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Transcript

Presented by AditI Kakran and Dhanashree Potnis

Design Thinking and
Fundamentals of innovation Manangement

What is Design Thinking?

Design thinking is an approach used for practical and creative problem-solving. It is based heavily on the methods and processes that designers use (hence the name), but it has actually evolved from a range of different fields—including architecture, engineering and business. Design thinking can also be applied to any field; it doesn’t necessarily have to be design-specific.


Design thinking is extremely user-centric. It focuses on humans first and foremost, seeking to understand people’s needs and come up with effective solutions to meet those needs. It is what we call a solution-based approach to problem-solving.


The human rule

What is Design Thinking Process?

The ambiguity rule

The redesign rule

The tangibility rule

All design activity is social in nature



Ambiguity is inevitable

experiment at the limits of your knowledge!


Prototypes help to make ideas tangible, enabling designers to

communicate them effectively.


While technology and social circumstances may change, basic human needs remain unchanged.



Four principles of design thinking

The human rule

What is Design Thinking Process?

The ambiguity rule

The redesign rule

The tangibility rule

All design activity is social in nature



Ambiguity is inevitable

experiment at the limits of your knowledge!


Prototypes help to make ideas tangible, enabling designers to

communicate them effectively.


While technology and social circumstances may change, basic human needs remain unchanged.



Four principles of design thinking

Prototype

Test

Empathise

The Five Phases of Design Thinking

Ideate

Define

What’s a “wicked problem” in Design Thinking?

Design Thinking is especially useful when it comes to solving “wicked problems”. The term “wicked problem” was coined by design theorist Horst Rittel in the 1970s to describe particularly tricky problems that are highly ambiguous in nature.


With wicked problems, there are many unknown factors; unlike “tame” problems, there is no definitive solution. In fact, solving one aspect of a wicked problem is likely to reveal or give rise to further challenges. Another key characteristic of wicked problems is that they have no stopping point; as the nature of the problem changes over time, so must the solution.

Solving wicked problems is therefore an ongoing process that requires Design Thinking! Some examples of wicked problems in our society today include things like poverty, hunger, and climate change.

What are the benefits of Design Thinking at work?


2022

  • Significantly reduces time-to-market

  • Cost savings and a great ROI

  • Improves customer retention and loyalty


  • Fosters innovation

  • Can be applied company-wide

1. Realization of value

Value, financial or non-financial, is realized from the deployment, adoption and impact of new or changed solutions for interested parties.

2. Future-focused leaders
Leaders at all levels, driven by curiosity and courage, challenge the status quo by building an inspiring vision and purpose and by continuously engaging people to achieve those aims.

3. Strategic direction
The direction for innovation activities is based on aligned and shared objectives and a relevant ambition level, supported by the necessary people and other resources.

4. Culture
Shared values, beliefs and behaviours, supporting openness to change, risk taking and collaboration enable the coexistence of creativity and effective execution.

5. Exploiting insights
A diverse range of internal and external sources are used to systematically build insightful knowledge, to exploit stated and unstated needs.

6. Managing uncertainty
Uncertainties and risks are evaluated, leveraged and then managed, by learning from systematic experimentation and iterative processes, within a portfolio of opportunities.

7. Adaptability
Changes in the context of the organization are addressed by timely adaptation of structures, processes, competences and value realization models to maximize innovation capabilities.

8. Systems approach
Innovation management is based on a systems approach with interrelated and interacting elements and regular performance evaluation and improvements of the system.

Fundamentals of Innovation Management

A short Example

https://youtu.be/uRtAzzitBmA

AN EXAMPLE

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