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Eurospectives 2.0 StoryLines Map

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Eurospectives 2.0
StoryLines

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The European Commission'ssupport for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents, which reflect the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein

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Training Excercises

Additional materials

Training Overview

Stop 1

Recognise Context and Create Responsible Practice

Introduction:

Digital storytelling for well-being can be used with individuals and groups.


Before applying the practice, it is important for the facilitator to recognise the context they are working in. It is vital that a facilitator applying this practice has a good understanding of the participants that they are working with, and knowledge of the specific needs of the individuals and groups.


This session will investigate the reason why a thorough needs assessment is necessary and explore the difference between working with groups and working with individuals.


Digital storytelling uses multimedia tools to bring narratives to life. They are typically videos that combine audio, images, and video clips to tell a story. In this context of Stories for Well-being, digital storytelling is used so a person can tell a story of their lived experience to enhance their life. This might be by developing personal skills such as; self-confidence, compassion, social and emotional literacy. Or it could be used to create catharsis or help with cognitive development and memory.

Objectives:

To recognise the importance of creating a safe space. To examine the use of needs assessments.

To consider how requirements differ when working with individuals and groups.

Time:

1.15 – 3 hours depending on the size of the group.

Preparation

A thorough needs assessment should be conducted before delivering the sessions.

Collection of resources.

A session plan that include timings.

Making the space comfortable and accessible.

Facilitation Style

The facilitation style should be relaxed, informal and personal, but not casual. The participants must feel comfortable in the space and must trust the facilitator.

Target groups.

Learning Check/ Evaluation

The participants for this training are facilitators/practitioners who have a good level of literacy.

Any participants who have additional needs must have support to be able to take part.

ession 1

Preparing and Planning a Session

Aims:

To familiarise the participants with a need’s assessment process.

To familiarise the participants with ways to create a safe space for their groups/participants.

To familiarise the participants with the different requirements for individual work and group work.

Resources:

Example of a needs assessment form. Examples of individual work and group work

Computers or pens and paper. Flipchart paper and pens.

Duration:

2 hours for a group of 8-12 30 mins for individuals.

Procedure

Undertaking Needs Assessment

It is very useful and best practice for a facilitator to have some understanding of the participants needs before working with them to tell personal stories. The facilitator should assess the needs of the group or individual before the session. The facilitator can then ensure that each person has their needs met during the sessions.


Assessing needs beforehand will help the facilitator to be properly prepared and meet each individual’s needs as well as the needs of the group as a whole. It may require certain resources being collected to be used during session, requesting extra support or preparing the space appropriately beforehand.


The facilitator can complete the needs assessment in number of ways. They may wish to complete a needs assessment form or make a list, or they could record an audio memo as a reminder of what they need to consider or prepare in advance.


However they decide to do it is up to the facilitator the most important thing is that they consider the following aspects.


  • How many participants will they be working with. One or more?

  • What any specific needs do the participant/s have?

  • How will they assess the needs of individual members and group as a whole?

  • What specific support need to be put in place beforehand?

  • Where will the practice take place?

  • How will the space impact on the practice?

  • How will the facilitator ensure its safe?

  • How will the needs impact on the space and timings of the session?

  • How will they facilitate planning and implementation of relevant activities that promote positive group and individual work?




Activity 1

If you are working with a group, ask them to work in pairs (A and B).

A and B then take turns to find out about the target groups/individuals they are working with by asking the following questions.


  • How many participants will they be working with? One or more?

  • What any specific needs do the participant/s have?

  • How will they assess the needs of individual members and group as a whole?

  • What specific support need to be put in place beforehand?

  • Where will the practice take place?

  • How will the space impact on the practice?

  • How will the facilitator ensure its safe?

  • How will the needs impact on the space and timings of the session?

  • How will they facilitate planning and implementation of relevant activities that promote positive group and individual work?


Write the answers down on a flip chart for each person and share with the whole group.

30 mins


Lead a Q and A and group discussion of what, if any needs assessment they will do now and how they will go forward.

15 mins


Show an example of a need’s assessment form. Discuss its pro’s and con’s. 15 mins

If working with an individual do the same but on a ‘one to one ‘basis. This will be much shorter.


Working with Individuals and Groups

Participants may want to work with both individuals and with groups. This activity concentrates on how you can adapt to work with individuals and /or groups.


Activity 2

Start off with a short overview of working with different groups and settings. Show examples of individual work and group work. Ask the group who they work with, individuals or groups.

5 – 10 mins


Ask the group to get into pairs, with one who is used to working with groups and with the other who is used to working with individuals.



Ask them to use their needs assessment and together they will identify and list (using flipchart paper and pens) the different requirements needed for each.


Ask them to consider these elements and how they relate to the approach of the facilitator.


  • Showing empathy

  • Being consistent

  • Being organised

  • Having integrity

  • Being friendly and approachable

  • Keeping a professional distance

  • Being optimistic

  • Motivating others

  • Being non-judgemental

  • Trust and Confidentiality

  • Size of group and timings

  • Letting everyone have their say

  • Safeguarding


30 mins (15 mins each person)


Each pair shares with the whole group.

Q and A and group discussion of what the requirements are and how they may need to adapt their needs assessment to accommodate these requirements. 30 mins


Refer the participants to further reading and information.

Outcomes:

Participants will be familiar with how to assess the needs of a group. The participants will gain an understanding of their specific participant’s

needs.

Evaluation/ Learn Check:

This training is for participants who have a good level of literacy.

Any participants who have additional needs must have support to be able to

take part.

Further Background/references:

https://www.iriss.org.uk/resources/insights/strengths-based-approaches-working-individuals

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21675331/ https://infed.org/mobi/group-work/


https://infed.org/facilitating-learning-and-change-in-groups-and-group- sessions/

Session 2

The Purpose of Storytelling for Wellbeing

Aims:

It is important for a facilitator to have an understanding of what the group or the individual wants to achieve through the storytelling sessions. This helps you to guide the participant/s through the process and helps to determine what the group or individual want to achieve through the storytelling session.


For different target groups there will be different goals.

  • Working ‘one to one’ the participant may want to explore a difficult past event or celebrate a life affirming event.

  • An individual may want to inform others about their own lived experience.

