Want to make creations as awesome as this one?

Transcript

7

6

4

2

3

1

5

Egyptian amulets have been known since Predynastic times, but it was not until the New Kingdom (1550-1070 BC) and especially from the Late Period (664-332 BC) onwards when their use became widespread, encompassing the whole of Egypt.


Their different functions and meaning are shown in several papyri and on the ceiling of the third chapel dedicated to Osiris in the temple of Dandara, and, thus, correctly read, would give “life” to these small objects.

funeral beadnet


Late Period (664—332 BC)

Faience


Funeral beadnet to be placed over the bandages of the deceased. At the level of the chest there is a winged scarab, and in the center, four amulet-plates with mummiform aspect, representing the sons of Horus: human-headed Amset, baboon-headed Hapy, falcon-headed Quebehsenuf, and jackal-headed Duamutef.



EGYPTIAN FUNERARY AMULETS. PROTECTION AND MAGIC IN THE AFTERLIFE


In ancient Egypt, the funerary amulets were placed between the bandages or inserted in the beadnet dress that covered the mummified deceased, in order to protect, preserve and regenerate the body due to its magical properties.


Amulets took many different forms, mainly figures of divinities, sacred animals, scarabs, plants, and real attributes, parts of the body or abstract concepts shaped like hieroglyphs. They were made of different materials that had a symbolic value according to their color, such as faience (youth), lapis lazuli (regeneration), carnelian and red jasper (blood) and gold (immutability).

POLYCHROME CARTONAGGE


Ptolemaic-Roman period (332 BC-300 AD)


Polychrome cartonnage showing the goddess Maat with extended wings holding the feather of Justice. Underneath, Anubis is attending the deceased and is flanked by the goddesses Isis and Nephthys, as mourners. On both sides, the four sons of Horus are accompanied by Isis and Nephthys.



ARRANGEMENT OF AMULETS BETWEEN THE BANDAGES


Materials: Faience, stone, basalt and lapis lazuli

Late Period (664-332 BC)


There was never a single model in terms of the arrangement and number of amulets that had to accompany the deceased. The combinations were multiple, but all followed the rigorous religious-funeral logic, and reflected the social status of the latter.

7

20

12

10

21

5

22

4

14

26

16

6

17

3

8

9

1

23

24

11

2

13

25

19

18

15

11

1. Heart



2. Frog



3. Sow


4. Headrest


5. Ithyphallic figure



6. Toeris


7. Red Crown



8. White Crown


9. Shu


10. Wedjat eyes




11. Papyrus stem


12. Lotus flower


13. Shen


14. Bastet cat


15. Uraeus


16. Thoth


17. Anubis


18. Sekhmet


11. Papyrus stem


19. Two fingers


20. Heart


21. Double feather


22. Plaque with 4 goddesses


23. Bes


24. Scarab



25. Djed-pillar






1. Heart.

2. Frog.

3. Sow.

4. Headrest.

5. Ithyphallic figure.

6. Toeris.

7. Red Crown.

8. White Crown.

9. Shu.

10. Wedjat eyes.

11. Papyrus stem.

12. Lotus flower.

13. Shen.

14. Bastet cat.

15. Uraeus.

16. Thoth.

17. Anubis.

18. Sekhmet.

19. Two fingers.

20. Heart.

21. Double feather.

22. Plaque with 4 goddesses.

23. Bes.

24. Scarab.

25. Djed-pillar.