Want to make creations as awesome as this one?

No description

Transcript

Cello

Violin

Viola

Trombone

Trumpet

Saxophone

Flute

Clarinet

Welcome!

Click on any instrument to hear what it sounds like and learn more!

Band

Orchestra

Turnsoundon!

Turnsoundon!

Flute

Band - Woodwind

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the flute!

Hover over this fluteto learn what the different parts are!

Foot Joint

Body

Head Joint

The flute originated in Central Asia and is thought, by most historians, to be one of the oldest musical instruments.

Some flutes were held in front of the player like a recorder would be. The first evidence of a transversal flute, a flute held horizontally, can be seen in artwork from as far back as 200BCE. Here you can see a selection of flutes from around the world.

At first, the flute only had tone holes, developing from two to seven. One key was added for the little finger, introduced on the baroque flute in the late 1600s.

Theobald Boehm completely redesigned the flute in 1847 to include a key system. The new system improved everything about the flute: intonation, tone, volume, and made it easier to play. The modern flute remains basically unchanged from this version.

Turnsoundon!

Turnsoundon!

Clarinet

Band - Woodwind

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the clarinet!

Hover over this clarinetto learn what the different parts are!

Bell

Lower Joint

Upper Joint

Barrel

Mouthpiece and Ligature

The clarinet is a descendant of the chalumeau(sha-loo-moh). It was a popular European instrument in the 1600s.

German instrument makers invented and began selling the clarinet in the early 1700s. The biggest improvment to the chalumeau was the addition of a register key, which made higher notes possible. The name "clarinet" is derived from Italian for "little trumpet".

Hyacinthe Klosé, a French clarinetist, adapted the Boehm flute system to the clarinet. Instrument maker Louis-Auguste Buffet built the new model.

Klosé and Buffet's clarinet model set the foundation for the modern clarinet. The fingerings have been further refined into the arrangement of holes and keys we have today on most modern clarinets.

Turnsoundon!

Turnsoundon!

Saxophone

Band - Woodwind

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the saxophone!

Hover over this saxophoneto learn what the different parts are!

Mouthpiece

Bell

Body

Neck

Mouthpiece and Ligature

Body

Aldolphe Sax invented the saxophone in 1841 and patented it in 1846 in Paris. The saxophone family was invented to bridge the woodwind and brass sections in an orchestra or band.

The saxophone never found a spot in orchestras and was generally not accepted as a legitimate instrument for much of its early life. It soon found a place in the wind band, and with the help of composer John Philip Sousa, had cemented its place in the band. The saxophone also became wildly popular in jazz music and is the music it is most well known for.

There were 14 original saxophone models. Of those, the Eb (E-flat) alto, the Bb (B-flat) tenor, and Eb baritone are most commonly used today. The Bb soprano is also common but mostly in jazz and small ensembles.

The saxophone has a brass body and wooden reed, which allows it to blend equally well with brass or woodwind instruments. The saxophone is called a woodwind because the key system is similar to that of the flute and uses a reed.

If you want to play the saxophone, make sure you check with your band director first! Most band directors will require you to play clarinet for one year before starting on the saxophone!

Turnsoundon!

Turnsoundon!

Trumpet

Band - Brass

Hover over this trumpetto learn what the different parts are!

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the trumpet!

Mouthpiece

Bell

Main Tuning Slide

Third Valve Slide and Finger Ring

First Valve Slide and Finger Saddle

First Valve

Second Valve

Third Valve

Receiver and Lead Pipe

Early on, the trumpet was a long, straight tube with no valves and was commonly used for signaling.

The trumpet is a very old instrument, it was first used in China in 2000 BCE, in Egypt in 1500 BCE, and in Scandinavia in 1000 BCE. These trumpets were nothing more than simple blow horns, made out of conch shells or animal horns.

The trumpet first began to resemble our modern trumpets in the 14th century when it was formed into a folded shape. Valves were first invented in 1815, which allowed the trumpet to play chromatically.

You may see your books and music say "Bb Trumpet/Cornet". This is because the cornet is an extremely similar instrument to the trumpet, the only difference being the conical shape of the cornet's tubing. The trumpet and cornet are almost always used interchangeably today in ensembles.

Turnsoundon!

Turnsoundon!

Trombone

Band - Brass

Hover over this tromboneto learn what the different parts are!

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the trombone!

Tuning Slide

Bell

Slide

Mouthpiece and Receiver

Bell

Tuning Slide

Tuning Slide

Counter-Weight

Bell Brace

The trombone we have today is basically unchanged from the instrument that was first seen in 1450.The trombone was a very useful instrument to composers at the time, as it was the only brass instrument that could play any note of a scale.

The trombone is the only modern instrument today that uses a slide. It has an ancestor called the tromba, which is a long trumpet used in the middle ages. It also had another English ancestor, a slide instrument called thesackbut.