  • Working with a group of older people who have dementia the goals will be different. The goal might be to have a digital story that they can refer back to aid their memory.

  • A community of interest may want to explore an issue that has affected them as a community and may want to share their collective lived experience on a social media platform.

Resources:

Prepared community group setting scenarios. Risk Assessment template

Computers and ‘Flinga’ software (optional) https://demo.flinga.fi/ Paper, pens, flipchart paper.

Duration:

45 mins – 1.15 hour

Procedure

Start off with each participant introducing themselves and the reason they are there and what they want to discover.

5-10 mins

Give out pens, paper and pre prepared scenarios of groups and settings

(see resources).

Ask the group to split into pairs and to discuss the different scenarios, identify what the purpose of the practise of storytelling in each scenario. Put this question to the group and in the pairs apply it to the scenarios

‘How does the purpose of the practice impact on the process?’

20 -30 mins

Hold a short discussion with the whole group about what they have discovered. List the key points of learning.

20 – 30 mins

Outcomes:

Participants will gain an understanding of how the purpose impacts on the process.


Evaluation/ Learn Check:

This training is for participants who have a good level of literacy.

Any participants who have additional needs must have support to be able to take part.

Further Background/references:

https://www.gov.scot/publications/national-programme-improving- mental-health-well-being-small-research-projects-initiative-2006- matters-personal-narratives/

Stop 2

Approaches for well-being

Introduction:

This stop concentrates on exploring the following specific methodologies;


The Community Reporter Methodology The Tree Of Life Approach

Harvesting Memories – Reminiscence Storytelling Choosing an approach


and supports the participants to consider an appropriate method, or methods, that can be used in their setting, with specific groups or individual/s.

Objectives:

To explore different methods when working with specific groups of people and individuals.

Time:

10 – 12 hours depending on the size of the group.

Preparation

Use a needs assessment sheet (Stop 1 Session 1) as a basis to inform

your approach and tailor your preparation to suit the needs.

Facilitation Style

The facilitation style should be relaxed, informal and personal. The

participants must feel comfortable in the space.

Target groups.

Learning Check/ Evaluation

This training is for participants who have a good level of literacy.

Any participants who have additional needs must have support to be able to take part.


Session 1

The Community Reporter Approach

Introduction:

The Community Reporter method uses digital tools to support people to tell their own stories in their own ways.

Central to the Community Reporting methodology is the belief that, people telling authentic stories, about their own lived experience, offers valuable understanding of their lives. In creating spaces in which people can describe their own realities Community Reporting provides opportunities in which people can use storytelling to:

Find their voice – Through storytelling we can have our say on topics pertinent to our lives.

Challenge perceptions – Through listening to different experiences than our own, our understandings of the world can widen.

Be catalysts of change – Through taking responsibility to act on what we have learned from other people’s experiences we can be part of positive social change.

The methodology is based on the ‘Cynefin framework’ which helps people to make better decisions and influence change in complex environments.

Cynefin, pronounced "ku-nev-in," is a Welsh word that translates as "place" or "habitat." However, it can also be used to describe the elements of our situation and personal history that influence our thoughts and decisions in ways we don't understand.

It will be useful for the facilitator to look at the psychology behind the methodology beforehand.

https://clear-impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Intro-to- Cynefin-Model.pdf https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/cynefin-framework.htm


It is possible to take this methodology and apply it to personal development and counselling work. Working with individuals and/or groups to talk about their own lived experiences, to record these stories using digital tools that can be then used to reflect on, or if they so wish, to share in some way.

Aims:

To explore this methodology of digital storytelling for well-being.

Resources:

Computers, tablets or phones with internet access.

Duration:

1.50 – 2 hours depending on the size of the group

Procedure:

Start off with each participant introducing themselves and the reason they are there and what they want to discover.

5-10 mins



Introduce the Methodology

Present a short introductory power-point about the Community Reporters methodology, explaining where the methodology comes from and how it’s been used. If you don’t have a computer then give out a handout for the participants to look at and go through it with them. On slide 8 of the power-point go on to….


Explore the Methodology – Snapshot Story

Ask the group to split into pairs practice using the Snapshot Story technique. Ask A to film B and then swap over. Ask one question each then review the story.


In pairs discuss if and how they might use this. Pairs to report back to the group.


40 mins


Continue to go through the power-point and look at Dialogue interviews (just give an overview they can look at these in further detail next).


Most importantly is the section on Responsible Storytelling.

Ask the participants how they would uphold the ethics of responsible storytelling in their practice?


10 – 20 mins


Further Exploration of Community Reporting

Once again in pairs (A and B) ask them to go onto the community reporter website https://communityreporter.net/

and watch some films made by community reporters. They can search for specific films that relate to the sector they work in i.e, mental health, unemployment, young people, etc.

15 – 20 mins


Ask the pairs to discuss the 3 different areas (below) that Community Reporting focuses on and how they may use this in their setting.


Find their voice – Through storytelling we can have our say on topics pertinent to our lives.

Challenge perceptions – Through listening to different experiences than our own, our understandings of the world can widen.

Be catalysts of change – Through taking responsibility to act on what we have learned from other people’s experiences we can be part of positive social change.



In pairs discuss if and how they might use this. Pairs to report back to the group.


15 – 20 mins


Refer the participants to further reading and information.

Outcomes:

Participants will have explored this methodology and with a view of how

they could use it in their specific setting.

Target Group

This method works very well when working with groups or individuals who have a specific issue that they want to explore.

This training is accessible to everyone no matter what level of education they are at.

Any participants who have additional needs must have support to be able tell their story. The needs assessment will indicate what support is needed.

Further Background/references:

https://peoplesvoicemedia.co.uk/ https://peoplesvoicemedia.co.uk/our-network/ https://communityreporter.net/

https://clear-impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Intro-to- Cynefin-Model.pdf https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/cynefin-framework.htm

Session 2

The Tree Of Life Approach

Introduction:

The Tree Of Life approach enables people to speak about their lives in ways that make them stronger. It involves people drawing their own ‘tree of life’ in which they get to speak of their ‘roots’ (where they come from), their skills and knowledge, their hopes and dreams, as well as the special people in their lives. The participants then join their trees into a ‘forest of life’ and, in groups, discuss some of the ‘storms’ that affect their lives and ways that they respond to these storms, protect themselves, and each other.


