Want to make creations as awesome as this one?

More creations to inspire you

Transcript



What?

Aims?

How?

Output?

Stated IOs

Who?

LOcal Linguistic Landscapes for global language education in the school context

Principal Coordinator: University of Hamburg (Dr. Silvia Melo-Pfeiffer)
Local Coordinator UAB: Dr. Melinda Dooly
Deputy Coordinator UAB: Dr. Emilee Moore

timeline of events

2019-1-DE03-KA201-060024

Directorate General for Education and Culture, Erasmus+ 2019 Key Action 2 Strategic Partnerships for Higher Education

This project: i) commits to acknowledging the added-value of superdiversity in language education, by mapping local Linguistic Landscapes (LL) and discussing them comparatively at an international level; ii) acknowledges the importance of involving youth, namely with migrant background, in active discovery and dissemination processes related to social and lived multilingualism and to their own linguistic repertoires.; iii) connects foreign language learning and language awareness through sociolinguistics discussions on language presence, roles and dynamics in broader social contexts, acknowledging languages and the linguistic resources that young people have at their disposal.


Students and teachers will learn to understand and become aware of language hierarchies and linguistic prestige, language comparison and language awareness, translanguaging in public spaces) and develop multilingual, critical and plurisemiotic literacies and, concomitantly, the development of skills in the languages of the school and the development of the linguistic repertoires.


Materials will help foster global language education, promote commitment to linguistic diversity and lifelong learning by bringing students’ lifeworld and school multilingualism to the foreground so that they can develop a sense of belonging through active participation in multilingual and intercultural spaces.


Help adolescents develop self-esteem and agency when actively engaged in meaningful interactions and discovery processes through their engagement as oo-ethnographers of their language milieus.

  • Tool kit including practical resources for teachers and students: a collection of (multimodal) modules to be used by teachers, a library with pod-casts and tutorials on the usage of those resources and an App to be used by students
  • Guidelines to different stakeholders (teacher educators, teachers, students, ...), including an international, comparative and comprehensive state of the art about the integration of multilingual
  • Resources in the classrooms, the added-valued of using the designed materials and of collaboration (both local and international) in integrating multilingualism in the classroom;


We will co-produce videos of "linguistic landscapes" (and also "schoolscaping" and "homescaping") that underscore the presence of various languages and linguistic resources.

Students and teachers will learn to understand and become aware of language hierarchies and linguistic prestige, language comparison and language awareness, translanguaging in public spaces) and develop multilingual, critical and plurisemiotic literacies and, concomitantly, the development of skills in the languages of the school and the development of the linguistic repertoires.

LoCALL’s principles and aims will be realised through the sequential but interrelated conception of these intellectual outputs: creation of 1) (multimodal) modules on linguistic landscaping (LL) for language education in the different contexts, aimed at teachers and teacher trainers; 2) Tutorial and podcast library on LL; 3) App for mobile learning, including several functions; and 4) Guidelines for the introduction of linguistic landscapes in (foreign) language learning and teacher education. All these IOs will be available on the project platform, which will include tools for telecollaboration across schools and partners (synchronous and asynchronous communication tools).

LOCALL: Local Linguistic Landscapes for global language education in the school context

2019-1-DE03-KA201-060024

Directorate General for Education and Culture

UAB team: Melinda Ann Dooly (local manager), Emilee Moore (deputy manager), Dolors Masats, Maria Mont, Claudia Vallejo; Mònica López, Paula Bito (school artist), Nuria Ribalta Vives and Klaudia Kruszynska

UAB Events (i)

First UAB team meeting

Introductions and general outline of the project is discussed. Two teachers volunteer to design and implement LL in their schools: (Mònica López, primary education - 6th graders) and Klaudia Kryszynska (secondary education - 9th graders). Maria Mont and *Aina Obiols (both from primary education agree to contribute to designing of projects).


Dolors Masats, Claudia Vallejo & **Emilee Moore cannot attend the meeting.


*Aina later informs Melinda that she cannot participate in the project.

** On maternity leave.

LL Planning (with new team member: school artist, Paula Bito & soon-to-be mom Maria!)

Brainstorming session with school artist (Paula Bito) who works closely with Mònica in the school. Initial ideas on how to bring LL into the classes. Maria - who is on leave - joined us in the meeting.


Unable to attend: Dolors Masats, *Emilee Moore & Claudia Vallejo


*On maternity leave

First drafts completed

28/12/19

22/01/20

13/02/20

01/03/20

30/04/20

14/05/20

Linguistic landscape workshop

Online Meeting: Dealing with the Covid 19 Crisis. New planning for the current situation.

Notes: Online meeting 30 April 2020


Melinda Dooly, Mònica López, Klaudia Kruszynska


Prior to the meeting, we all watched the materials (Coronascapes) sent by the Groningen partners.


