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Transcript

Carbon bath

ECO-SMART

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Intersecting objectives

Purpose/ Learning objective

Facilitation

Ideas for follow-up

Resources required

Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

Annexes

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

  • Acids and Bases: Ocean Acidification
  • This lesson allows students to explore the concepts of acids and bases using the context of ocean acidification. Students will first complete an experiment that illustrates that the absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide by the ocean causes the ocean to become more acidic. Then, the class will explore the effects that a change in pH might have on ocean life. This lesson should follow an introduction to acids and bases and is meant to provide a real-world application to these concepts and an opportunity to work with pH indicators.


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Intersecting objectives

Purpose/ Learning objective

Ideas for follow-up

Resources required

Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

Carbon bath

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Facilitation

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

  • Learners will be able to define the concept of carbon footprint.

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Intersecting objectives

Purpose/ Learning objective

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Resources required

Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

Carbon bath

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Facilitation

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Intersecting objectives

Purpose/ Learning objective

Ideas for follow-up

Resources required

Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

Carbon bath

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Facilitation

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

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Intersecting objectives

Purpose/ Learning objective

Ideas for follow-up

Resources required

Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

Carbon bath

Topic: coral bleaching.

Talk with your students about corals. Did they know they are actually considered animals? Ask them to describe a coral. The answer will probably contain some colour. Now show them a photo of a bleached reef. What caused that? Link it to acidification. What can we do to prevent this? Students can create a 2-piece collage.
In the 1st piece, there will be pictures of healthy coral reefs and everything they do for the oceans. In the 2nd piece, there will be pictures of a bleached reef and the consequences on marine life.
Link with extra info:

https://www.greenpeace.org/eastasia/blog/6119/what-is-coral- what-are-the-causes-impacts-and-solutions-of-coral-bleaching/

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Facilitation

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

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Intersecting objectives

Purpose/ Learning objective

Ideas for follow-up

Resources required

Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

Carbon bath

Materials

  • Bromothymol blue pH indicator solution (available for purchase from any science supply company)
  • 1 small cup of water for each student
  • 1 straw for each student
  • Pipettes
  • Paper towels
  • Shells or coral
  • Vinegar
  • Chalk of different colors, broken in half
  • 2–3 Small plastic cups per student
  • pH paper (available for purchase from any science supply company, pool supply store, or most pet stores)

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Facilitation

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

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Purpose/ Learning objective

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Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

Carbon bath

Andrake B., Coral Reefs in Danger: Ocean Acidification Lesson, Jonathan Bird’s Blue World. Available at

http://www.blueworldtv.com/images/uploads/lesson-plans/Lesson_plan_webisode41Acidification.pdf

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Facilitation

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1 Day before class

ECOSMART CONCEPTUAL MAP

Step 1

Step 2

20 min

Step 3

10 min

Instructions step by step

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Intersecting objectives

Purpose/ Learning objective

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Source/The day of the lesson: Materials & Class prep.

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Implementation

Carbon bath

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Facilitation

Preparation

Place a small seashell into a container with vinegar a day before the class and let it sit overnight.

Directly before the lesson, place 4–5 drops of the indicator solution in a small cup of water. The water should be noticeably blue/green in colour. Prepare one cup of water and indicator solution for each student.

Explain the following key terms to the students.


pH Indicator: A chemical compound that visually shows the Ph of a solution.

Carbon Sink: Something that can absorb carbon.

Sometimes it is natural like trees or algae, and other times it is manmade, like systems that allow humans to pump extra carbon into rocks in the bottom of the ocean.

Ocean Acidification: The decrease of the ocean’s pH due to increased absorption of carbon dioxide.

Dissociation: The separation of a compound into simpler parts.

Direct students to put on goggles.


Ask students to take note of the colour of the liquid in their cup.


Tell them that they will use the straws to blow into the blue liquid for 30 seconds. Some of the water might overflow onto the table, but they should try to be neat.


Instruct students to blow into the straw. Time them for 30 seconds. After 30 seconds, direct students to put their straws down. Students can now remove their goggles.


Again, ask students to notice the colour of the liquid in their cup. They will notice that the liquid has turned yellow.


Ask students to hypothesize why the liquid changed colour and what liquid they think was in the cup

to begin with. Allow a few students to share their ideas.


You can prompt them by asking what they were exhaling into the cup. After a short discussion, explain that the cup contained water with a few drops of a pH indicator solution. If necessary, review the concept of pH and pH indicators. Now that they have this information, do they have a different idea of why their liquid turned colour?


Explain that students exhaled carbon dioxide into the cup, which made the water slightly more acidic causing the indicator solution to change color. If you wish, you can discuss the following equation with students:

CO2 + H2O ! H2CO3

(carbonic acid)

The carbon dioxide and water combine to create carbonic acid.

Carbon dioxide plays a part in natural processes such as breathing, and carbon dioxide is an important part of our atmosphere. However, humans are adding carbon dioxide to our atmosphere at a faster rate than ever before through our use of fossil fuels.

The ocean acts as a carbon sink. This means that the ocean absorbs carbon from the atmosphere.


Tell students that as more carbon dioxide has been produced, the ocean has absorbed more carbon dioxide than it has in the past, and the ocean pH has begun to change, becoming more acidic. This

is similar to when the students exhaled carbon dioxide into the water and the pH indicator solution showed that the liquid became slightly more acidic.



Although the change in numbers may seem small, they actually represent a significant change in ocean pH over time. This is a good opportunity to remind students that a change in one whole number on the pH scale (i.e. going from a pH of 8 to a pH of 7) represents a tenfold increase in hydronium ion concentration.



Ask students how a change in pH might affect ocean life. Prompt them to think about things they might have seen on TV or in magazines.