Originally developed to assist vulnerable children in East and Southern Africa, Tree Of Life draws on the metaphor of a tree, taken from Zimbabwean folklore and collective narrative practice to support groups and communities to overcome difficult life experiences.


This approach works very for a wide range of groups and in many different community settings (children and young people, people with PTSD, people with mental health issues such as depression).

It is particularly beneficial for people undergoing a group experience (communities of interest) and it can also be used for individuals to explore their own personal development.


This approach supports people to speak about their lives in ways that are not retraumatising, but instead strengthens their relationships with their own history, their culture, and significant people in their lives.


The Tree Of Life comes from the psychological methodology of Narrative therapy. This seeks to be a respectful, non-blaming approach to counselling and community work, which centres people as the experts in their own lives. It views problems as separate from people and assumes people have many skills, competencies, beliefs, values, commitments and abilities that will assist them to reduce the influence of problems in their lives.

Aims:

To explore this approach of personal storytelling in a digital storytelling

context.

Resources:

Computers, tablets, phones to use the internet. Internet connection.

Handout about the Tree Of Life.

Flipchart, paper and pens (different colours).

Duration:

2- 2.15 session depending on the size of the group.

Procedure:

Introduce the Approach

Use the power-point presentation to introduce the Tree Of Life (see resources), explaining where the approach comes from and how it’s been used, and use it as a guide to take you and the group through the process.



Explore the Approach

For the participants to understand the process it will be useful to take them through a pared down version of the process.



Give out flip chart paper and pens to individuals.


Ask them to draw a tree. Something like the tree in the image above with the roots, trunk, branches, leaves and fruit or blossom. Then lead them through the process.

The Roots

Ask the participants to write down where they come from on the roots (hometown, state, country, etc.) They can also write down; the culture they grew up in, any club or organisations or people, a parent/guardian, or friends/peers, that shaped their youth.

The Ground

The participants write down the things they choose to do on a weekly basis on the ground. These should not be things they are forced to do, but rather things they want to do for themself.

The Trunk

Write their skills and values on the trunk. The Branches

Write down hopes, dreams, and wishes on the branches. These can be personal, communal, or general to all of mankind. Both long and short term. Spread them around the various branches.

The Leaves

Write down the names of those who are significant to them in a positive way. Their friends, family, pets, heroes, etc.

The Fruits

Write down the legacies that have been passed on to them. They can begin by looking at the names they wrote on leaves and think about the impact they’ve had on them over the years. This can be material, such as an inheritance, but most often this will be attributes such as courage, generosity, kindness, etc.

(if the tree is crowded by this point, they could try drawing some baskets of fruit at the base of your tree and label them accordingly

there)



The Flowers & Seeds

Write down the legacies they wish to leave to others on the flowers and seeds.

30 – 60 mins


Ask the group to split into pairs and use Q and A to discover what the participant’s felt about the exercise, in relation to how they would use it. Encourage them to explore the advantages and disadvantages that the approach has, what target groups they could use it with and how they might go ahead and use it.

15 – 20 mins


Exploration of Applying Digital Storytelling Techniques Introduce the different tools and mediums there are to tell a story digitally. Direct the participants to the Using Digital Tools stop on the underground map.


Phone – to take photos, record video and audio

Tablet - to take photos, record video and audio and to edit and share Stills Camera - to take photos and video

Video Camera - to record, video and audio

Computer – to store, edit and share using different social media platforms.


In pairs discuss what tools and they would use, how they would use them and why.

Pairs to report back to the group. 15 – 20 mins


Hold a short discussion with the whole group about what they have discovered and how they might go onto use this approach in their future work.

15 – 20 mins


Refer the participants to further reading and information.

Outcomes:

Participants will have explored this approach with a view of how they could use it in specific settings.

Target Group

This can be delivered to individuals or groups.

This methodology is accessible to everyone no matter what level of education they are at. However, any participants who have additional needs, such as literacy must have support in place to be able tell their

story. A needs assessment will indicate what support is needed.

Further Background/references:

https://dulwichcentre.com.au/the-tree-of-life/ https://dulwichcentre.com.au/wp- content/uploads/2014/01/tree-of-life-community-context.pdf https://positivepsychology.com/narrative-therapy/



Denborough, D. (2008). Collective narrative practice: Responding to individuals, groups, and communities who have experienced trauma. Adelaide: Dulwich Centre Publications.


https://soundcloud.com/baatnpodcast/the-tree-of-life-episode- 21


https://dulwichcentre.com.au/wp- content/uploads/2014/01/tree-of-life-in-burma.pdf

Session 3

Harvesting Memories – Reminiscence

Storytelling

Introduction

This approach uses Reminiscence Therapy to work with people to support the; celebration of lived experiences; fostering of a positive outlook; aid of cognitive functioning, mood and communication.


Studies have shown that the use of Reminiscence Therapy with people who have dementia or Alzheimer's has improved both, cognitive function and quality of life factors, like happiness and mood — both of which appear to be positively influenced by the use of directed personal and autobiographical storytelling.


This can also be a helpful approach to use when working with individuals who have depression and can also be used to great benefit in grief/bereavement counselling.


Reminiscence Therapy involves discussing events and experiences from the past. It aims to evoke memories, stimulate mental activity and improve well-being. It is often assisted by props such as videos, pictures and objects. It can take place in a group or be done with a person on their own, when it often results in some form of life-story book being created. There is some evidence to show that the group work with people with dementia and Alzheimer’s has more benefit than one to one work. https://www.linkedsenior.com/blog/2012/01/cognitive- benefits-of-small-groups-with-dementia/

The main benefits to the individual are cited as follows: Empowerment

Raised self-esteem Improved communication Stimulation and fun Enhanced mood


Using Digital storytelling in this context means that the participants can have something to look back, like a memory book that will remind them of their; past life, their loved ones and precious personal memories.

Aims:

To explore this approach of reminiscence therapy in a digital storytelling context.

Materials:

Paper, pens. Mobile phones, tablets or video cameras, computers.

A variety of different objects to use as stimuli.