Point 1: Round: What are you doing in your schools right now? How are you adapting? Can we still fit anything sort of LL into the lessons before the end of the school year?


Mònica (primary): Classes in googleclassroom. Assigns 1 activity per week, per subject. 2 group tutorials of approximately an hour per week.

Klaudia (middle school): Students have 'regular' schedule (daily 9 to 5 classes). Students are overwhelmed and it is really not functioning very well.


Can we go ahead with any activities?

Mònica: Thinks she can do something but it must be much simpler, less ambitious.

Klaudia: Will have to switch from 3rd grade in secondary school to 4th grade secondary school students (has a tutorial/homeroom with these students; much smaller group; has at least 4-5 hours with them per week in smaller group).


Point 2: If we think we can go ahead, what can we do (2 hour brainstorming session)


Decisions taken:

Mònica (primary third cycle, year 5 and 6)

1) Initial activity of 'linguistic scavenger hunt'. Students have to create a collage of the different examples of languages that they can find in their houses. She will do an example first. She will pose it as a 'challenge' (who can find the most languages in their immediate environment?).

  • Question of images is an issue (there wasn't enough time to ask for permission to collect images before Spain went into lock-down). She will ask them to do the collage without an self-images or else ask for permission from parents in a digital permission form.

2) Students will share their collages in the online tutorial and discuss the languages.

3) Students will be asked to post words and phrases they know in other languages on a collage (e.g. EU background).

4) Based on this she will discuss whether languages 'belong' to specific places and then get them to critically reflect on their answers by showing them the picture she had originally intended to start the project with (multilingual sign from a hairdresser's shop).

5) OPTIONAL activity - students will be asked to do LL during their 1 hour 'outside time'. This has to be optional because it is the only time the students have to be outside and she can't force them to do work during that time.


Klaudia (4ESO – last year of secondary obligatory education, 15-16 years old):

1) Students will be shown a self-portrait linguistic biography Power Point slide (Klaudia will do her own to inspire them) and asked to do their own. They should not give their names. They will also prepare a recording describing their own slide.

2) These will be added to a presentation and during the tutorials they have to try to guess whose drawing belongs to whom. Next, they will listen to student´s recording. They will have time to discuss their slides.

3) In small groups, the students will be asked to write a poem, using the languages that are represented in their groups.

4) They create a 'performance art' from the poem (adding music, imagery, narrative, etc.).

5) Discussion of which of these languages are visible/invisible in the community and why.

6) Carry out a sociolinguistic study (with another teacher) on the languages they have as a class and minority languages represented in the 4 Catalan provinces, one province per group of 4-5 students.

Meeting & presentation of output 'Coronascapes'

Notes: Online meeting 14 May 2020

Participants: Melinda Dooly, Mònica López, Klaudia Kruszynska


Point 1: Round: How are the linguistic homescapes going?

Mònica (primary): Students have engaged quite enthusiastically. She has already

collected some videos (based on her modelling) and will ask them to do cityscapes

during their 'outside time'.


Klaudia (secondary): Students have done their first linguistic self-collages. They are

discussing them a few at a time during this week (guessing who is who). She finds she is having a hard time getting the students motivated and is a bit worried that they are going to get bored with the activity before they finish. Klaudia shared the students' 1st output of narrated presentation slides (see illustration below for examples).




Point 2: What to do next? What points do we bring out? (Brainstorming and decisions taken)


Mònica (primary third cycle, year 5 and 6)

Some of the students are struggling with all of the studies so will make it all optional.

Following the cityscape, we have designed a survey:

  • Which language were you most surprised to see /like the most that is present in your or your mates' lives?
  • Which language(s) are most predominant in the city? Why do you think this is so? Which languages are more 'invisible'? Why?
  • What did you learn?
  • What would you do differently?


Mònica will do a 'percentage' infochart of language presence and ask the students to

choose a 'new' language to 'explore' (learn a word, phrase). They will then create an

'digital mural' with images and audio files.


Klaudia (secondary 3r ESO)

  • Will hold a discussion on why there is a predominant use of flags to represent languages.
  • Students will create their 'performance art' but she is not sure if they will have time/energy to do the sociolinguistic research project.


Point 3: Set up next online meeting to continue discussion and talk about June training.

More Events

Return

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

E1 UNIVERSIDADE DE AVEIRO Jornadas do LALE 10-2021
E2 UNIVERSITAET HAMBURG Tagung LI 06-2022
E3 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Groningen 09-2021
E4 UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA Barcelona 11-2021
E5 UNIVERSITE DE STRASBOURG Strasbourg 10-2021


The UAB team will offer a day and half dissemination event that will consist of talks that showcase
the main aims and outcomes of the project on the first half day. This opening session will be held on a Friday afternoon in order to ensure maximum availability to secondary and primary education
teachers (the main target audience) but will also be open to other educational stakeholders such as teacher educators and principal policy makers (local, regional and national administrators in
departments of education and similar). The second day will be a full day of workshops for teachers
and educators interested in learning about using the approach developed by the project in their own teaching practice.

