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Celebrating Black History Month and Women's History Month

Transcript

REMARKABLE BLACK WOMEN - 2022

Anaïs ABDALLAH - 2022

BLACK HISTORY MONTH
(FEBRUARY) AND WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH (March)


Every February since 1976, the United States has celebrated the achievements of African Americans during Black History Month. The month-long celebration puts those accomplishments into focus via the media and in classrooms.
Black History Month is a time when people can come together in memory of our rich past... It is a time when we get the opportunity to learn about many contributions and accomplishments.
March is Women's History Month – commemorating and encouraging the study and celebration of the vital role of women.
It is an opportunity to honor women's contributions in American history.
To celebrate those important months: find out about American history and learn about some of the most amazing African American women in the USA.

REMARKABLE BLACK WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES

STEP 4 :
THINK FOR YOURSELF:

CHOOSE AND PRESENT YOUR OWN S-HERO AND EXPLAIN WHY SHE IS/WAS IMPORTANT FOR HISTORY.

STEP 1 :
ABOUT AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE UNITED STATES

STEP 3 :

S-HEROES ("She rose") : WOMEN AS HEROES

STEP 2 :
IMPORTANT LIFE EVENTS

STEP 1:


About African
Americans in the United States.

1/ SLAVERY

2/ RACIAL SEGREGATION

3/ FIGHTING FOR EQUALITY

1963

Creation of the

Ku Klux Klan,
a white supremacist
terrorist
hate group.

1960

Civil War between the Union and the Confederates.

2009

Barack Obama,

First African American President.

1863

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation freed all slaves in states in rebellion against the United States

1954

George Washington,

First President of the USA

2013

First “Jim Crow laws” in the South to limit Black people’s rights.

2021

Kamala Harris became first female and African/Asian American Vice-President

Let's have a quick look at history

1865

Twenty Africans arrived and were enslaved in Virginia.

1861-1865

The 13th amendment abolished slavery in the United States

1866

1789

1880s

The United States Supreme Court declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional.

First African American girl in an all-white elementary school.

Mach on Washington: “I have a dream” speech, by Martin Luther King Junior.

1955

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Civil Rights Act of 1964 abolished racial segregation and discrimination

1964

1966

The Black Panther Party was created against discriminations and police brutality.

1968

Martin Luther King Jr.

was assassinated.

1619

The “Black Lives Matter” movement was created.

2020

George Floyd was murdered and it inspired the largest Black Lives Matter protests in history accross the globe.

1909

NAACP was created to gain equality with legal actions.

1963

Creation of the

Ku Klux Klan,
a white supremacist
terrorist
hate group.

1960

Civil War between the Union and the Confederates.

2009

Barack Obama,

First African American President.

1863

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation freed all slaves in states in rebellion against the United States

1954

George Washington,

First President of the USA

2013

First “Jim Crow laws” in the South to limit Black people’s rights.

2021

Kamala Harris became first female and African/Asian American Vice-President

Let's have a quick look at history

1865

Twenty Africans arrived and were enslaved in Virginia.

1861-1865

The 13th amendment abolished slavery in the United States

1866

1789

1880s

The United States Supreme Court declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional.

First African American girl in an all-white elementary school.

Mach on Washington: “I have a dream” speech, by Martin Luther King Junior.

1955

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Civil Rights Act of 1964 abolished racial segregation and discrimination

1964

1966

The Black Panther Party was created against discriminations and police brutality.

1968

Martin Luther King Jr.

was assassinated.

1619

The “Black Lives Matter” movement was created.

2020

George Floyd was murdered and it inspired the largest Black Lives Matter protests in history accross the globe.

1909

NAACP was created to gain equality with legal actions.

In 1619, Africans were brought as slaves to the United States by ship.
They were forced into slavery and were exploited to work as servants in the production of crops (tobacco and cotton). They really contributed to the foundation of American economy.

People who didn't agree with that situation were called "abolitionists" and they wanted to end slavery. The issue eventually divided the nation: the abolitionist movement (the effort to end slavery) started mid-19th century and led to the American Civil War between the Union (the North) and the Confederate States (the South) from 1861 to 1865.

During the Civil War, former President Abraham Lincoln declared the end of slavery in the rebellious states with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. On January 31st, 1865, the 13th Amendment abolished slavery everywhere in the USA.
The Civil War ended in April, 1865 and was won by the Union. Five days after the end of the war, Abraham Lincoln was shot.

