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Transcript

Types of deliverable

Here are some examples of different deliverable types you may be interested in building a powerpoint for! Click the plus button for more information, and when ready click the green arrow in the bottom right to proceed.

roject deliverable

Structure of a Project Deliverable

Tips on building Project Deliverables:

  • Length : Variable, dependent on the engagement and the stakeholders requirements
  • Standard Makeup :
    • Title
    • POST/ Agenda
    • Executive Summary
    • Project Introduction Slide
    • Stakeholders/ Teams Talked To
    • Main Body
    • Slide Dividers (Overall sections & sub-sections)
    • Discussion Slides
    • Appendix
  • Other notes: Create an executive summary of your deliverable as a separate presentation, making it at max 20 pages, to provide a focused version of the wider message for senior stakeholders that may not need as much of a view of the inner workings. Make sure to include any key diagrams or images in this part!

Know Your Audience: Start by understanding who you're talking to. What do they want to hear? Tailor your presentation to their needs and what they can relate to. Keep It Simple: Less is more. Don't overload your slides with information. Use simple language, bullet points, and visuals to get your message across clearly. Make It Look Good: Design matters, but it doesn't have to be complicated. Use a clean and consistent style, choose readable fonts and colors, and add images or charts that support your points. Tell a Story: Organize your presentation like a story. Begin with an introduction, share the main points, and finish with a conclusion or a clear call to action. Make it flow naturally. Practice Makes Perfect: Before you present, practice your talk multiple times. It helps you get comfortable with your material and ensures you can deliver it confidently and engagingly.

ecap

Structure of a Recap

Tips on building Recaps:

  • Length : Short, usually a few slides long depending on amount to cover
  • Standard Makeup :
    • Title
    • POST/ Agenda
    • Main Body
  • Other notes: The structure of a recap may be based around sprints, in which case it may cover PODs on separate slides, and the overall progress up to date. On other projects this may be different, and wil depend on the kind of delivery you are doing. Whichever thing you are recapping, focus on the visualisation of as much as possible to really provide quick insights to your stakeholders.

Summarize the Journey: Start by summarizing the journey you and your client have taken together. Highlight the key milestones and achievements.Use Simple Language: Keep your language straightforward. Avoid jargon and complex terms that might confuse your audience. Remember, you want everyone to understand the recap. Visualize the Progress: Make use of visuals like charts, graphs, and before-and-after images to show the progress and impact of the project. A picture can speak a thousand words. Share Insights and Learnings: Discuss the valuable insights and lessons learned during the project. Explain how these insights can benefit the client in the future. Celebrate Successes: Don't forget to celebrate successes and acknowledge the client's contributions. It's a way to show appreciation and foster a positive relationship.

Structure of a Status Update

Tips on building Status Updates:

  • Length : Short, usually a slide or two
  • Standard Makeup :
    • Main body
  • Other notes: A status update is one of the shortest presentations to do, and will most likely be at the end of a sprint. Not unlike a recap, these will be short, punchy documents showing the status of a project and any blockers there may be. Check out the training on writing a RAG matrix, which will come in handy here.
  • Initial slide should show an overview with visial aids. Then any follow up slides may contain a more in depth look at the data itself as needed

Highlight Key Updates: Start by highlighting the most important updates since your last communication. Focus on what has changed or progressed since your last discussion.Use Plain Language: Keep your language simple and avoid jargon. Make sure everyone, even those not deeply involved in the project, can grasp the updates easily. Visual Aids: Use visuals like charts, graphs, or images to illustrate your points. Visuals can make data and progress more digestible and engaging. Key Metrics: If applicable, share key performance metrics or KPIs to demonstrate the project's success or areas that need attention. Identify Challenges: Be transparent about any challenges or roadblocks you're facing. It's essential to address issues openly and discuss potential solutions.

tatus update

Structure of a Training Course

Tips on building Training:

  • Length : Subject dependent
  • Standard Makeup :
    • Title
    • POST/ Agenda
    • Engagement slide
    • Main Body
    • Quiz / Recap slides
    • Discussion Slides
    • Further learning links
  • Other notes: Training courses can be delivered in a variety of ways, but the main focus shoul dbe on engagement and retention. Build in recaps and quizes to break up long sections of talking to keep your audience focused.