UAB Events (ii)

3rd online meeting
More discussion; presentation of mid-project output

Notes: Online meeting 29 May 2020



Participants: Melinda Dooly, Mònica López, Klaudia Kruszynska


Point 1: Round: How are the coronascapes going?


Mònica (primary): Students are very engaged. She has collected over 60 videos! There are fewer cityscapes and most of them only show Catalan and Spanish (and a bit of English. The 'Italian' Pizza shows up on several of them). This could be due to the limit in kilometers that they can leave their homes or the fact that there are actually few languages visible in the town where they live. Mònica shared the powerpoint she had used to motivate them to find languages in their home (see image below).


Mònica is working on the survey and setting up guidelines to help the students analyze somewhat the findings of the 'discovered' languages' in order to lead into some reflection. She hopes to get them to produce a collaborative research and will present us with the outcome soon.


Klaudia (secondary): Students became more excited about the powerpoint presentations as the sessions went on. She had been worried that they would not enjoy going through all of them but found that the students actually requested it! The students are now working on their 'performance' videos (very much looking forward to seeing those results). The performance videos will be based on the languages that the small collaborative groups have (they should teach other their unique languages).


The discussion on connection people make between languages and nation-state symbols was very interesting. Klaudia has taken notes on some of the main points because she was not allowed to record the sessions.




Point 2: Finalizing the projects

Both teachers agree that it is getting more complicated as the term ends. The students are tired and a bit fed up with the 'online schooling'. The warm weather and lifting of some of the confinement restrictions is also making it more difficult for the students to stay focused. Both teachers agreed that they will try to bring the projects to a meaningful end but will not force the issue.


Point 3: Discussion of the June training.

  • Decided to invite the collaborating teachers from each school.
  • Made a list of potential other candidates who might be interested in joining the training.
  • Agreed that Melinda will send out the invitations and the link.


Point 4: Next meeting.

Decided to set a provisional date of Wednesday 3rd for another meeting - but only if needed regarding questions or doubts about the online training set for the following week.

28/05/20

09/06/20

10/06/20

19/06/20

06/07/20

16/10/20

Participation in the first days of our online teacher training programme

The first days of our online teacher training event, run by our Groningen partners, have come and gone. A fantastic start - lots of participation and we are sharing our work and discussing new ideas with others. A very nice discussion this evening about LL. The only downside is that we couldn't actually be in Groningen this June!


Here are a few of the key words that have emerged from this first discussion:


UAB team members enrolled in the training: Melinda Dooly, Mònica López & Klaudia Kruszynska. Other GREIP associates enrolled in the training: Johanna Buitrago & Jiabi Wu.

Attending webinar:
Dr. Danielle Moore
Dr. Alice Chik
Dr. Larissa Aronin

Very interesting talks by 3 wonderful speakers.

Summaries of the talks are available in page five (project events) of this timeline.


Our first speaker was Dr. Danielle Moore, followed by Dr. Alice Chik.

And last but not least, we had a talk by Dr. Larissa Aronin.


UAB Team attendees: Melinda Dooly, Mònica López, Claudia Vallejo

Other invited UAB attendees: Ania Czura, Johana Buitrago, Jiabi Wu

Consortium meeting

Online consortium meeting: 19 June 2020 (UAB Notes)

  • App - have contacted software companies; have chosen one that has done educational apps
  • Margarida presented app










  • Look at http://languagelandscape.org/
  • Training week goes into IO2 (modules)














Some issues raised: What about sustainability? If it is only the cities that are in the consortium it won't be open later for other teachers from other countries & cities? How about making it satellite-functional (googlemap)? Can it be open to other schools? We need to include the wider metropolitan area of the cities otherwise the teachers have to take fieldtrips (e.g. to Barcelona)


  • Online training module: All agree that it was a great success
  • Website will be launched in a few days
  • Interim report is almost done; mostly a qualitative report - progress check
  • IO2: Modules:
    • Questions: Will schools be open next year? How are we going to launch this? How will we implement these activities? Do we postpone them? Were planning to record the teacher training students to do think aloud protocol - but will this be possible? Can we do research around this?
    • Modules will be published online as resources - but need to have more homogenous appearance; have had at least one teacher already testing this
    • Need a content structure for the modules (website & publications): Suggestion to have them published here https://www.ua.pt/cidtff/lale/page/24138
    • UAB team can publish their coronascapes by adapting to the format which Silvia will send us.
  • IO5: Silvia is collecting information from training to add to the guidelines
  • IO3 (UAB):



  • 18-22 January - 1st training week
  • Discussion & decisions regarding IO3:
    • Tutorials are 'how-to' aimed at teachers regarding LL.

