had limited success. Her harsh methods made many people resent her and led to a more Protestant England after her death in 1558.

Queen Elizabeth I: The Protestant QueenEarly Life: Elizabeth was born in 1533 to King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. She grew up in a time of religious turmoil and change.Religious Beliefs: Elizabeth was a Protestant, but she aimed to create a religious settlement that could bring together both Catholics and Protestants in England.Actions: Elizabeth's reign (1558-1603) saw the establishment of the Church of England as a Protestant church. She implemented policies that allowed for some religious freedom and tolerance.Legacy: Elizabeth's reign is often called the Elizabethan Religious Settlement. It helped stabilize England after years of religious conflict and set the stage for the development of Anglicanism, a form of Protestantism that continues to be the Church of England's tradition.

Comparison:

  • Religious Beliefs: Mary was a devout Catholic, while Elizabeth was a Protestant.
  • Actions: Mary tried to forcefully reintroduce Catholicism, while Elizabeth aimed for religious tolerance and stability.
  • Legacy: Mary's reign strengthened Catholicism temporarily, but Elizabeth's reign helped establish a more moderate form of Protestantism in England.
In summary, Queen Mary I and Queen Elizabeth I made different choices regarding religion during the Protestant Reformation. Mary tried to bring back Catholicism with force, earning a harsh reputation, while Elizabeth sought to find a middle ground that allowed for religious stability and tolerance in England, leaving a more lasting legacy.

Jan Hus

~1415

Early Life: Jan Hus was born in 1369 in a small village in what is now the Czech Republic. He was a bright student and went to the University of Prague, where he learned about religion and became a priest.Preaching for Change: Hus was a passionate preacher, and he had some ideas about the Church. He believed that the Church leaders were not always doing what was right and that they should follow the Bible more closely. He also thought that people should be able to take part in the church service in their own language, rather than in Latin, which most people didn't understand.Heresy Accusations: Jan Hus's ideas made some Church leaders unhappy. They accused him of heresy, which means going against the official teachings of the Church. Despite these accusations, Hus continued to speak out and gain followers who agreed with his ideas.The Council of Constance: In 1414, Hus was invited to a Church council in the city of Constance in what is now Germany. He hoped to explain his beliefs and clear his name. However, when he got there, he was arrested and put on trial.Martyr for His Beliefs: Sadly, Jan Hus was found guilty of heresy and was sentenced to death. On July 6, 1415, he was burned at the stake. His death was a powerful moment in history, and it made many people question the actions of the Church.Legacy: Even though Hus was gone, his ideas didn't die with him. His followers, known as Hussites, continued to spread his teachings. Eventually, they played a role in the Reformation, a movement that led to changes in the Church across Europe.Jan Hus was a brave man who stood up for what he believed was right, even when it was dangerous. His legacy continues to inspire people to question authority and seek religious reforms to this day.

Council of Trent

1545

Why It Happened: A long time ago, some people had questions and concerns about the Catholic Church. They started new groups, like the Protestants. The Church wanted to talk about these issues, so they called the Council of Trent.What They Did: At the Council of Trent, Church leaders talked about important things:

  • Scripture and Tradition: They said that the Bible and tradition were both really important for the Church.
  • Justification: They talked about how people become good with God. They said that having faith and doing good things were both important.
  • Sacraments: They confirmed that things like baptism, the Eucharist, and confession were still important.
  • Church Rules: They talked about how priests should learn and behave, and how to do Mass properly.
Results: The Council of Trent helped make the Catholic Church stronger. They made rules to follow and explained what the Church believed. They wanted to show that they were different from the new Protestant groups.Legacy: What they talked about at the Council of Trent still matters for the Catholic Church today. It helped make the Church stronger and clearer in its beliefs and practices.In short, the Council of Trent was a very big meeting for the Catholic Church. They talked about important things, made rules, and wanted to show they were different from the Protestants. This meeting still affects the Catholic Church today.

