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Flexxing Your Teaching

Offer more flexibility in your courses, whether that form is hybrid, hyflex, blended, or some other funky term that describes your course.

Flexxing as Pedagogy

Goals

content and resources

Engagement/learning activities

assessment/evaluation

Flexxing is a way of thinking about how you want to teach

Instructional approach that combines face-to-face and online learning.

Goal of HyFlex course design is to give students access to equivalent learning experiences.

Students should have access to the course content in forms that are most useful and relevant to their learning.

Learning is effortful and achieved through action, and learners succeed when their time is well spent.

Assessments should enable students to demonstrate their understanding in multiple, authentic and meaningful ways.

ctli@jibc.ca

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Incorporating greater flexibility into your classes is a pedagogical consideration that affects all aspects of your course design, informing decisions around style, tone, format, technology, and teaching approaches.

Principle:

Flexibility supports meaningful choices that students can make to help direct their own learning. This has to be a guide to your instructional design.


Considerations:

  • Sharing responsibility enables students to help define what everyone can achieve collectively by participating in this course.
  • Flexibility has logistical concerns attached to it, but it is primarily a philosophical principle that supports your views about learning and the best way to support learners.


Actions:

  • Ask students to articulate goals for themselves in accordance with what is expected of them generally.
  • Encourage students to articulate goals that they can share with others in the course.
  • Ask students to describe appropriate ways to achieve learning outcomes as stated in your syllabus.

Principle:

  • Students should have access to the course content in forms that are most useful and relevant to their learning.


Considerations:

  • How do you want to most effectively provide content and information to your students?
  • How do learners contribute to the course content? (e.g. student presentations, opportunities for student facilitation of topics, creation of “learning objects” to become part of a growing content repository
  • Consider that something a student creates can be made available to others as a resource.


Actions:

  • Encourage students to be producers as well as consumers of content.
  • Provide alternative formats for your materials. For example, video and audio recordings should have captioning.
  • Make sure that other elements of your course (e.g. discussions, modules, etc.) are screen-reader friendly and meet UDL design standards.

Principle:

Learning is effortful and achieved through action, and learners succeed when their time is well spent.


Considerations:

  • What is the best use of your time when you meet with students?
  • What is the best use of students’ time when they meet you and each other?
  • Consider the importance of student presence, both in space (online/on-site) and in time (asynchronously/synchronously). How can you support presence in any of those aspects?
  • What communication and info technologies can support student presence. How can you support students in using these?


Actions:

  • Discuss with students to define how you want to be able to work with your students, in one-to-one and one-to-many contexts.
  • Facilitate a discussion on expectations for students in terms of working with each other
  • Give learners enough choice to be able to contribute meaningfully to class activities, including alternatives for synchronous activities.

Principle:

  • Assessments should enable students to demonstrate their understanding in multiple, authentic and meaningful ways.


Consideration:

  • What are the conditions necessary for your students to demonstrate their progress of learning?
  • Students can contribute to assessments by identifying requirements, developing standards of success and providing feedback to peers.
  • One student’s assessment can be another’s resource.


Actions:

  • Provide student choice of types and formats of assessment.
  • Include students in the design of assessments.
  • Incorporate opportunities for self and peer assessment as ways that students work together to achieve learning outcomes.