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MIS, DIS & MAl Information

This resource was created by Jennifer LaGarde and Darren Hudgins.

Can you spot the difference?

MISInformation?

DISInformation?

MALInformation?

1/5

Your cousin, who suffers with migraines, shares this meme on facebook as a semi-serious joke about how long they've been waiting for headache relief. Is this an example of...

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Bingo. Even though this meme falsley implies that the rate at which COVID vaccines were created makes them unsafe, because your cousin shared it as a comment on migraine treatment, and didn't intend to amplify false content, it's an example of MISinformation!

MISInformation?

DISInformation?

MALInformation?

2/5

Your cousin creates this meme as a way to amplify a conspiracy theory they read about online. They are aware that others dispute this claim, but continue to believe the conspiracies. Is this an example of...

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Bravo! Because this meme was created to intentionally spread false content, it's an example of DISinformation. Knowingly creating content to spread untruths (even if you believe them to be accurate) is DIS information.

MALInformation?

MISInformation?

3/5

Your cousin (you have a lot of cousins!) uses this photo out of context to spread false information about COVID vaccines. Is this an example of...

DISInformation?

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Right. The difference here is that the photo is accurate, but the context is changed to fuel distrust in COVID-19 vaccines. MALinformation always contains an element of truth/fact.

MISInformation

DISInformation

MALInformation

4/5

Your cousin creates this meme leaving out the fact that only 37% of those surveyed responded and less than 10% of those thought this drug had potential in treating COVID19. Is this an example of...

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Well done. Another example of MALinformation is when the content contains facts (in this case, a survey of 6,000 doctors was conducted), but significant details are omitted or changed in order to spread untruths, manipulate public opinion and/or cause harm. (In this case, your cousin left out some important facts about the study which might cause those who viewed the meme to trust potentially harmful medical advice).

MISInformation?

MALInformation?

DISInformation?

5/5

Your cousin creates this meme to fuel anti Asian hate related to COVID19. Is this an example of....

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Excellent! This is DISinformation because it contains a false claim that was created intentionally to cause harm and, in this case, spread hate.

IN ADDITION TO THE EXAMPLES WE'VE EXPLORED...

MISinformation

Next

DISinformation

MALinformation

images or videos that are fabricated to make it seem as though a person said or did something they did not.An example might be when technology is used to photoshop people into compromising positions or to create "deep fake" videos that embarass or humiliate their subjects.

personal, private information is added to false content in order to cause harm (putting the person whose information is shared at risk).An example might be adding someone's name, address or phone number to content that falsely implies they are responsible for a crime (or some other terrible act).

unintential, careless mistakes made when information is shared before all the facts are known.An example might be when incorrect information about injuries are reported during a natural disaster or in the midst of a developing news story. Retractions and updates usually follow.

Can also include...

IT'S COMPLICATED

More Info

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As you may have already noticed, context and intention are important when identifying MIS, DIS and MAL information. One meme, for example, can potentially represent all three types of false content depending on:who shared it and...their role in creating it and/ortheir intent to do harm.Still, even though these labels can shift depending on context, thinking about whether something is an example of MIS, DIS or MAL information can help us recognize content that's been designed to influence or manipulate us. The goal of this learning isn't the pursuit of a single, static right answer. Rather, a deeper understanding of these concepts should instead help us ask better questions about the information we consume.