John Knox

1560

Early Life: John Knox was born in Scotland in 1514, a time when the country was deeply influenced by the Catholic Church. He grew up in a world where religion was central to people's lives.Conversion to Protestantism: Knox became a follower of the Protestant Reformation's ideas, inspired by reformers like Martin Luther and John Calvin. He believed that the Catholic Church needed change and that people should be able to read and understand the Bible themselves.Preaching and Teaching: Knox became a preacher and spread Protestant ideas across Scotland. His powerful sermons and writings influenced many people, including nobles and common folk.Conflict with Mary, Queen of Scots: Scotland was a Catholic country, and Knox's teachings didn't sit well with the Catholic Queen Mary (NOT Bloody Mary). He was captured and spent time as a prisoner. However, he continued his work after his release.Presbyterian Church: Knox was a leader in establishing the Presbyterian Church in Scotland. This church emphasized a simple form of worship and church government where ministers and elders worked together.Legacy: John Knox's efforts helped change Scotland's religious landscape. His Presbyterian ideas continue to shape the Church of Scotland, one of the country's largest Christian denominations.In summary, John Knox was a preacher and thinker who played a significant role in spreading Protestantism in Scotland. His ideas influenced the development of the Presbyterian Church and left a lasting impact on Scottish religious life.

King Henry VIII

1534

Early Life: Henry VIII was born in 1491 in England. He became king when he was just 18 years old, in 1509. At the time, England was a Catholic country, and the Pope in Rome had a lot of power over the church and the people.Desire for a Male Heir: King Henry wanted a son to inherit the throne, but his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, didn't give him one. He asked the Pope for an annulment, which is like a divorce in the eyes of the Church, but the Pope refused.The Church of England: Frustrated by the Pope's refusal, Henry decided to break away from the Catholic Church. In 1534, he declared that he, not the Pope, was the head of the Church in England. This new church was called the Church of England or the Anglican Church.Dissolution of Monasteries: Henry also wanted more power and money. He took control of the monasteries in England and sold their land and riches. This made him even wealthier.Religious Changes: Even though Henry had separated from the Catholic Church, the Church of England still had many Catholic practices. It wasn't until his son, Edward VI, became king that England became more Protestant in its beliefs.Legacy: King Henry VIII's actions had a lasting impact on England. The Church of England became a mix of Catholic and Protestant beliefs, and it remains the country's national church today. His break from the Catholic Church also played a part in the larger Protestant Reformation sweeping across Europe.In summary, King Henry VIII was a powerful king who wanted both a male heir and more control over his country. His decision to create the Church of England had far-reaching consequences for England's religious landscape and its role in the broader Protestant Reformation.

John Wycliffe

~1384

Early Life: John Wycliffe was born in the village of Wycliffe, England, around 1330. He grew up to be a smart guy and became a professor at Oxford University, where he taught about God and the Bible.The Bible in English: Back then, the Church's leaders spoke and wrote in Latin. This made it hard for regular people to understand the Bible because it was also in Latin. But John Wycliffe thought that everyone should be able to read and understand the Bible. So, he translated the Bible from Latin into English, making it easier for people to learn about God.Questioning the Church: Wycliffe also had questions about some of the Church's practices. He didn't like that some Church leaders were very rich while many people were poor. He thought the Church should be simpler and closer to what he believed Jesus had taught.Followers and Controversy: Many people liked what Wycliffe was saying. They became his followers, called "Lollards." But this made the Church leaders upset. They didn't like that Wycliffe was challenging their power.Legacy: John Wycliffe passed away in 1384, but his ideas lived on. His followers continued to spread his teachings, and his English Bible helped pave the way for future Bible translations into different languages. However, in 1415 (31 years after his death), the Roman Catholic Church declared him a heretic. His body was dug up, his remains were burned, and his ashes were thrown into the River SwiftIn the end, John Wycliffe was a brave thinker who wanted to make the Church better and the Bible more accessible to everyone. He left a lasting impact on the world, even though his ideas were controversial in his time.

