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The ILC Sandwich explains the purposeful redundancy of the platform's design. Use this interactive navigation of the ILC to support your implementation of IM Curriculum

Curriculum Guide

Click on any button to discover the resources that are available on the ILC platform or Click "NEXT"

Platform Design

Overview Resources

Curriculum Content

Supporting Resources

Also, known as the Grade Band Landing Page

Navigation Bar

This navigation bar will be displayed and accessible throughout the Imagine Learning Classroom.

Start

Selecting this icon will open a search bar. You can simply type the title of a lesson, keyword, concepts, etc.. And then click the magnifying glass and the search results will display.

Displays all your classes that have been created including your students and any assignments that have been made and/or completed. We will talk more about this feature when we get into the lessons.

Contains the data that is collected by the ILC including scores on Illustrative Mathematics assignments or assessments that have been completed online

Allows you to access any lessons you have saved with less clicks then drilling down into the curriculum.

Directs you to the Platform Guides that will walk you through many of the different capabilities of ILC

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Hamburger Dropdown Contains: Home Page Grade Bands

Grade Band (K-5) Landing Page

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Curriculum Guide

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How do the materials support all learners? Learn more about built-in supports for diverse learners

Learn about the opportunities for formative and summative assessment

Find at-a-glance charts that outline unit and section dependencies within and across courses and a detailed scope and sequence for all grade levels.

How do you use the Materials Learn more about how instruction unfolds across a units and lessons and the routines and components that support daily instruction

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Grade Level (Course) Landing Page

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Centers

Virtual Manipulatives

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Unit Landing Page

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Lesson Navigation

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K-5 Unit Adaptation Packs

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What resources are being provided?

  • K-5 Unit Adaptation Packs are designed to give teachers guidance about how to address loss of familiarity with topics from the previous course.
  • These are created for each unit of each course and, where appropriate, references Imagine Learning Illustrative Mathematics lessons from prior courses that may be useful to remind students of concepts that will help them engage with the current, grade-level unit.
  • Each adaptation pack also contains student-facing lessons recommended from below grade level to address instruction gaps or prerequisite skills foundations

Explains the beliefs and designs behind the creation of unit adaptation packs for grades K–5.

Read about how the cool-down guidance can help when students struggle with the cool-down at the end of a lesson.

Why Is the Curriculum Design This Way?

In order to design curriculum and professional learning materials that support student and teacher learning, we need to be explicit about the principles that guide our understanding of mathematics teaching and learning.

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Design principles Read about each of the principles that informed the design of the materials

Further Reading Recommended resources for learning more about how the ideas in elementary school mathematics develop in later coursework

Key structures Learn more about the key structures used throughout the curriculum including journal prompts, PLCs, and math communities.

Mathematical representationsAll about the mathematical representations in the curriculum that support student concept development and problem solving.

How do you use the materials?

Each Lesson and Unit Tells a Story. The story of each grade is told in 8 or 9 units. Each unit has a narrative that describes the mathematical work that will unfold in that unit. Each lesson in the unit also has a narrative. Lesson narratives explain:

  • the mathematical content of the lesson and its place in the learning sequence
  • the meaning of any new terms introduced in the lesson
  • how the mathematical practices come into play, as appropriate
Activities within lessons also have narratives, which explain:
  • the mathematical purpose of the activity and its place in the learning
  • sequence what students are doing during the activity
  • what the teacher needs to look for while students are working on an activity to create an effective synthesis connections to the mathematical practices

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Collection of lesson videos from IM classrooms

All about the embedded instructional routines that support students in engaging with the mathematics of each lesso

Practice Problems Read more about how, when, and why to use practice problems

A Typical LessonUnderstand how a typical lesson unfolds

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Warm-up Routines

Lesson Activity Routines

  • Instructional Routines are designs for interaction that invite all students to engage in the mathematics of each lesson.
  • They provide opportunities for students to bring their personal experiences as well as their mathematical knowledge to problems and discussions.
  • They place value on students’ voices as they communicate their developing ideas, ask questions, justify their responses, and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Instructional routines have a predictable structure and flow.
  • They are enacted in classrooms to structure the relationship between the teacher and the students around content in ways that consistently maintain high expectations of student learning while adapting to the contingencies of particular instructional interactions (Kazemi, Franke, & Lampert, 2009).
  • A finite set of routines support the pacing of lessons as they become familiar and save time in classroom choreography, so students can spend less time learning how to execute lesson directions, and more time on learning mathematics.

Instructional Routines

There are 2 types of Instructional Routines

Mathematical Language Development

Principles for Promoting Mathematical Language

Family Guide to Instructional Routines

K-5 Family Support

Families can use guide to know what to expect and how to participate in the different warm-up routines found in each K-5 lesson.

Understand how the curriculum supports and advances mathematical language development in all students, including English Learners

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Imagine Learning Classroom Guides

How do You Assess Progress?

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How do the Materials Support ALL Learners?

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Scope and Sequence Information (K-5)

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Unfinished Learning

What Resources are Being Provided for K-5?

K-5 Unit Adaptation Packs

  • Designed to give teachers guidance about how to address loss of familiarity with topics from the previous course.
  • These are created for each unit of each course and, where appropriate, references Imagine Learning Illustrative Mathematics lessons from prior courses that may be useful to remind students of concepts that will help them engage with the current, grade-level unit.
  • Each adaptation pack also contains student-facing lessons recommended from below grade level to address instruction gaps or prerequisite skills foundations.
  • You can find the Adaptation Packs and Section Level Planning Guides, as well as additional resources for distance and unfinished learning

  • Family Supports
    • Family Guide to IM K-5 Routines
      • Every IM K-5 lesson starts with an invitation to the mathematics. This invitation is an engaging, brief activity called a warm-up routine. Each warm-up routine is designed to get students thinking and talking about math in ways that make sense to them.

