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WEB DU BOIS

Father os Social Science and of Pan-Africanism

HELPED...

He helped colonial victims, researching the army of World War I. Du Bois was also a feminist who supported the women's suffrage movement in the United States.

WHAT IS THE FOUNDER OF?

Du Bois was also one of the co-founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and he y he emerged as the leader of the Niagara Movement.

WHO WAS HE?

An agnostic advocate for racial equality for African Americans.

PIONEER OF...

After graduating from Harvard, making him the first African American to earn a doctorate.

WHERE DID HE TRAVEL?

Du Bois made several trips to Europe, Africa and Asia. His cause included people of color everywhere, particularly Asians and Africans in their struggle against colonialism and imperialism.

HE FIGHTED AGAINST...

Lynchings, educational discrimination, Jim Crow laws and the Atlanta Compromise, which involved racial inequality.

United States (1868-1963)

WEB DU BOIS, Father of Social Science and the Father of Pan-Africanism.A leading socio-political activist who argued for immediate racial equality for African Americans. He co-founded the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) and he has been called the Father of Social Science and the Father of Pan-Africanism.Originally from Massachusetts, Du Bois grew up in a tolerant community and experienced few instances of racism during his childhood. After graduating from Harvard, making him the first African American to earn a doctorate, he became a professor of history, sociology and economics at the University of Atlanta. Du Bois was also one of the co-founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).He achieved national prominence when he emerged as the leader of the Niagara Movement, a group of African American activists who sought equal rights for blacks. Du Bois and his supporters opposed Booker T. Washington's Atlanta Compromise, an agreement in which Black people in the South had to work submissively and yield to white political domination, while white people in the South guaranteed that Black people would receive basic educational and economic opportunities. Du Bois insisted on civil rights and increased political representation, which he believed should be driven by the African American intellectual elite, whom he called the talented tenth. Du Bois was not a religious man, he described himself as a freethinker or agnostic, who had little patience with the African American churches or clergy, because he felt they were holding back the path of progress.Racism and discrimination were frequent targets of Du Bois' controversies, and he protested loudly against lynchings, Jim Crow laws, and discrimination in education. Du Bois made several trips to Europe, Africa and Asia. After World War I, he surveyed black soldiers in France and documented widespread intolerance in the U.S. military. His cause included people of color everywhere, particularly Asians and Africans in their struggle against colonialism and imperialism. He was an advocate of pan-Africanism and helped organize several pan-African congresses to liberate African colonies from European powers. Du Bois was also a feminist who supported the women's suffrage movement in the United States.In order to deepen your understanding of how this man transformed part of his reality, here are some links where you can continue your research:https://www.biography.com/activist/web-du-boishttps://www.naacp.org/naacp-history-w-e-b-dubois/