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What happen with the waste after you throw it

ECO-SMART

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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

  • Become aware of how improperly handled waste impacts the environment.
  • Explain some of the major problems caused by waste disposal and use of landfills.
  • Understand and explain the role of engineers in solid waste management.
  • Suggest ways to reduce the amount of solid waste going to a landfill.

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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

  • To understand the consequences to the environment
  • Sustainable waste


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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

  • Risk Assessment
  • Instructions for the group of Students


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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

  • Try a different experiment: Methane from the landfill.

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

  • Science Laboratory
  • Material:
  • 2-liter plastic beverage bottle
  • 1 tennis ball-sized mound of modeling clay; enough to line the inside of the top half of the 2-liter bottle
  • 3 cups of soil
  • ¾ cup water
  • ½ sheet of paper, torn into small pieces; tip: use recycled paper from Activity 1 or newspaper
  • 2 lettuce leaves, torn into small pieces
  • 1 apple, sliced/diced into small pieces
  • 2-3 plastic food containers, cut into small pieces about
  • ½ inch square; tip: use empty butter or yogurt containers
  • 8 pairs of rubber or latex gloves, 2 pair per student
  • 2 spoons or popsicle sticks
  • set of measuring cups, specifically, 1 cup, ½ cup and ¼ cup sizes
  • 4 inches of masking tape, for labeling landfills

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

https://www.teachengineering.org/curriculum/browse?q=lanfill

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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

04

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

Step 1

60 min

Instructions step by step

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WHAT HAPPEN WITH THE

WASTE AFTER YOU THROW IT

Before Lesson:
Remind the students the different ways of waste disposal. Student groups will work as engineers to build and observe model landfills they make using two-liter plastic bottles. They come to understand the process and pitfalls of landfills as a waste disposal method.


  • Ask students to bring in 2-liter plastic beverage bottles from home to use for the activity. Tell students to wash each bottle and leave it to air dry, saving the caps. Cut each group's 2-liter bottle in half horizontally (keep the top section slightly larger). Twist the caps on securely (even over tighten them if possible).
  • Pick a location to keep the model landfills during the observation period. Choose a place that receives sunlight, but where the odor will not be bothersome.
  • Mix the food (lettuce and apples), the paper, and the plastic together into a "garbage" sample.

Decaying landfill garbage can produce harmful methane gas, which is a source of fires and environmental hazards. So, engineers design gas pipe systems to collect landfill gases, including methane, carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide, which are used to generate electricity.

Activity:


Worksheet:

https://www.teachengineering.org/content/cub_/activities/cub_environ/cub_environ_lesson04_activity2_worksheet_v1_sas.pdf

1. Divide the class into groups of four, students each and distribute the supplies (activity sheets, soil, approximately ½ cup of the "garbage" sample, water, 2-liter bottles, clay, gloves, and masking tape).

2. Ask each group to write the name of their group members on the masking tape and place it on the top portion (the neck end of the bottle) of the 2-liter bottle.

3. Ask all students to put on their latex/rubber gloves.

4. Ask the groups to line the inside of the top portion of the 2-liter bottle with clay, as in Figure 1. (Discuss how this is similar to the clay and plastic liners used in modern sanitary landfills to prevent toxins from leaching into the ground water.)

Figure 1. Clay-lined model landfill

5. Have students place the top portion of the 2-liter bottle upside down in the cut off bottom half of the bottle. (The

bottom serves as a stand that will help keep the model upright.)

6. Ask students to place about 2 cups of their soil inside the clay-lined "landfill."

Have the groups spread their "garbage" sample on top of the soil (see Figure 2).


Figure 2. A Model landfill with garbage

7. Ask students to sprinkle their remaining soil on top of the "garbage."

8. Have students sprinkle ¾ cup water over their landfill. (Note: Discuss that the water simulates rainfall)

9. On the accompanying activity worksheet, have students draw a diagram of their landfill and label it appropriately in Section I, Drawing.

10. For the Prediction section of the worksheet, ask students to write down their predictions about what will happen with their landfill over the next 4 days.

11. Place all the landfills in a location where they will get some sunlight yet where the odor will not be bothersome to the class (or others).

12. On day two, observe the landfills as a class. Have students record their observations. Discuss what leaching is (i.e., in this case, a process whereby toxins leak into the soil/water as a result of rains or other moisture) and look for evidence of it in the landfills.

13. Repeat the observation process on days 3 and 4. On day 3, have students sprinkle another ¾ cup water over their landfills.

14. On day five, have students do the final steps and observations.

15. After students have put on a pair of rubber/latex gloves, ask them to carefully remove the cap from the bottle and let the water drain into the bottom one-half of the 2-liter bottle. Ask them to record their observations.

16. Ask the students to use the spoon/popsicle stick to gently scrape back the top layer of dirt. What do they notice about the garbage in their landfills? Ask them to record their observations.

17. Use the "Numbered Heads" Assessment activity to discuss the results with student teams.

18. Ask the students to work together as a team to complete the questions in the Response section of their activity worksheets. Use the Numbered Heads procedure to discuss answers.