Duration:

3.15 – 3.5 hours

Procedure:

Start off with each participant introducing themselves and the reason they are there and what they want to discover.

5-10 mins



Introduce the Approach

Present the short introductory power-point (see resources) about the Reminiscence Storytelling approach, explaining where the approach comes from and how it’s been used. If you don’t have a computer then give out a handout for the participants to look at and go through it with them.

Q and A about it. 15 mins


Reminiscence Storytelling Exercises - Memory Joggers

These exercises will help the participants to understand how powerful reminiscent storytelling is, and how stimuli can in trigger a number of emotions. It is useful for the participants to try this out to develop empathy.


Ask the participants to choose one thing from a list of themes ask them to think about memories that they have that go with that theme. Pick a memory. Then share the memory with the group.


For example –

School – Prompt by giving examples - dinners, favourite teachers, friends.

Pets - family pets, friends pet, etc.

Holidays – family holidays, first holiday as an adult or adolescent.

Toys – favourite toy, first toy.

Sweets - (Chocolate, candy) - favourite sweets from your childhood.

Music – what was the first record you ever bought and why?


It can be helpful to give them some prompts to help them remember and they may want to close their eyes whilst doing this. Give them a couple of minutes to remember. While they are remembering. Ask them about what colours they see, what sounds they hear, are there are any smells, is in there anybody with them.

(5 mins)


Then go around the room and ask the participants to share their memory with the group. After they have shared their stories give out post it notes and ask them to write how they feel. Ask the participants to put the post-it notes on the wall.

30 - 40 mins

Go through the post-it notes. Lead a short discussion around the feelings triggered by the memories in relation to the groups they will be working with.

10 mins



Using Stimuli

Put a number of objects on a table. The objects should have a sensory element to them; taste, feel, smell, visual images. For example; teddy bears, sweets, coffee beans, chocolate, fruit, garlic, photographs, records, wool, string, textiles, toothpaste, perfume, cough sweets, sparkly things, torches, matches, jewellery, etc. If you can old fashioned objects that will help. Ensure you have more than enough (more than one of each object) so each participant has a choice. Ask the participants to choose an object.

Give out paper and pens. Ask the participants to sit with the object and write down why they chose the object. Why did it appeal to them?

Ask them to get into pairs and tell each other about why they chose the object. Ask if the object evokes any memories?


Go around the group finding out how the objects made them feel. Explain how stimuli can be used to help induce memories.

30-40 mins


Explore the Approach

Ask the group to split into pairs and ask them to discuss the approach, in relation to how they would use it in the setting where they work.

Ask them to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the approach and how they might go ahead and use it. Put their thoughts down on a piece of flipchart paper ready to report back to the group.

20 mins


Hold a short discussion with the whole group about what they have discovered and how they might go onto use this approach in their future work.

15 mins


Exploration of Applying Digital Storytelling Techniques Introduce the different tools and mediums there are to tell a story digitally. Direct the participants to the Using Digital Tools stop on the underground map.


Phone – to take photos, record video and audio

Tablet - to take photos, record video and audio and to edit and share Stills Camera - to take photos and video

Video Camera - to record, video and audio

Computer – to store, edit and share using different social media platforms.


In pairs discuss what tools they would use, how and why. Pairs to report back to the group.

15 - 20 mins



Hold a short discussion with the whole group about what they have discovered about digital storytelling and how they might go onto use it in their future work.

15 mins


Refer the participants to further reading and information and to the module called ‘Using Digital Tools.’

Outcomes:

Participants will have explored using this approach with a view of how they could use it in their specific setting.

Target Groups

This methodology can be used with a number of specific groups;

  • people with memory loss, such as people with dementia, head injuries, etc.

  • people have who have depression

  • people who are bereaved.

This can be delivered to individuals or groups.

This methodology is accessible to everyone no matter what level of education they are at. However, any participants who have additional needs, such as literacy must have support in place to be able tell their story.

A needs assessment will indicate what support is needed.

Further Background/references:

Bohlmeijer, Ernst, Marte Roemer, and Pim Cuijpers. "The Effects of Reminiscence on Psychological Well-being in Older Adults: A Meta- analysis." Aging & Mental Health 11.3 (2007)


Pittiglio, Laura. "Use of Reminiscence Therapy in Patients With Alzheimer's Disease." Lippincott's Case Management 5.5 (November/December, 2000): 216-20.


Tadaka, Etsuko; Kanagawa, Katsuko (1 June 2007). "Effects of reminiscence group in elderly people with Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia in a community setting". Geriatrics & Gerontology International. 7 (2): 167–173


Tanaka, Katsuaki; Yamada, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Sonohara, Kazuki; Machida, Ayako; Nakai, Ryuhei; Kozaki, Koichi; Toba, Kenji. "Improved cognitive function, mood, and brain blood flow in single photon emission computed tomography following individual reminiscence therapy in an elderly patient with Alzheimer's disease." Geriatrics & Gerontology International. 7(3): 305–309.


https://www.scie.org.uk/dementia/living-with-dementia/keeping- active/reminiscence.asp https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26341034/ https://www.iriss.org.uk/resources/insights/supporting- dementia-reminiscence-therapy-life-story-work https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia- professionals/resources-professionals/memories-are-made-

reminiscence-activities-person-centred-care



https://trauma-acute-care.imedpub.com/the-effects-of- reminiscence-therapy-on-depressive-symptoms-among-elderly- an-evidence-based-review.php?aid=21865 https://sites.ualberta.ca/~jennyy/PDFs/17540048.pdf https://www.dailysparkle.co.uk/storytelling-for-carers/ https://www.goldencarers.com/reminiscing/ https://www.lifebio.org/blog/news/storytelling-and- reminiscence-therapy-for-people-with-alzheimer-s-or-another- form-of-dementia/ https://www.linkedsenior.com/blog/2012/01/cognitive- benefits-of-small-groups-with-dementia/ https://srcarecenter.com/article/the-power-of-nostalgia-

reminiscence-therapy-for-seniors-with-dementia/

Session 4

Choosing Your Approach

Introduction

This session explores each approach in relation to using it with a specific group/setting.