§ UAB will collect 'key questions' from teachers from online training modules & from teams. After sorting them, we will distribute them to be answered by different teams. UAB is in charge of creating guidelines regarding the format of the tutorials.

  • Podcasts: vignettes of experiences. Agreed to also include vlogcasts. We also have to come up with guidelines of format. Can use some of the pilot experiences to create some samples now.
  • Next international training: 18-22 (Aveiro)
  • Transnational meeting - set for 21st & 22nd

UAB team meeting

Notes: Online meeting 6 July 2020

Participants: Melinda Dooly, Mònica López, Klaudia Kruszynska, Claudia Vallejo


Point 1: Impressions from online training week.

Both Klaudia & Mònica enjoyed it. It was a very busy week for them and they were unable to attend everything. Klaudia couldn't access the online seminars but downloaded them and watched them later. Found them very useful. Mònica enjoyed the break out discussion and felt that everything was very well organized.

(Claudia had to leave early to take her children to an event). She promised to post the meeting on the GREIP newsite.


Point 2: Possibility to publish their pilot materials.

Melinda explained the possibility of publishing in Cadernos do LALE and shared the link and example sent by Aveiro. Klaudia is interested in getting started on something over the summer. Mònica is unable to do so during the summer but will look into it in September.

Point 3. Upcoming dates of events.

Melinda will share updated timeline with all the UAB participants. She confirmed that the training in Aveiro has been moved from September 2020 to January 2021.


Point 4: Getting to work on IO3.

Melinda explained what we are expected to do. The UAB team examined the new LOCALL webpage. We are unsure of the difference between the vignettes and the 'videos' (one is already online).

We discussed the formats for both. Melinda insisted on getting their input as teachers 'think like a teacher - what would be useful for you'. This focus helped us decide length of the materials and formats.

We started an online google document for brainstorming questions. We are hoping to receive more from the participants' survey from the online training.

We came up with a general outline for both the tutorials and the vignettes.

Klaudia will create a pilot vignette over the summer. Mònica will try to do one in September.

General outline to be submitted to other partners for discussion:

Tutorial structure: We discussed what would be most appealing and useful for teachers. Opted for video over text due to time issues (quick and handy).

Suggested format: Video of speaker embedded in a presentation (preferable - always nice to have a personal touch) or narrated presentation.

Suggested outline

Opening sequence: LOCALL logo + question (in text)

2 to 3 minute video (Read question then give answer).





Recommendations:

  • Keep question short and to the point. If the question is too complex make it into 2 or 3 questions. If you have to do this, make reference to the next question at the end of the video. ‘If you want to know about … see video XXXX’.
  • Avoid technical/academic language; talk as if addressing students.
  • Give an example if possible (especially using students’ work - make sure you have permission first).
  • Make the video as visual as possible
  • Finish with author name & school & university partner, LOCALL logo & webpage url
  • Date

Vignettes: 5 to 7 minutes

  • Provide a title & LOCALL logo (e.g. Making invisible languages invisible visible in the classroom)
  • Personal introduction (name) & contextualization (secondary school teacher; student level, ages, focus of the LL; other information - 1st time doing LL, experienced at LL, etc.)
  • Explanation of content focus of LL
  • Choose between whole project overview / just one activity from the overview
  • Make reference between the 2 (this is an overview of all the activities we did; to see the individual activities to go video XXX …).
  • Be concise. If it was a complex project break it down into more than one vignette
  • Finish with author name & school & university partner, LOCALL logo & webpage url
  • Date


Point 5. Melinda shared the following documents:

  • Shared folder
  • Updated timeline of events (need to request this from Sílvia).
  • LOCALL logo (in shared folder).
  • UAB timeline webpage.
  • LOCALL webpage.
  • Proposed APP powerpoint (link to dropbox)


Point 6. Next meeting
We did not set a date for our next meeting. Melinda promised to leave them alone until September! (She and Klaudia will still meet in July to talk about the pilot).


We said good-bye for the summer!


More EVENTS

Mònica presents her work internationally

Monica had the chance to present her work from this project internationally as an invited guest speaker for the online Erasmus Day celebration hosted by our Aveiro consortium partners. You can find out more information about the event here for go directly to the online presentations (Monica's presentation begins at -1:27:23).

previous

Homepage

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

E1 UNIVERSIDADE DE AVEIRO Jornadas do LALE 10-2021
E2 UNIVERSITAET HAMBURG Tagung LI 06-2022
E3 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Groningen 09-2021
E4 UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA Barcelona 11-2021
E5 UNIVERSITE DE STRASBOURG Strasbourg 10-2021


The UAB team will offer a day and half dissemination event that will consist of talks that showcase
the main aims and outcomes of the project on the first half day. This opening session will be held on a Friday afternoon in order to ensure maximum availability to secondary and primary education
teachers (the main target audience) but will also be open to other educational stakeholders such as teacher educators and principal policy makers (local, regional and national administrators in
departments of education and similar). The second day will be a full day of workshops for teachers
and educators interested in learning about using the approach developed by the project in their own teaching practice.