Know Your Audience: Begin by understanding who you're training. What are their needs, skill levels, and goals? Tailor your course content to meet their specific requirements.Clear Learning Objectives: Define clear learning objectives for your course. What should participants be able to do or understand after completing the training? Keep these objectives in mind when designing the content. Engaging Content: Use a variety of teaching methods to keep participants engaged. Incorporate practical exercises, discussions, and real-life examples to make the content relatable and interesting. Structured Curriculum: Organize your course content logically. Start with an introduction, present the main concepts in a coherent order, and conclude with a summary or recap of key takeaways. Interactive Assessments: Include assessments or quizzes to gauge participants' understanding. This not only reinforces learning but also helps you identify areas that may need more focus.

raining

Structure of a Workshop

Tips on building Workshops:

  • Length : Subject dependent, leave plenty of room for discussion
  • Standard Makeup :
    • Title
    • POST/ Objectives
    • Project Introduction Slide
    • Stakeholders/ Teams Talked To
    • Main Body
    • Discussion Slides
  • Other notes: Workshops are about facilitating discussion and coming to agreements over points, so its important that not only do you leave plenty of room and oppotunity for discussion, but also make sure to try to keep everyone on task!

Clear Objectives: Begin by defining clear workshop objectives. What do you want participants to learn or achieve? Having a clear goal will guide your workshop design.Structured Agenda: Create a well-organized agenda that outlines the flow of the workshop. Start with an introduction, cover key topics, and end with a summary or actionable takeaways.Facilitation Skills: As the facilitator, focus on guiding the discussion, managing time effectively, and ensuring everyone has a chance to contribute. Encourage open dialogue and active listening. Adaptability: Be flexible and open to adjustments. Participants may have questions or unexpected insights that can enrich the workshop. Adapt to their needs while staying on track. Practical Takeaways: Ensure that participants leave with actionable takeaways or skills they can apply immediately. The workshop should provide value that extends beyond the session.

orkshop

RECAP

Using a PowerPoint presentation for a client recap is an effective way to offer a concise summary of our joint efforts. It simplifies complex information visually, enabling clients to review important milestones and insights from our collaboration. This recap serves as a practical tool to underscore the value we've delivered and solidify our ongoing professional relationship.

Training

Using a PowerPoint presentation for a training course is like having an interactive guidebook to explore a new world of knowledge. It's a way to break down complex concepts into bite-sized, visually appealing pieces, ensuring that everyone can follow along on this learning adventure. It's about making learning engaging, like a colorful map that helps participants navigate through the material and unlock new skills and insights together

Status update

Using a PowerPoint presentation for a status update is like creating a map of your project's journey. It helps you show the progress you've made, the obstacles you've faced, and the exciting milestones ahead in a clear and engaging way. Just as pictures make a story more interesting, visuals and bullet points make your project's status easy to understand, so everyone involved can stay on the same page and be part of the story.

Project deliverable

Using a PowerPoint presentation to present a project deliverable to clients is like crafting an engaging storybook that captures our collaborative journey and the outcomes achieved. It transforms intricate data into an accessible, visually compelling narrative, allowing clients to connect with the project's achievements, grasp its significance, and feel deeply involved in our shared success narrative.

Workshop

Using a PowerPoint presentation in a workshop is like having a helpful assistant who keeps everyone focused and on the same page. It provides a visual roadmap that guides our journey through the workshop's content, making sure we cover all the important points and sparking conversations - a key outcome of any workshop!

Other

There are many other kinds of presentation you may do, this is not an exhaustive list! Got one you use a lot? Add it to the forum for discussion!