Aims:

The participant will identify what approach or approaches are the most appropriate for them to use with their specific group and in a specific

setting.

Materials:

Paper, Flipchart paper, pens. Mobile phones, tablets or computers and internet.

Duration:

2.5 – 3 hours depending on the group size (3 is based on 12)

Procedure:

Start off with a short overview (sees power point in resources) of each of the approaches and methods ‘Community Reporting’, ‘Tree Of Life’ and ‘Harvesting Memories’.

5 – 10 mins

Ask the group, to individually prepare a short presentation (10 mins) followed by a short Q and A on what approach/method they would use and why.

Ask them to include the following.

  • Who are the group or individuals they work with.

  • The setting in which they work. (health and social care, community development, education, etc)

  • The space in which they will work. (if they know)

  • How long they have to work with them.

  • What are the specific needs the group or individuals may have?

And ask them to consider any challenges they may have in applying this approach/method. 15 mins


Each participant presents to the group.

(5 mins each presentation, include 5 mins for Q and A from the group)

– 10 mins each


Finish the session with a short discussion about what they have discovered. 10 mins

Outcomes:

Each participant explores each approach and decides on a tailored facilitation approach.

Target Groups

Each methodology/approach can be delivered to individuals or groups. These methodologies/approaches are accessible to everyone no matter what level of education they are at. However, any participants who have additional needs, such as literacy must have support in place to be able tell their story. A needs assessment will indicate what

support is needed.


Further Background/references:

Refer to Further Background/references in sessions 1, 2 and 3 of this Stop for more information about each methodology.

Stop 3

Storytelling for Well-being and Ethics

Introduction:

This stop allows a facilitator to explore and consider how best to deliver responsible and ethical practice in their chosen setting.

It is important to recognise the ethical implications of digital storytelling and provide a safe space where participants can be assured of their emotional safety during the process and afterwards.


This stop studies the ethics of Digital Storytelling for Well-being ensuring that facilitators are familiar with codes of practice and will be able to implement systems that support emotional safety for their participants and possibly for themselves.


When working with groups and individuals’ facilitators may find that the participants reveal hidden ideas, beliefs, values and secrets that are extremely personal and maybe of a sensitive nature, so it is vitally important to practice responsibly and ensure that confidentiality is upheld.


Creating a safe space where individuals can express themselves freely and openly is vital.

Objectives:

To consider the implications of storytelling for well-being. To become aware of best practice.

Time:


2 hours

Preparation

A thorough needs assessment should be conducted before delivering the sessions.

Collection of resources.

A session plan that include timings.

Making the space comfortable and accessible.

Facilitation Style

The facilitation style should be relaxed, informal and personal. The participants must feel comfortable in the space.

Learning Check/ Evaluation

This training is for participants who have a good level of literacy.

Any participants who have additional needs must have support to be able to take part.


Session 1

Using the stories - Consent, confidentiality

and emotional safety.

Aims:

To identify and recognise the ethics of digital storytelling.

To explore methods to ensure confidentiality and consent are practiced.

Resources:

Paper, Flipchart paper, pens. Mobile phones, tablets or computers and internet.

Duration:

2 hours

Procedure

Start off with each participant introducing themselves and the reason they are there and what they want to discover.

5-10 mins


Deliver a Q and A. Ask the group what they think ethical storytelling is? List their answers on board, computer or flipchart.

5-10 mins


Split the group into small groups. Give each group the following areas –

Consent and ownership

Emotional safety and confidentiality Safeguarding


Ask the group to discuss the area in relation to ethics and digital storytelling and identify what systems they could put in place to ensure that they can implement responsible and ethical practice.


Ask them to consider these questions -

  • Whose story is it? - How can they ensure that the participant has full ownership of their story?

  • How may the person feel when telling their story?

  • How can they support their participants and their own well - being during the process?

  • Who will watch the story?

  • Where will the story be shown and what are the implications of this?

  • What can you do to create trust?

  • Are the legal implications? (consent)

  • How can the organisation you work with support you?

  • If you are freelance how can you protect yourself?

  • What methods, techniques, paperwork (risk assessments, consent forms, disclosure procedures and paperwork) can be put in place to protect the participant and yourself?



Encourage them to use their own experiences of working with people and organisations to inform their answers and ask them to create their own safe practice guide to present to the group.


The ‘Prepared Community Individual and Group Setting Scenarios’ handout in resources might be useful to use as examples, especially if the participants are new facilitators/practitioners.


30 mins


Each group presents their findings with the whole group. Make notes of the main points.

30 - 40 mins


Ask them, Individually, to write down if there is anything new, they will add to their future practice to enhance their delivery and to implement best practice. Discuss.

20- 30 mins


Refer the participants to further reading and information.

Outcomes:

The participants will have explored the ethical implications of storytelling for well-being.

The participants will have identified tools to help them implement systems that protect themselves and their clients.

Evaluation/ Learn Check:

This training is for participant’s who have a good level of literacy.

Any participants who have additional needs must have support to be able to take part.

Further Background/references:


https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/catching- homelessness/201909/exposed-the-ethics-storytelling


https://dulwichcentre.com.au/charter-of-story-telling-rights/ https://gettingattention.org/blog/ethical-storytelling/

https://www.transformativestory.org/good-practice-in- transformative-storytelling/ethical-practice/







Digital Storytelling for Well-being

Training Frame

Trained skills and aims:

Digital Storytelling for Well-being training is centred around the therapeutic qualities of personal storytelling of the lived experience, assisting in an individual’s own personal health and well-being and improving, developing and supporting the following.

Personal skills:

Self-confidence Catharsis

Social and emotional literacy

Cognitive development - new perspectives and insight about oneself and others

Compassion - Memory


Communication skills:

Confidence in speaking Sequencing

Listening Empathy


This training module is for facilitators/practitioners from various settings, such as health and social care, community development, informal education, etc who want to use digital storytelling in their work with groups and /or individuals.

Target groups:

The groups/individuals who may have find Digital Storytelling for Well- being beneficial are:-

Groups who have a shared experience/issue. Older people who have dementia or Alzheimer’s. Children and young people exploring empathy. Children with emotional and behavioural issues. Adults undergoing counselling.