The trombone was only played in town concert bands and in churches to accompany singers at first, but soon, operas and sacred works by great classical composers called for trombone. It became a regular member of the symphony orchestra by 1850.

In the 20th century, a valve attachment was introduced for the trombone, which allowed lower notes to be played with ease.

Turnsoundon!

Turnsoundon!

Violin

Orchestra - Strings

Hover over this violinto learn what the different parts are!

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the violin!

There are several different sizes of violins.

1/4

1/2

3/4

4/4

Upper Bout (or Shoulder)

Upper Bout (or Shoulder)

C Bout

C Bout

F Hole

F Hole

Tuning Pegs

Tuning Pegs

Scroll

Lower Bout

Lower Bout

Chin Rest

Tailpiece and Fine Tuners

Bridge

Neck and Finger Board

G String

D String

A String

E String

The first modern violin was built by the Amati family in Cremona, Italy during the mid-to-late 1500s. Below is an Amati violin, which is believed to have been built for the marriage of Phillip II of Spain in 1559. It is currently on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and is one of the earliest violins built.

The earliest string instruments, like the Greek lyre, were mostly plucked. String instruments that were bowed (like the violin) are thought to have originated in Central Asia and resemble the modern-day Mongolian Morin huur (seen below).

There are at least 70 parts that make up one violin! They're made of specially seasoned and aged woods, typically spruce and maple woods. In the 18th century, significant changes were made to the violin, like the length and angle of the neck, and adding a heavier bass bar.

Even though you have to replace strings and small parts from time to time, most violins, violas, and cellos can last forever if they're well cared for. Many greater quality instruments can actually improve over time. In fact, instruments from the "Golden Age" of violin making are incredibly sought-after. The current record amount paid for this Stradivari violin, built in 1721, is $15.9 Million!

Turnsoundon!

Turnsoundon!

Viola

Orchestra - Strings

11"

12"

13"

14"+

There are several different sizes of violas.

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the viola!

Hover over this violato learn what the different parts are!

Upper Bout (or Shoulder)

Upper Bout (or Shoulder)

C Bout

C Bout

F Hole

F Hole

Lower Bout

Lower Bout

Chin Rest

Tailpiece and Fine Tuners

Neck and Finger Board

Tuning Pegs

Tuning Pegs

Scroll

Bridge

C String

G String

D String

A String

There are at least 70 parts that make up one viola! They're made of specially seasoned and aged woods, typically spruce and maple woods. During the late 1700s, string instrument makers discoverd ways to string instruments with higher tension.

The first violas were built by the Amati family in the Cremona region of Italy at the turn of the 16th century. It is debated whether the violin or viola came first, though many historians believe the viola predates the violin due to the structure of the word and the names of other string instruments.

Even though you have to replace strings and small parts from time to time, most violins, violas, and cellos can last forever if they're well cared for. Many greater quality instruments can actually improve over time! In fact, a Stradivari viola known as "The Macdonald", crafted in 1719 (shown below), was given an asking price of $45 Million in 2014!

The earliest string instruments, like the Greek lyre, were mostly plucked. String instruments that were bowed (like the viola) are thought to have originated in Central Asia and resemble the modern-day Mongolian Morin huur (seen below).

Turn sound on!

Turnsoundon!

Cello

Orchestra - Strings

1/4

1/2

3/4

4/4

Hover over this celloto learn what the different parts are!

There are several different sizes of cellos.

Click the orange buttons to learn some history of the cello!

Upper Bout (or Shoulder)

Upper Bout (or Shoulder)

C Bout

C Bout

F Hole

F Hole

Bridge

Tailpiece and Fine Tuners

Lower Bout

Lower Bout

Endpin and Endpin Screw

Scroll

Tuning Pegs

Tuning Pegs

Neck and Finger Board

C String

G String

D String

A String

The first modern cello was built by the Amati family in Cremona, Italy during the mid-to-late 1500s. It was originally referred to as the "bass violin" and was called the viola de braccio in Italy. The cello below is the Amati "King" cello and is the world's earliest known cello.

Antonio Stradivari is credited for determining the standard size of the cello. After 1710, he also made different sizes of the cello between the two original sizes of cello (one was too small, the other too large). Soon, many other cello makers adapted this size, making it the standard.

The earliest string instruments, like the Greek lyre, were mostly plucked. String instruments that were bowed (like the cello) are thought to have originated in Central Asia and resemble the modern-day Mongolian Morin huur (seen below).

String instrument makers continued to make changes and innovate on the cello, even still today. A well made cello can last a very long time when it is taken care of. Greater quality cellos can even improve over time! In fact, the Paganini Stradavarius cello, built in 1707 (shown below), recently sold for over $6 Million!