UAB Events (iii)

Mònica gives a talk to preservice teachers from Spain & USA

Mònica shared her linguistic landscape project with preservice teachers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. Both classes are working telecollaboratively on the topic of technology-infused language teaching and this week the topic of discussion was linguistic landscaping. The students were impressed with Mònica's project as is evidenced by their quick round of impressions.



26/10/20

27/10/20

13/11/20

08/12/20

18/01/21

28/01/21

Klaudia gives a talk to preservice teachers from Spain & USA


Secondary teacher Klaudia Kruszynska was invited to talk to inservice teachers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign (USA) as the second part of a week-long seminar on linguistic landscaping. Here's her recorded talk.



Online consortium meeting


Online Surveys completed

UAB team has created a plurilingual survey for practicing teachers. The aim is to gather key questions and issues that teachers would like answered for the online tutorials (IO3). From these we'll create our short podcasts. We hope we'll get lots of responses!


Loading…

Online Training

LoCALL: Online Training Week

18-22 January 2021| Held in Google Classroom and Zoom

Hosted by Aveiro Team


Between the 18th and 22nd January 2021, the second online training week of the LoCALL project was held.

The training week was organized by the University of Aveiro’s project team and included webinars, virtual visits to museums, games, video and postcard creation, and exploration and experimentation of the new mobile app. At the end of the week there was an online social event.

The aims of this training week were:

  • To reflect and discuss about the concept of Linguistic Landscapes (LL) and its integration into teaching practices.
  • To promote awareness of language presence, roles and dynamics in the community.
  • To develop knowledge about the educational added value of mapping local LL, namely using the LoCALL app.

The target audience of this training week were university teachers, schoolteachers, researchers, master and PhD students and all of those interested in the topic.


For more information about training and multiplier events in this timeline, go here.

MoRE EVENTS

Online consortium meeting


On-line team meeting

January 28th 2021

11 a.m. (GMT +1)


1. Agenda presented

2. Synthesis of the discussion

2.1 Attending:

  • Aveiro: Mónica Lourenço (coord.), Ana Isabel Andrade, Maria Helena de Araújo e Sá, Filomena Martins, Margarida Marques, Ana Raquel Simões;
  • Barcelona: Melinda Dooly (coord.);
  • Groningen: Sibrecht Veenstra (Joana Duarte – excused);
  • Hamburg: Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer (coord.), Lisa Maria Brinkmann, Susann Fischer, Sarah McMonagle
  • Strasbourg: Andrea Young (coord.), Latisha Mary, Maria Siemushyna


2.2 Second training week (Jan, 2021): a preliminary balance

Ana Raquel Simões outlined the aims, the structure and the tasks of the training week, the demographics of the attendees (above 60), and the lessons learnt. She also provided a list of “lessons learnt” that could guide the preparation of the next training week, to be prepared by the Strasbourg team.

Mónica Lourenço presented preliminary data from the questionnaire feedback from the participants (questionnaire available in Portuguese and English). First feedback was overwhelming positive and encouraging.

It was very favorable commented on the performance of the Aveiro team, the collaborative work among its members, and the very well coordinated event. Also positively praised was the introduction of the App (IO4) in the tasks of the training week, allowing a validation of the structure and the gathering of information about its functioning. It was suggested to do the same in the upcoming training week, related to the testing and dissemination of IO3 (Podcasts and tutorials).

2.3 Development of IO2 (Modules)

Sibrecht Veenstra presented the results of the internal brainstorming in Groningen about the structure and the dissemination of the Modules. In the field of teaching materials, three main areas of development were proposed: language specific modules, language across subject modules, and content language learning modules. She presented different elements that could structure either a data bank with the materials or the creation of a template (such as age, title, aims of the module, etc). Each team should create between 2 and 3 modules, which will be translated afterwards. The upload of the modules in the platform should allow users to provide feedback.

The mechanisms of quality assurance of the modules were discussed, mainly if external participants want to see their materials published in the website. Each partner university will work as a first instance of quality control regarding the materials being proposed by their students.

2.4 Development of IO3 (Podcasts and Tutorials)

A definition of what are the functions of the two elements was provided by Melinda Dooly. Tutorials will have the function of providing tips to teachers / teacher trainees interested in implementing LL in their programs (and will be multimodal); podcasts will be used to disseminate practical experiences about working with LL (and might be sound files). Tutorials should have duration between 4 and 5 minutes; podcasts could go to 12 to 15 minutes. It was suggested that Tutorials should include subtitles in another language, and that those tutorials could include visual and written clues to facilitate understanding. Andrea suggested that kids should be involved in the production of the tutorials and podcasts.