Thirty Years War

1618-1648

The Thirty Years War, which raged across Europe in the 17th century, had its origins deeply intertwined with the Protestant Reformation. This complex and lengthy war had significant causes, effects, and a lasting legacy connected to the Reformation:

Causes:

  • Religious Division: The Protestant Reformation of the 16th century had created religious divisions across Europe. Protestantism challenged the authority of the Catholic Church, leading to religious tensions.
  • Political Power Struggles: The Reformation also ignited power struggles. Protestant rulers in some regions clashed with Catholic rulers over who would control religious matters and territories.
  • Bohemian Revolt: The conflict began in 1618 when Protestant nobles in Bohemia (part of the Holy Roman Empire) rebelled against their Catholic Habsburg ruler. This revolt triggered the war.

Effects:

  • Devastation: The war resulted in immense destruction, widespread famine, and deadly diseases. Entire regions were ravaged, and the suffering of the civilian population was severe.
  • Peace of Westphalia: In 1648, the war finally ended with the Peace of Westphalia. This peace treaty had significant consequences:
    • It recognized the independence of many states, allowing them to determine their own religion.
    • It marked a shift away from the authority of the Catholic Church in European affairs.
    • It established the foundation for the modern system of nation-states, where countries had more control over their own governance.

Legacy:

  • Religious Impact: The war reduced the power of the Catholic Church in Europe. It led to the recognition of religious diversity, allowing various faiths to coexist.
  • Political Transformation: The Peace of Westphalia laid the groundwork for modern European politics. It established the principle of state sovereignty, which remains a fundamental aspect of international relations today.
  • Continuing Conflicts: Although the war ended, it left a legacy of distrust and rivalries among European nations that would contribute to future conflicts, including the later wars of the 18th and 19th centuries.
In summary, the Thirty Years War, rooted in the religious tensions and power struggles sparked by the Protestant Reformation, had devastating effects and a profound legacy. It reshaped the religious and political landscape of Europe, leaving a lasting imprint on the continent's history.

Huguenots

Early 1560s

Who Were the Huguenots? The Huguenots were French Protestants who followed the teachings of the Reformation. They believed in many of the same ideas as other Protestant groups, such as salvation by faith alone and the authority of the Bible.Religious Conflict: France was a predominantly Catholic country at the time, and the Huguenots faced persecution and discrimination for their beliefs. This religious conflict led to a series of wars known as the French Wars of Religion, which lasted for several decades.St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre: One of the most tragic events in Huguenot history was the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre in 1572. On this day, thousands of Huguenots were killed in a brutal attack in Paris, ordered by the French monarchy.Edict of Nantes: Despite facing hardships, the Huguenots continued to practice their faith. In 1598, King Henry IV issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted them some religious freedom and the right to practice their religion openly.Revocation of the Edict: However, the religious peace didn't last. In 1685, King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes, leading to the persecution and forced conversion of many Huguenots. Thousands of Huguenots fled France to escape religious persecution (some came to the coast of North Carolina).Legacy: The Huguenots had a lasting impact not only on France but also on the countries they settled in, such as England, the Netherlands, and South Africa. They contributed to the societies they joined and left a mark on their new homes.In summary, the Huguenots were French Protestants who faced religious persecution during the Protestant Reformation. Despite their challenges, they continued to practice their faith and left a lasting legacy in France and beyond.

1054

The Great Schism

The Great Schism was a really big event in the history of Christianity that happened a long time ago. It was like a big break-up that split the Christian Church into two parts, the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. The split happened because they started to disagree on things like what they believed, how they practiced their faith, and who should be in charge. One big issue was about who had more power, the Pope in Rome or the Patriarch in Constantinople. In 1054, the tension between the two sides got really bad and they kicked each other out of the Church. The Western Church spoke Latin, while the Eastern Church spoke Greek. The Western Church followed the Pope as their leader, but the Eastern Church had many leaders called Patriarchs. They also had some differences in what they believed, like how they understood the Holy Spirit. The Great Schism made two different Christian groups: Roman Catholicism in the West and Eastern Orthodoxy in the East. Today, the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church are still separate Christian groups with their own beliefs, practices, and leaders. The Great Schism is still an important event in Christian history. It reminds us that problems can happen when people don't peacefully solve their differences in what they believe and who should be in charge.