Room:

A medium sized room (The room size will depend on the number of participants) with tables and chairs, internet access and data projector would be an advantage but not essential.

These practices could also be delivered online.

Materials:

Laptop, tablet or mobile phone, computers and internet connection. Flipchart paper, Pens.


Duration:

13 hours This could be delivered over 2 days or short sessions over a number of days.

Narrative Guideline/ Procedures during facilitating the line

This training is for facilitators who wish to explore different methods and approaches to use to support individuals and groups, aiming to encourage individuals to tell a personal story from a lived experience to enhance their well-being.

These approaches and methods can be used to support people with specific mental health issues such as depression, people with dementia, and it can also be used to empower individuals own personal development.

Other considerations or limitations (e.g. ethical, pre-conditions of learner etc.)

The specific issues that will need to be considered are ones of support. Some of the content that individuals may disclose may be of a sensitive nature so it will important to ensure that a support system is in place; before starting the workshops, during the workshop and post workshops. The support may come in the form of support workers, other key workers, or from a separate agency that can offer a relevant service. The support system should also offer support for the facilitators.



Return

Training Excercises

Additional materials

Training Overview

TOP 1

INTRODUCTION

-GETTING READY FOR STORYTELLING

Introduction:

This stop will help the participant to understand the potential of storytelling and reflect on the main reasons to use storytelling as a tool.

What are the different purposes of telling a story? How can we categorize stories?

Why is it important to set a goal?


Participants will use a hands-on approach where they will reflect on their own role in the story, putting into practice all the elements of storytelling that are presented along with the exercises.

Objectives:

  • Defining focus for telling the stories

  • Finding the stories focus by listening to and defining the genre and the style of communication

  • The stories you tell – Your story´s aim/ which emotion will it leave your audience with or motivation to take an action?

  • Background for storytelling

  • Basic building blocks for storytelling

  • Ethics, trust & credibility - a guide to defining the rules for storytelling

  • Links to sites on storytelling for personal and community story- work.

Time:

1h 30 min – 1h 45 min

Preparation:


Facilitation style:


Learning Check/Evaluation:



Session activity 1.1

WHY DO WE TELL STORIES?

Aims:

The aim of this session is to reflect on what are the main reasons for storytelling. The session will demonstrate how stories are an inevitable part of everyday life; each experience makes an impression within us and our version of the world is shaped into the stories we tell.

It will demonstrate the story that resonates, creates a connection, inspires reflection & builds a relationship with the listener.

Materials:

Pencils/Pens, Paper

Duration:

50 – 60 min

Procedure:

Ask the participants to think about and write down the following questions (20 -30 min):





Where I am Now?

Take a moment to think about and write down the basics of your biography and where you are at now.


Difficult moments

Write down 1-3 ‘difficult moments’ you’ve experienced. In these difficult moments find out how you reacted and why. There will be valuable insights for you in this reflection. You will often find a special incident you have experienced in life, which became a catalyst moment that shifted things in your life leading to an important insight and ‘breakthrough’ for you. After this moment you felt stronger and more able to achieve what you wanted in life.


Breakthrough

Write out the transformation you made as a result of your breakthrough by backtracking the steps from your new gained insight back to the troublesome incidents. Look for the “golden threads” that are woven into your story, which help you to connect with your breakthrough.


Lessons Learned

Take some time to write out the core truths and main lessons you have learned that have helped you get to where you are today. What did you learn from these experiences in the process from being in a troublesome situation and to experiencing a successful outcome?


Why

Take some time to get clear about these insights and write out your why’s behind the work you do.


Reconnect

How can you reconnect with the audience and draw a line for them to why your speech is important for them? Write out how you will bring these insights to them.


Ask participants to share their notes in pairs (5-10 min).


Ask participants if they want to share their notes and genera reflections about the exercise with the group (5-10 min)


Reflect with participants on different examples- Why do we tell stories (5-10 min):

  • To feel alive (they stimulate our senses and emotions)

  • To be a part of a community (Help us define our identity)

  • To learn from our mistakes (to not be eaten by the sable tooth tiger)

  • If we care – we want to share

  • To motivate, engage and affect others

  • To make data and facts easier to obtain and use

Outcomes:

Participants should understand the power of the storytelling through their own experience, how stories create connection between people, and that each one of us has a unique story, which is worth sharing and from which we can learn a lot. This idea also resonates with the saying: I tell my story, therefore, I am.

Evaluation/ Learn Check:


Further Background/references:

Laura Kamis Wrang

actress, international storyteller, and voice artist. www.2in1voices.dk

FB: fortælle salonen


Illustration by Maria Wrang-Rasmussen

BA intermedia art, Edinburgh University 2021 Instagram: maria.WR_art


Session activity 1.2

THE PURPOSE OF THE STORY

Aims:

The aim of this session is to reflect on what are the main purposes of a story. Participants will discuss how the purpose of the story can affect its content and shape.

Materials:


Duration:

30 min

Procedure:

Introduce to participants the four (4) different purpose of the story (10- 15 min):

Entertain >

You are in focus - Lighthearted – Passionate – Emotional

Interact >

Both you and your audience focus on an exchange

Educate >

You are the authority - the effect of the story is in focus

Lead >

The stories message is meant to make people do…?

ENTERTAIN

INTERACT

EDUCATE

LEAD

Entertaining

Involving

Enlightening

Guiding


Funny

Empathetic

Knowledge Packed

Directional

Light- hearted

Relaxed

Educational

Practical

Thought

Evoking

Group Centred

Fact and

Figure based

Catchy

Witty

Involving

Curriculum Centred

Action entered

Edutaining

Inquisitive

Qualifying

Hands on

Surprising

Transformational

Measurable

Honourable

Non-formal

Challenging

Inspiring

Defining

Solo act

Team based

Goal Setting

WINNER MINDSET

Fellowship

Conversational

Competitive

Loyalty


Share in a smaller group your thoughts about your favorite stories. (10-15 min):

  • Which stories do you enjoy listening to?

  • What are the stories about?

  • Which stories do you wish to share with others?

  • What do you think of how your stories will leave your listeners?

  • Are they filled with joyful sensations, contemplative or some other sensation?