A template for the creation of both formats will be shared in the beginning of February by Melinda. In the meanwhile, the whole team could reflect about questions that could be addressed in the tutorials. Such questions will be distributed among the participants and each team will be responsible for creating some podcasts and tutorials, following the templates.

2.5 Development of IO4 (App)

Mónica Lourenço presented the state of development of the App. App translation and implementation is almost done and the current phase relates to “testing and content development”. Because the App was integrated in the training week (a beta version), test and content development is also advancing well. The creation of a word-template that make the structure of the App and the games clearer was praised: it might help teachers and students to work on a concept before creating the game in the Dashboard. The inclusion of multimodal resources to cover the complexity of linguistic landscapes (that could be apprehended through photos, videos or sound files) is being developed.

Mónica also explained that three tutorials were created to guide users (both teachers and students) through the use of the App: one on how to register in the dashboard for games creation, another on how to create a LL path in the dashboard, and another on how to install the LoCALL app and how to play the available games. The three tutorials are available in the Project channel in the YouTube, to be disseminated to a larger audience.

The Aveiro team is thinking of creating Guidelines to pedagogically guide teachers and students in the use of the App. These guidelines, which will focus on the use and integration of the App in the classroom, across different school subjects, are supposed to be developed collaboratively with developers, teachers and students, including also the presentation of case studies. The Guidelines might be translated into all languages of the project.


Mónica asked the team to send her until the 12th of February information on the names and emails of the team members who will have coordinator accounts in the dashboard, the names of the schools they are working with, and to finalise the translation of the two documents that were previously sent via email (“LoCALL App translation” and “LoCALL platform translation”).


2.6 Third training week (around June 2021), according to the application

Strasbourg presented a possible date for the training week and it was established that the third training week will take place between the 28th June and the 2nd July 2021. Because of travel restrictions, the training week will take place on-line, even if integrating “outside” resources from different participants’ locations.

Latisha and Maria presented the preliminary ideas for structuring the training week that will look for the direct engagement of students, teachers and schools working in the scope of the project.


2.7 Administration

Silvia recalled the need to complete and send the timesheets of the project, in order to keep trace of the working days, predict the second report (due to the 30th June 2021), and ask the second 40% installment (that can only be paid if 70% of the time and resources are already engaged). She added that all bilateral contracts are now sent to the administration and the University of Hamburg should be preparing the installments to all the partners.

Regarding the website, she made a call to contribute to the feeding of the project with new content, namely by involving teachers, scholars, and graduate students in the production of content. Mónica referred that those texts get a bit lost in the website and should be made more visible, either by tagging them or by creating a new tab on “LL around the world”. Another tab to be created relates to “Conferences and publications” of the team.

Homepage

Previous

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

E1 UNIVERSIDADE DE AVEIRO Jornadas do LALE 10-2021
E2 UNIVERSITAET HAMBURG Tagung LI 06-2022
E3 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Groningen 09-2021
E4 UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA Barcelona 11-2021
E5 UNIVERSITE DE STRASBOURG Strasbourg 10-2021


The UAB team will offer a day and half dissemination event that will consist of talks that showcase
the main aims and outcomes of the project on the first half day. This opening session will be held on a Friday afternoon in order to ensure maximum availability to secondary and primary education
teachers (the main target audience) but will also be open to other educational stakeholders such as teacher educators and principal policy makers (local, regional and national administrators in
departments of education and similar). The second day will be a full day of workshops for teachers
and educators interested in learning about using the approach developed by the project in their own teaching practice.

UAB Events (iv)

Local LoCALL meeting

Participants:

Melinda, Mónica, Klaudia, Maria


1. Discussion of IO3

Following the piloting of the IO3 tutorial (made by Klaudia) and after the international consortium meeting, it was decided that the template needs some changes.

  • Needs to promote more dynamic production.
  • Cover wider range of questions
  • Need for a more complete template


Decisions made:

For tutorials:

  • Instead of a powerpoint, we will provide a story board with written instructions (Melinda will take care of this).
  • We will try to pull together another example to share with everyone along with the template.
  • We will maintain the first and last text/image openings and closings (LOCALL image, information)
  • The storyboard should begin with the driving question. If possible a sub-title (but not compulsory). E.g. What if the languages in the linguistic landscape are too difficult for my students? Scaffolding learner understanding in LL
  • 5 minutes maximum (but ideally 3-4).
  • Can be in any language but must include sub-titling in English.
  • We will provide 'cues' and tips in the storyboard suggestion:
    • Use questions in the narrative as a topic change or lead-in (e.g. And what if my students still do not understand? ... then provide answer)
    • To ensure that the tutorials are dynamic, the creator should not spend more than 15 to 20 seconds per image.
    • The narrative should be accompanied with ample imagery (examples of output, iconic representation of the text, etc.). If text is used it should be short.
    • Oral narrative should be accompanied by text or imagery as much as possible.
    • Audio (voice over) should be modulated and audible. The volume should be sufficient to distinguish what is being said but not overly loud.
    • Oral narrative should be simple and short but not choppy.
    • We suggest using (the same) music for the beginning and end of the tutorials. Maria will look for samples (creative commons). The music can also be used in moments of images only but should be faded out as voice over comes in.
  • Technical issues that need to be resolved:
    • Do the tutorials need to be recorded in a specific format (requisites for the website?)
    • Should we all use the same video editing tool or do we just recommend some? (viddyoze, iMovie, Animoto, Pinnacle, etc.)