Juneteenth (short for “June Nineteenth (19th)”) marks the day when federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, in 1865 to take control of the state and declared that enslaved people were freed, two and a half years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation.
In 1979, Texas became the first state to make Juneteenth an official holiday.


The word "segregation" means separating people because of their races, religions, etc.

After the abolition of slavery, African Americans were still treated unfairly: racial discrimination escalated. A series of laws were passed to restrict the ex-slaves' freedom.

People in the South were not really prepared for the end of slavery and they did not want to live with Black people, so they chose to live "separate but equal" but actually, they were not that equal: Black Americans were marginalized through diminished access to facilities, housing, education etc.

"SEPARATE BUT EQUAL"

Black Codes

In the South, there were laws only applying to Black people, dictating their lives, including where they could work and live: the "Black Codes". It restricted their right to own proprety, to conduct business and to vote.

For example, in South Carolina, Black people could not have an occupation other than farmer or servant, unless they paid an annual tax of $10 to $100 (which was much at the time).

Former slave owners wanted to limit Black people's rights to maintain White supremacy and that's how the Ku Klux Klan (a racist and terrorist hate group) was created in Tennessee, in December 1865. The KKK promoted 'White supremacy' by intimidating, attacking and lynching black people.

In the 1880s, Jim Crow laws were passed to separate Black and White people in public and private space: they required separate schools, restaurants and transportation based on the color of a person's skin in order to limit contacts between them. Black people were not allowed to go where they wanted.

"Jim Crow" was a racist term for a Black person. The name Jim Crow came from a song and dance caricature where Thomas Rice painted his face black and mocked Black people.

JIM CROW LAWS

Jim Crow era

Things were separate, but not equal.

Wyoming: All marriages of white persons with Negroes, Mulattos, Mongolians, or Malaya hereafter contracted in the State of Wyoming are and shall be illegal and void.

Texas: The County Board of Education “shall provide schools of two kinds; those for white children and those for colored children."

Georgia: All persons licensed to conduct the business of selling beer or wine...shall serve either white people exclusively or colored people exclusively and shall not sell to two races within the same room at any time.

Kentucky: Railroad stations must provide separate but equal waiting rooms for the white and colored passengers. A sign posting what race is in what room is to be seeable by everyone.

Arkansas: Streetcar companies are to separate white and black passengers.

Delaware: Separate tuberculosis hospitals are to be established for blacks.

Virginia: The white race and the colored race shall be separated in public halls, theaters, opera houses, motion picture shows or any place of public entertainment or public assemblage which is attended by both white and colored persons.

North Carolina: Books shall not be interchangeable between the white and colored schools, but shall continue to be used by the race first using them.

Examples of Jim Crow laws

The Civil Rights Movement is the name for the struggle for equality with non-violent protests and civil disobedience (peacefully refusing to follow unfair laws).

People (African Americans but also White people) united against the injustice.

There were many significant events during the 1950s and 1960s that led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed racial discrimination.

Activists used strategies like boycotts, sit-ins, legal actions and protest marches.

FIGHTING FOR EQUALITY

Civil Rights Movements

Here are some important events:
  • The NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) was formed in 1909, by both Black and White activists, with the aim of fighting against discrimination by challenging it in the courts.
  • That's how, in 1954, the Supreme Court declared segregation in schools unconstitutional.
  • In 1955, Rosa Parks refused to stand up for a White man and the Montgomery Bus Boycott started, which led to the end of bus segregation in 1956.
  • The sit-in campaigns of 1960 : in a sit-in, protesters occupied a segregated place, sat quietly and refused to leave in order to provoke arrest and gain attention for the cause.
  • The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, on August 28, 1963, with Martin Luther King Jr. 's "I have a dream" speech
  • Civil Rights Act 1964: discrimination is outlawed.

Nowadays, the struggle for equality continues: Black Lives Matter (BLM) is an international movement, formed in the United States in 2013.


It is dedicated to fighting racism and anti-Black violence, especially because of multiple unjust killings of Black people by police (Black people are more likely to be killed by police in the United States than white people).

The name "Black lives matter" demands that society values the lives and humanity of Black people as much as it values the lives and humanity of White people.

1963

Creation of the

Ku Klux Klan,
a white supremacist
terrorist
hate group.

1960

Civil War between the Union and the Confederates.

2009

Barack Obama,

First African American President.

1863

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation freed all slaves in states in rebellion against the United States

1954

George Washington,

First President of the USA

2013

First “Jim Crow laws” in the South to limit Black people’s rights.