Outcomes:


Evaluation/ Learn Check:


Further Background/references:

Laura Kamis Wrang

actress, international storyteller, and voice artist. www.2in1voices.dk

FB: fortælle salonen


Illustration by Maria Wrang-Rasmussen

BA intermedia art, Edinburgh University 2021 Instagram: maria.WR_art


Session activity 1.3

THE CATEGORIES OF STORIES

Aims:

The aim of this session is to introduce the categories and elements in a story. Reflect on how we are part of the stories that we tell, focusing on the personal dimension of storytelling. Practice storytelling while considering the influence of the different elements and categories previously learned.

Materials:

Laptop, projector, pencils/pens, papers

Duration:

60 min

Procedure:

I PART: Participants will be introduced to three (3) categories of stories (20 min):

  • ”ME” STORIES - WHY IS TELLING STORIES IMPORTANT TO YOU? PERSONAL STORIES

    Your story, your view of the world. your values? Why you? What difference do you make? Why are you unique?

  • ” WE” STORIES build a relationship - WHAT THEMES DO YOU COVER? UNIFYING STORIES


    What are you part of? What do you and others relate to? What makes a difference to you? What are you passionate about? What changes do you wish for?

  • ” WHAT” STORIES - WHAT FACTS ARE NEEDED = CREDIBIILITY - CONTENT STORIES

Share facts and figures. Which are necessary? Nice to have or need to have? How do you choose to share them? Heart and soul? Can you create a surprise?


II PART: To best help a person share their story, they must be ready to share it. Take one story as an example and analyze it using the following points/questions (20 min):


Go from private – personal – interpersonal. Prepare them to reframe criticism.

Know how not to take criticism personally. Always be aware of the audiences.

Where are they?

What is the room like? What time of day is it? Can you be heard & seen?

What language level is being spoken?

Speak slowly and clearly. Let them ask questions or… not.





III PART: Practice storytelling in pairs paying attention on different elements within the story categories (20 min):

  1. Have a good story to tell… one that awakens feelings/ sharpens the listeners senses/ asks questions/ talks about problems and offers a solution to them.

  2. Sharing your passion will show why you are unique.

  3. Create clear pictures – as steppingstones from start, to middle to end.

  4. Drive your story forward with action words. Speak to the listeners senses by painting with many colors through your voice and phrases.

  5. Practice your story – Be dynamic – rich in nuance – like music

  6. Share the story – learn from telling it – adapt and enjoy!

Outcomes:


Evaluation/ Learn Check:


Further Background/references:

Laura Kamis Wrang

actress, international storyteller, and voice artist. www.2in1voices.dk

FB: fortælle salonen


Illustration by Maria Wrang-Rasmussen

BA intermedia art, Edinburgh University 2021 Instagram: maria.WR_art

STOP 2

TELL A STORY

Introduction:

This stop will introduce initial understanding of storytelling, defining the goal and the main elements of the story is the key when creating a successful storytelling performance.

Determining the intention or purpose of the story or message is an important first step in crafting the message.

Objectives:

  1. Goal setting

  2. Clarifying different elements of story

  3. Realizing the aims of storytelling in a non-formal educational context

  4. How the aims and elements influence the story crafting


In the context of non-formal education through storytelling, learning is enhanced, thus participants can develop a large set of abilities, such as:

  • Capacity to concentrate and pay attention to details

  • Critical thinking

  • Dealing with fears

  • Capacity of acceptance

  • Let go of own prejudices


  • Connecting

Time:

1h 30min – 2h

Preparation:


Facilitation style:


Learning Check/Evaluation:



Session activity 2.1

BASICS OF STORYTELLING

Aims:

What makes a story a good story? How to set up a good story using the basic elements of storytelling, which are, setting, characters, plot, and conflict.

Materials:

Pencils/Pens, Paper

Duration:

20-30 min.

Procedure:

Ask the participants to remember what their favorite story was when they were kids. Let them reflect on the following questions: Why was that your favorite? Do you think it was a good story? Why? (Sharing is optional)

In your own words, write a detailed description of the setting in your picture. Include many adjectives and do not forget to include descriptions for each of the five senses: see, hear, feel, smell, taste

Outcomes:

The expected outcome is basic understanding of the four basic elements of storytelling and ability to construct a basic storyline.

Evaluation/ Learn Check:

Ask participants to recount the basics of storytelling using their own words/examples from the activities.

Further Background/references:



Session activity 2.2

S.P.E.E.C.H – KEY ELEMENTS OF STORYTELLING

Aims:

This activity aims at equipping participants with an innovative storytelling technique, by highlighting five key talking points for good storytelling. They are S.P.E.E.C.H: storytelling, personality, emotion, entertainment, connection, and how.

Materials:

Pencils, Papers

Duration:

30-40 min

Procedure:

Participants will reflect, discuss and answer following questions pertaining to each talking point to help better understand its relevance to quality storytelling.


Storytelling: Why is storytelling so important?

Shares the unique you. Makes you relatable. Positions you with your big idea.

Key stories worth sharing are …?

(participants share their thoughts in the group)



Personality: What makes you unique? What makes you feel great? What issues do you struggle with?

Describe your personality in 3 words:

(participants share their answer in the group)


What is something important to share about myself? What do people tell me about my personality?

How is this relevant to telling my story?


Emotions: Emotion comes from vividly describing your story, or standing up for what truly matters to you, speaking about only what you really care about and what “lights” you up. When we help the audience to FEEL something, this can become a catalyst for them to choose to make a change happen in their life.

How do you want people to feel?

(participants share their thoughts in the group)


Try to show emotions through your tone, your body language, your vocal variances of speed, pitch, or volume. Never Underestimate the Power of Body Language.

Words (the literal meaning) account for 7%

  • Tone of voice accounts for 38%

  • Body Language accounts for 55%


Entertainment: Create an experience. You could add in humor, vivid images, profound thoughts through your words and by painting a verbal picture. You could also bring in props or an element of performance to your speech.

How can my story be more entertaining?

(participants share their thoughts in the group)


Connection

If you can connect with your audience before, during and after your speech, that is where the magic happens so make sure you determine how you can connect with your audience.

