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Transcript

RIGHTS

HUMAN

THE FIGHT FOR

"To deny people their human rights is to challenge their very humanity."

Start

- Nelson Mandela

INDEX

1. WHAT ARE THEY

2. WHICH RIGHTS ARE THEY?

3. HOW DID THEY COME ABOUT?

4. IMPORTANCE

5. TIMELINE

6. DATA

7. SOURCES

1. WHAT ARE HUMAN RIGHTS?

Human rights are standards that recognize and protect the dignity of all human beings. These rights govern the way individuals live in society and relate to each other, as well as their relations with the State and obligations of the State toward them.Human rights laws require governments to do certain things and prevent them from doing others.

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Human rights belong equally to each and every one of us.

"INJUSTICEANYWHERE IS A THREAT TOJUSTICEeVERYWHERE "

Martin Luther King, African-American civil rights activist.

2. WHICH RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS?

1

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.

2

All persons are entitled to these rights and freedoms without distinction of age, race, color, sex, language, religion, or any other condition.

3

Everyone has the right to life, freedom, and security of person.

4

Slavery and servitude are prohibited in all their forms.

5

No one will be subjected to torture or cruel treatment of any kind.

6

Everyone has the right to recognition as a person before the law.

7

All are equal before the law and entitled to equal protection of the law.

8

Everyone has the right to protection against any violation of the rights granted to them by the constitution or laws.

9

Everyone has the right to an effective remedy before a competent national court when their fundamental rights are violated.

10

No one will be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention, or exile.

11

Everyone has the right to be heard publicly and by an independent and impartial court that examines any criminal charges.

12

Any person accused of a crime is innocent until proven guilty.

13

No one will be subjected to arbitrary interference with their privacy, family, home, or correspondence, and to have their honor and reputation protected from attacks. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

14

Everyone has the right to move freely and choose their residence within a state.

15

We have the right to seek asylum and accept it in any country.

2. WHICH RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS?

16

Everyone has the right to a nationality.

17

Men and women have the right to marry and found a family.

18

Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as with others.

19

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience, and religion. This includes the right to change one's belief or religion, and the freedom to practice their religion or beliefs in public or private.

20

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression.

21

Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly.

22

Everyone has the right to take part in the government of their country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.

23

All members of society have the right to social security and the corresponding economic, social, and cultural rights to develop our personality freely.

24

Everyone has the right to work and to just and favorable work conditions and protection against unemployment.

25

Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limits on working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

26

Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of themselves and their family, including food, clothing, housing, medical care, social services, security in case of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age, or other circumstances beyond their control.

27

Everyone has the right to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and share in scientific advancements and their benefits.

28

Everyone has the right to a social and international order in which their human rights can be fully realized.

29

Everyone has duties to their community in which alone the free and full development of their personality is possible.

30

Nothing in the aforementioned rights can be interpreted as implying for any State, group, or person any right to engage in any activity aimed at the destruction of the rights and freedoms set forth.

3. HOW DID HUMAN RIGHTS COME ABOUT?

Its adoption recognized that human rights are the basis of freedom, justice, and peace.

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted by the UN on December 10th, 1948 in response to the "acts of barbarity that were outrageosly committed to the conscience of mankind" during World War II.

The UDHR marked a milestone. For the first time, the world had a globally agreed upon document that stated that all human beings are free and equal regardless of their sex, race, beliefs, religion, or any other characteristics.

4. WHAT IS THEIR IMPORTANCE?

They are essentials elements in the life of any person, as they foster their development by guaranteeing them justice, freedom of religion, the right to live in a healthy environment, to live in an equal way, to live a healthy and safe life.

5. timeline

539 ac

1789

1215

1948

The Cyrus Cylinder

The Magna Carta

The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Known today as the Cyrus Cylinder, this ancient document has now been recognized as the first human rights document in the world.His following actions were those that marked a significant advance for mankind. He freed slaves, declared that all people had the right to choose their own religion, and established racial equality.

Just six weeks after the sudden attack on the Bastille, and just three weeks after the abolition of feudalism, the National Constituent Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizens as the first step in writing the Constitution of the Republic of France.

Widely regarded as one of the most important legal documents in the development of modern democracy, the Magna Carta was a crucial point of change in the struggle to establish freedom.

The Commission prepared to draft the document which became the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Roosevelt, to whom the inspiration for the document was attributed, referred to the Declaration as the International Magna Carta for All Humanity. It was adopted by the United Nations on December 10th, 1948.

Murders of defenders of human rights

6. DATA

321

In total, 106 countries have abolished the death penalty

106

Women's marches held around the world

+600

7. Sources

Amnesty International -(https://cutt.ly/fjPUHkV)OXFAM Intermón - (https://cutt.ly/NjPUOBw)Ayudan en Acción - (https://cutt.ly/HjPUVhl)Preceden - (https://cutt.ly/kjPU8DZ)

THANK YOU!