2021

Kamala Harris became first female and African/Asian American Vice-President

Let's have a quick look at history

1865

Twenty Africans arrived and were enslaved in Virginia.

1861-1865

The 13th amendment abolished slavery in the United States

1866

1789

1880s

The United States Supreme Court declared segregation in public schools unconstitutional.

First African American girl in an all-white elementary school.

Mach on Washington: “I have a dream” speech, by Martin Luther King Junior.

1955

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Civil Rights Act of 1964 abolished racial segregation and discrimination

1964

1966

The Black Panther Party was created against discriminations and police brutality.

1968

Martin Luther King Jr.

was assassinated.

1619

The “Black Lives Matter” movement was created.

2020

George Floyd was murdered and it inspired the largest Black Lives Matter protests in history accross the globe.

1909

NAACP was created to gain equality with legal actions.

Her name is Gabi Wilson, aka H.E.R., short for "Having Everything Revealed".

In 2021, she was awarded the Grammy Award for Song of the Year for "I Can't Breathe", and the Academy Award for Best Original Song for "Fight for You" from the film Judas and the Black Messiah (2021).

Life events

She was born on (+full date) / in (+year)

She grew up in (+place)

She had (+number) kid(s).

She graduated from (+university) in (+year)...

She studied (+subject) in (+place)

She was raised by (+person). She had (+number) brothers and sisters.

She worked as a (+job)/ She became a (+job)

She fell in love with (+person)

She married (+person)

She got divorced in (+date)

She won an award/
a trophy/ a prize for...

She died on (+full date)/in (+year)

Write the vocabulary.

https://en.islcollective.com/english-esl-worksheets/grammar/linking-verbs-copulas/life-events/128877


BESSIE COLEMAN

ROSA PARKS

OPRAH WINFREY

SOJOURNER TRUTH

JOSEPHINE BAKER

MICHELLE OBAMA

RUBY BRIDGES

CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHIE

SERENA WILLIAMS

HARRIET TUBMAN

A CARTOON

HER STORY IN SHORT

HARRIET AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

READ

(Watch when you're finished)

HARRIET TUBMAN

Harriet Tubman was born in Maryland, around 1820 (her exact birth date is unknown). Her birth name was Araminta Ross, "Minty" and she had 8 brothers and sisters. She grew up as a slave, like the rest of her family. She was both a field hand and a domestic servant.

In 1844, she "married" John Tubman. She took his name and dubbed herself "Harriet". On September 17, 1849, she escaped to the North with two of her brothers (they were going to be sold). Her husband refused to join. However, with the help of the Underground Railroad, Harriet persevered and traveled 90 miles north to Pennsylvania and freedom.

Tubman found work as a housekeeper in Philadelphia but she wasn't satisfied: she wanted freedom for her family and friends too. She soon returned to the South to help people to escape. Her success led slaveowners to post a $40,000 reward for her capture or death. She became an Underground Railroad "conductor" and was known as the "Moses of her people".

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Harriet found new ways to fight slavery. She became a Union spy and she often transformed herself into an aging woman to get information. Pneumonia took Harriet Tubman’s life on March 10, 1913, but her legacy lives on. In 2016, she was chosen to replace former President and slaveowner Andrew Jackson on the twenty-dollar bill. In 2021, President Joe Biden said they would speed up the process.

03

02

04

01

2022

The Underground Railroad was a secret network of routes and safe houses used by black slaves in the United States to escape to free states and Canada with the help of abolitionists.

The Problem We All Live With Norman Rockwell - 1964

STEP 1:

Observe and describe the painting.

Okay, I'm finished.

HELP

Type of document:

The document is ...

  1. A drawing
  2. A cartoon
  3. A poster
  4. An article
  5. An advertisement
  6. A photograph
  7. A painting
  8. A cover

BUT HOW CAN I DESCRIBE

A VISUAL DOCUMENT?

1/IDENTIFY THE DOCUMENT

2/DESCRIBE WHAT YOU CAN SEE

I can see...

There is (+singulier)
There are (+pluriel)

WHO ?

WHAT?

WHERE?

Use BE + ING to describe actions!
Ex: They are dancing.

Use "look"/"seem" to describe emotions.
Ex: The boy looks angry.

When?

It was drawn / created / written / painted by .... (name) in ...... (date)

Who did it?

3/INTERPRETATION AND OPINION

Maybe it represents... / The message is...

I think... / I believe that ...

Where?!

STEP 2: THE STORY BEHIND THE PAINTING

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's speech, used by Beyoncé for the Flawless intro.