Other related issues:

  • No one has posed any questions in the survey we designed. Hopefully once we have another pilot made others will be inspired to test the template. We will try to brainstorm more questions but will also ask each partner to propose minimally 3.



Podcasts:

Decisions made:

  • These will be focused on highlighting experiences. We discussed the material we have and have decided to create 2 pilots to test the template:
  • Monica will interview some of her students and use their recording for the pilot.
  • Klaudia will select fragments from her recorded information (shared with Melinda)
  • Other potential sources: Klaudia's interviews with the students; with the other teacher (Núria); the preservice teacher who has implemented LL in her TU (Laura Capdevila).
  • Can be in any language but must include sub-titling in English.
  • Promote connections with other subjects (not just language education) and try to bring this out more.


The template:

  • Question: audio and video? Or audio only?
  • If video: will have the same beginning and closure (Locall logo, information about creator, etc.) but will be more flexible regarding content and format.



2. Our engagement with the App (I04)

  • We are not really involved in the development but we should pilot it.


Decisions made:

  • Ask students from the TEFL course to create materials using the App (Maria & Melinda). These materials can be used with Klaudia & Mónica's students.
  • Need to make sure this is ok.


3. Other points:

  • Mónica & Klaudia have a lot of materials developed. It is uncertain where in the project these might go (module? guidelines?). It seems that there will be a template which they can use to submit materials but this is still unclear to us. Needs to be clarified with Sílvia.
  • We should invite others to contribute to the project webpage (blog section).
  • Melinda has invited preservice teacher to describe her experience. Not clear if the teacher will help (or perhaps write own in Catalan).
  • Mónica will invite her Catalan colleague to contribute.
  • Melinda suggested that Mónica & Klaudia contact the Portuguese team to see if they can publish in Cadernos Didáticos: https://www.ua.pt/pt/cidtff/page/24040
  • Melinda informed everyone of the dates for the next training (online): 28 June - 2 July. We are up next so we need to start thinking about some ideas!
  • Melinda asked everyone to begin looking for conferences to present their output. Ideally we should have a list of dissemination targets by next month.
  • No information about book chapters yet (waiting for acceptance to know exact deadline).


End of meeting.



04/02/21

24/03/21

26/03/21

27/03/21

29/03/21

16/04/21

Tutorial template & guidelines completed

I03 Tutorial Template & Guidelines are now complete!

After considerable back and forth and brainstorming, we have now completed and delivered the template and guidelines for the rest of the partners to use for creating tutorials. We are confident these will provide support for exciting and illustrative tutorials to support LL in teaching.


Tutorial example


I03 Tutorial: Our first example



You can check out our first example of our tutorials entitled the value of focusing in other languages, created by Klaudia, here or clicking on the image below.




Podcast guidelines completed

I03 Podcast Template & Guidelines are now complete!

We have now completed and delivered the template and guidelines for the rest of the partners to use for creating the podcasts. We are confident these will provide support for exciting podcasts to support LL in teaching.


First celebrate a fruitful job and then hands-on to create podcasts!




Podcast example

I03 Podcast: Our first example



You can check out our first example of our podcast where Melinda interviews a young, enthusiastic preservice teacher about her experience with Linguistic Landscaping during her internship. She may still be learning but she has a lot to teach other far more experienced teachers regarding how to be courageous and innovative!


You can listen to the podcast here or clicking on the image of Laura being interviewed below.

More EVENTS

Online Consortium Meeting

Another very productive online meeting. We discussed the templates for the activities to be included in IO2, the planning of the online training week, hosted by Strausbourg and tweaks to be done to the guidelines and templates of IO3.


Coming out of the meeting, here's key points and the to-do list.

Key points:

  • Templates - need to be given a final revision and feedback to the partners by Wednesday April 21st.
  • Training week is schedule for May 31st through June 4th (online). It will feature workshops working with the tutorials so it's important that we have examples and that the guidelines have been fine-tuned.





To-do's (UAB):

Short-term:

  • Provide feedback to template by 21st April.
  • Add student and teacher comments to the activity provided by Mónica.
  • Recruit teachers (disseminate registration and information) to local teachers (not ready yet).