Ways I will connect through my story? (participants share their thoughts in the group)


How: Why is the HOW so important? You want to give your audience an actionable takeaway. All story and no content can leave the audience feeling empty. When you give your audience the how an example of actions to take to make a change, you are giving VALUE. How will I share the ‘how’ behind my story?

(participants share their thoughts in the group)


What are the 3 supporting ideas you will share to support your BIG idea Your Why? Take each idea through the WHAT - WHEN – HOW process to support you WHY:


Outcomes:


Evaluation/ Learn Check:

Answer to the questions will be shared amongst the group for congruence.

Further Background/references:

Inputs from Lori Webb – Speaker, writer, life designer, innovation strategist, creative: https://www.lorimariewebb.com/

Storytelling training under “My story, Your story, Our story” project supported by Nordic Culture Point.


"Personal Story shared with large international audience": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Mt_vtTI67g


Session activity 2.3

STEPS ON THE WAY TO TELL A STORY - Shaping the story

Aims:

The aim of this session is to reflect on what are the main elements of the story, how are they structured and how this structure affects how the audience perceives a story.

Materials:

Paper templates, Pencils

Duration:

30-40 min

Procedure:

Each participant should choose the word as a main topic (ex. Graduation, first job, high-school, travel adventure, festival etc.) and create personal 2-minute story and present for the audience. Write, tell, or improvise a story that utilizes all the elements that are in the template below. Present the story to the audience.



Imagine that each story consists of stages: it has the beginning, the peek, and the end. Describe their history backwards through the personal experience and memories to original idea, motivation, and reason to take this particular action. Personify the “life milestone” and tell its story like an autobiography.



Example:

  1. Tell the story of a travel adventure starting with the initial idea and reason for which you went off on a trip.

  2. Tell the story of a graduation, tracing its history back to the time you choose the program that became the core stone for your career.



Outcomes:

Participants will learn how to identify the importance of story elements in order to formulate original plotlines. Recognizing the different elements, they can bring them together and connect with key elements for effective storytelling.

Evaluation/ Learn Check:

Common reflection: Were they in an alignment? Was the story interesting for the audience to listen to?

Further Background/references:

Laura Kamis Wrang

actress, international storyteller, and voice artist. www.2in1voices.dk

FB: fortælle salonen


Illustration by Maria Wrang-Rasmussen

BA intermedia art, Edinburgh University 2021 Instagram: maria.WR_art

STOP 3

UNDERSTAND NARRATIVES



Introduction:

This stop will demonstrate how everyday personal stories are most often about retelling experiences from one's own everyday life. This simple and undemanding form of attachment does not require much imagination, but still contributes to the development of storytelling competencies, the ability to structure the story and listen.

When talking about personal experiences, the storyteller learns how to describe those experiences, but also how to express the emotions involved. Personal stories strengthen competencies important in communication, such as being able to listen carefully, ask questions, and connect with each other's words and imagery. It should be added that this "personal storytelling" helps develop important social aspects of empathy and mutual understanding.

Personal / narrative stories - the author of stories about their personal experiences concerning important events in their lives, can be emotionally charged and personally significant. If you have strong feelings about an event or person in your life, you will probably write a strong script. These stories are personal if you tell them in your own voice and they reveal personal discoveries and say something personal about the author. The story (meaning) is expressed through the narrative and is visually supported by verbal imagery.

It is very important that the storyteller and the stories they choose to tell are at a stage, where they are ready to told. They must not be private any longer, but have been told in a safe forum, so that they can be shared with others in a more interpersonal format - in this way they will be lifted up to become a common experience.

Objectives:


Time:


Preparation:


Facilitation style:


Learning Check/Evaluation:



Session activity 3.1

FROM PERSONAL TO COLLECTIVE STORYTELLLING

Aims:

The aim of this session is to practice how to formulate a collective story from personal experiences. By this, participants will gain a first contact with the different elements of collective storytelling. It will raise awareness of our interconnexion, and how our knowledge, experience and identities are related and can be shared.

Materials:

Paper, colour pencils

Duration:

20-30 min.

Procedure:

Working in groups of 5 to create the “exquisite face”


A. Divide the paper in 5 sections (one for hair, eyes, nose, lips, and neck).


  1. The first participant starts the drawing, leaving two lines visible for the next participant.

  2. Pass the paper to the right making sure that the previous drawing is well covered. Repeat action until every participant contributes to the drawing.

  3. Open the paper and see the result. Add new details in order to give more identity to the character (pendants, hats, environment, clothes, etc.)


Create a story deciding who is this character, where she/he/it comes from, what is her/his/its job, how old is the character and where does he/she/it live. At the end, all the groups introduce the own character and explain it to the rest of the audience.

Outcomes:

Understanding how common lines bring and create emotions, personality, and background. Understanding which prejudices and ideas the people conceive behind a face. Providing a space for creating a collective story based on personal reflections that generate a collective identity.

Evaluation/ Learn Check:


Further Background/references:

https://3minutosdearte.com/generos-y-tecnicas/cadaver- exquisito/



Session activity 3.2

EVERYONE HAS A STORY TO TELL

Aims:

This activity focuses on showing that no matter who you are, everyone has a story to tell and a story worth telling if the right strategies are used.

Materials:

Pencils, Papers

Duration:

30-40 minutes

Procedure:

The effective points in your personal life stories might lie in the the story-elements, which were experienced during a situation of: Adversity

Hardship Opposition Criticism

Reflecting on how you overcame these obstacles is a way to realize the potential you exerted in doing so. Assisting you as a storyteller to feel more assertive and competent.

This theme of transformation can help your story spur motivation, inspire, and help engage your audience.




Organizing the story: Mark up your notes and outline the main points of the story. What happened - When – Why and then? Questions to ask:

-How should my story be shaped?

-How long should it be?

-What goes into the story and what does not?

-What should be the sequence of the elements?

-How should the elements be mutually weighed?

-How should the listener enter and leave my story?

-Always ask: what do I want to say, why do I want to say it, to whom?

Pay attention to the following criteria and emotions of the story for the recipient:

Importance, Engagement, Current, Presence, Identification, Recognition, Conflict, Suspense, The Unusual (sensation), Surprise.


When you know “Why” the story you want to tell is important, try to tell it by starting with:

“What if... (a student is not listening to your story) continue by bringing up your so