  • K-5 Connecting Unfinished Learning and Section Planning Guides

Additional Resources

  • IM Resource HUB

  • IM Blog

It is our intent to create a problem-based curriculum that fosters the development of mathematics learning communities in classrooms, gives students access to the mathematics through a coherent progression, and provides teachers the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of mathematics, student thinking, and their own teaching practice.

The Lesson Activity Routines embed structures within the tasks of the lessons that allow students to engage in the content, and collaborate in ways that support the development of student thinking and precision with language.

Math Language Routines (MLRs) are Lesson Activity Routines that provide additional structures in order to support English learners. MLRs are written into each lesson, either as an embedded structure of a lesson activity in which all students engage, or as a suggested optional support specifically for English learners.

  • Use this practice set to guide students through navigating and completing digital items.
  • Assign the activity so students can follow along on a device.
  • The total suggested pacing for this lesson is between 20 and 25 minutes.
  • When planning to teach this lesson, consider the amount of time it would take students to get their devices, log-on, and find the assignment.

  • Use this practice set to guide students through navigating and completing digital items.
  • Assign the activity so students can follow along on a device.
  • The total suggested pacing for this lesson is between 20 and 25 minutes.
  • When planning to teach this lesson, consider the amount of time it would take students to get their devices, log-on, and find the assignment.

New For 23-24 School Year

More! Video resources to Support Teachers

Two more video segments to each K-5 unit:

  • Learning Progressions: Learning Progressions video details how the content of a unit builds upon prior knowledge, and how the understanding of the content provides students with readiness for future learning. The Learning Progressions video is ideal for teachers to study before teaching a unit, for a coach who will be supporting teachers with a specific unit, or for an instructional assistant or parent volunteer to quickly and efficiently understand what is needed to support students with the unit content.
  • Learning Supports: Learning Supports video gives an in-depth look into the models and representations used in this unit to help support student understanding. The Learning Supports video is ideal for teachers to study prior to teaching a unit, for a coach who will be supporting teachers with a specific unit, or for an instructional assistant or parent volunteer to quickly and efficiently understand what is needed to support students with the unit content. All of these great resources can be found on the Unit Videos page near the bottom of each unit page. Here are a couple of samples!

More! Digital Centers

  • Centers give students time to practice concepts and build math fluency in partners or small groups throughout the year.
  • To ease teacher prep and management, as well as provide Center opportunities outside of the classroom, Imagine Learning is developing digital versions of most center activities!
  • These Digital Centers can be assigned to students from the Imagine Learning Classroom (ILC) platform, supporting turn-based play on a single device or play against a computer.

More! Sample Lesson Videos

  • Working with partner districts, we're capturing the magic of Imagine Learning IM instruction live in action, in real classrooms!
  • These sample videos will feature at least one full lesson from warm-up to cool-down. We're adding more videos from a year two implementation.

Each lesson begins with a Warm-up Routine intentionally designed to elicit student discussions around the mathematical goal of the lesson. ​​

List of Warm-up Routines

The Imagine Learing Platform organizes the IM Curriculum in a very purposeful way.

Like a sandwich, the platform is designed top down with the "meaty" goodness in the middle

Overview Resources

Curriculum Content

Supporting Resources

Grade Band

Grade Level

Unit

Section

Lesson

Each tier or landing page is organized like a sandwich as well

Top Layer

"Meaty" Middle

Bottom

Curriculum Guide,gives information about... ❏ the suggested pacing guide for your grade level ❏ what a “problem-based” curriculum is and what’s in the curriculum ❏ how to use the materials, including what’s in a typical lesson, formative and summative assessment, and centers ❏ how the materials support all learners ❏ why the curriculum is designed the way it is ❏ scope and sequence information, such as unit dependencies

About

  • This sample lesson library is made possible by district partners and teachers who have invited us into classrooms to share their teaching practices and implementation journey.
  • The videos are unscripted and lightly edited for time.
  • Grade levels and progression of practice vary to provide authentic examples for review and reflection. In using these materials, please respect the contributions of these educators.
  • If you are interested in providing feedback or participating in this effort please use the "provide feedback" button on the page to connect with the Imagine Learning Curriculum Team.
Suggested Uses:
  • Review example lessons as part of a PLC workshop to help grow facilitation, questioning, or pacing strategies
  • Reflect on example lessons with coaches, focusing on specific aspects of the lesson structure
  • Use with administrators as examples of what they might see in the classroom in order to supporting beginning implementations

Introduce the Illustrative Mathematics Implementation Reflection Tool as a practice development resource

Example Lessons

Mathematical Language Development

Embedded within the curriculum are instructional routines and supports to help teachers address the specialized academic language demands when planning and delivering lessons, including the demands of reading, writing, speaking, listening, conversing, and representing in math (Aguirre & Bunch, 2012). While these instructional routines and supports can and should be used to support all students learning mathematics, they are particularly well-suited to meet the needs of linguistically and culturally diverse students who are learning mathematics while simultaneously acquiring English.

Design Principles For Promoting Mathematical Language Use And DevelopmentThese four Principles motivate the use of Mathematical Language Routines

  • Principle 1: Support Sense-Making
  • Principle 2: Optimize Output
  • Principle 3: Cultivate Conversation
  • Principle 4: Maximize Meta-Awareness