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How can I use digital tools toflip learning?

Meet Anaru, a year 9/10 teacher looking for ways to use digital tools to help flip learning, so that students can access their learning anywhere, anyhow, anytime.

Why would I do this?

What tools would I use?

How would I do this?

Making connections

In a flipped learning setting, teachers make lessons available to students to be accessed whenever and wherever it is convenient on digital devices, allowing for more personalised learning. Teachers can deliver this instruction by recording and narrating screencasts of work they do on their computers, creating videos of themselves teaching, or curating video lessons from trusted Internet sites.

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e-Learning pedagogy

Flipped learning

Watch this video on,The flipped learning model – Purpose and pedagogy at Ashhurst School

How would I do this?

What tools would I use?

Makingconnections

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TRADITIONAL CLASSROOMIn the traditional classroom, the teacher delivers new learning to the students face-to-face. Students listen, interact, take notes, and then consolidate new knowledge during homework or followup tasks.FLIPPED CLASSROOMIn the flipped classroom, students do the basic learning prior to working with the teacher and then cover the applied learning and any problems in class.Students access a teacher-created website and/or watch teacher-created/sourced videos on their devices. They are able to stop and rewind the information as often as they need until they understand the concept.

Ashhurst School Principal, Heath Chittenden speaks about the flipped learning global standards project and how they have created a standard so that flipped learning looks the same no matter where in the world you are based.

Watch this webinar recording on, Distance learning for dummies

Watch this webinar recording of an informal Q&A with Heath Chittenden (Ashhurst School)where Heath sharesideas, processes, tips and tricks for creating digital content to support learners online.

Watch this video on, Planning a flipped session

Teachers, Sara and Emma, explain how they plan their lessons for a flipped classroom including how they make their instructional videos.

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e-Learning tools

QuicktimeExplain Everything appYoutubeVimeoPlaypositGoogle siteSeesawInformation websites

Join Enabling e-Learning community (VLN) and tell us what you think.

How would I do this?

Why would I do this?

Makingconnections

Watch & READ

Teachers, Sara and Emma, explain how they plan their lessons for a flipped classroom including how they make their instructional videos.

Watch this webinar recording of an informal Q&A with Heath Chittenden (Ashhurst School)where Heath sharesideas, processes, tips and tricks for creating digital content to support learners online.

Teachers, Sara and Emma, explain how they plan their lessons for a flipped classroom including how they make their instructional videos.

Watch this video on, Setting up and establishing the flipped approach at Ashhurst School

Teachers can source instructional videos from the Internet; such as Teacher Tube, Khan AcademyTeachers can create digital content by recording themselves, capturing content online (screencapture) using tools like Quicktime, Explain EverythingContent is stored digitally for students to access online using platforms like Google Sites or e-Portfolios like SeesawStudents engage with the content, rewind as neededTeachers provide further support and to help students apply their learning.

Possible strategy

Students do the basic learning prior to working with the teacher, then cover the applied learning and any problems in class.Students access teacher-created or sourced content on their devices. They are able to stop and rewind the information as often as they need to and have more control over their learning.Learning becomes more personalised and class time is freed up for:• student-centred learning activities• inquiry-based learning• project-based learning• collaborative work• teacher-assisted learning.

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What tools would I use?

Why would I do this?

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Teachers prepare, source or create content that is presented to students prior to engaging with the teacher to clarify, strengthen or deepen learning.

Principal, Heath Chittenden explains how they got teachers and parents prepared before rolling out flipped learning in their school. “Flipped learning is really important to be a school-wide focus because it actually is a pedagogical change to how you approach teaching.”

Making connections

Flipped Learning is a global pedagogicalmovement that enables students to accessinstruction anytime, anywhere on their digital devices.Technology is a catalyst for this shift or trend towards the Changing role of teachers,which is marked by a move from a “one- size- fits-all” approach of delivering and receiving knowledge, to an approach that honours the individual and their diversity (CORE Ten Trends 2019 PDF, p22).

Ministry funded National PLD priority

Digital Fluency

How would I do this?

What tools would I use?

Why would I do this?

Learning teaching - EmpoweringI regularly review the way I use digital technologies so that it is inclusive of all learners.

Links to Enabling e-Learning Framework

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Watch this video on, Flipped learning: Changes to teacher practice

In this video, teachers, Sara and Emma, talk about the biggest changes they have seen in their teaching since they started using flipped learning. “I think for me the biggest changes that it’s had are it’s more individually centred and it’s changed my position within the classroom.”

In this video, teachers, Sara and Emma, talk about the biggest changes they have seen in their teaching since they started using flipped learning. “I think for me the biggest changes that it’s had are it’s more individually centred and it’s changed my position within the classroom.”

In this video, Michael Fullan describes the flipped classroom. Teachers become activators or change agents, students become partners in learning, and technology fuels communication and collaboration.