Long-term:

  • Recruit individuals to add experiences to blog
  • Send in activities (e.g. conference) to add to news on webpage
  • Create tutorial: Total beginner's guideline to doing LL

Previous

Homepage

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

Link coming soon!

Fascinating interview with a young teacher who despite her lack of experience shows a profound knowledge of pedagogical aspects needed for a successful LL project!


Introduction:

Welcome to the podcast series of the LOCALL project, where teachers and students share their experience working with linguistic landscapes inside and beyond the classroom walls. Hope you enjoy.


Interviewer:

Okay. Hello. Hello Laura. We're here today with Laura Capdevilla, who is a teacher at Saltells school in Catalonia, and she has very graciously agreed to answer a few questions about her experience with linguistic landscaping. So thank you so much, Laura, for joining us.


Laura:

Thank you. You, my pleasure to be here. Thanks for inviting me.


Interviewer:

We're really excited about hearing what you have to say. So, um, let's start with a question a little bit about your experience. Uh, this was your first time with linguistic landscapes and as part of teaching, can you explain why you were interested in trying it with your students?


Laura:

Yes. Well, I must say that from the very first time I was introduced to the field of Linguistic Landscaping, which was in a third year, a subject, um, called school language project and plurilingualism, I quickly became interested in how much information could be obtained merely by observing, um, the languages present in one's city. So when I came across to the topic, uh, again in practicum four, I thought that maybe it was the right time to launch myself into it. So basically I would say that, uh, it is a field, uh, with great potential to bring to the school as it allowed us to cover many aspects that are very necessary nowadays. And definitely, I can say that the top three reasons that convinced me the most were, uh, first the fact of giving the learners the opportunity to live a different learning experience. Secondly, the idea of taking the classroom out of the school that is to say that the learners, um, could learn about their neighborhood and their city and thus we could make the learning more meaningful for them. And finally, um, the opportunity for them to carry out an investigation under possibilities for them to develop, um, observation and critical thinking skills.


Interviewer:

All excellent answers and excellent reasons for trying this out with your students, which brings me to a second question. Uh, we haven't specified to the audience, what age group you were working with. Linguistic landscapes are often is used more for a secondary students, older students, but I believe you were using it with primary ed students. What age groups were your student?


Laura:

I was working with two groups of 25 students between nine and 10 years. So that is fourth grade of primary education.


Interviewer:

That's pretty young.


Laura: That is yeah. Yeah, yeah.


Interviewer:

So with that idea with working with the young learners on linguistic landscapes, uh, how did you introduce the concept of linguistic landscapes to them and how did they react when you introduced it?


Laura:

Yes, well, uh, first of all, um, the project was composed by 10 sessions and my idea was to the devote the first two to the introduction of the project itself and the concept of linguistic landscape. So in the first lesson I introduced the concept of language and I asked the students the two driving questions of the project, which were, why do we learn languages? And why do we learn English at school? And then altogether they created their Lennon wall, um, giving their opinions on those questions. And I must say that they were very engaged with the activity and many powerful ideas came up. And then it was in the second lesson. When I introduced the concept of linguistic landscape itself and to do it we analyzed both words in order to guess what it could be. And afterwards I presented the challenge, um, that they had as language detectives, which was how many languages do you think you can find in your city? And then, uh, they made their individual hypothesis and finally the last step to introduce a concept, uh, was, uh, presenting a model of my city linguistic landscape and they they did an activity on that.


Interviewer:

Excellent. So you had them break it down and think about what the word linguistic and landscape means, which for fourth graders is not, not common words for English as a foreign language classroom. Right. Very interesting.


Laura:

That's it, yeah.


Interviewer:

And then you had them, you told them they were going to be language detectives that's fun.


Laura:

Exactly. Exactly. Yeah.


Interviewer:

And so they reacted very, they were engaged from day one.


Laura:

Yes. They were thinking on putting on their language, detective glasses and they were really engaged. Yes.


Interviewer:

Excellent. Great. Um, so you've, you've already answered this question, but I think maybe it could be of interest if you could go into a bit more detail for people who are listening, other teachers who might be interested in doing this, you've already kind of sketched out some of the ideas of what you did with the language detectives and whatnot, but, um, can you briefly outline some of the activities you did during your project?


Laura:

Sure. Yes. Um, the sequence of the session was organized, uh, following the steps of a social research. So we started with the Lennon wall activity in which they gave their first answers to the initial questions of the project. And then in the second session, um, the language detectives' challenge was posed and they made their hypothesis. Then when we moved, uh, to the next stage, when, when they collected the data and they had a little more than a week, uh, to check the pictures of the languages present in the city. And afterwards we analyzed the data by answering some questions. And then in lesson five, uh, we interpreted through, through a bit of debate. And finally, in the following session, uh, they drew their conclusions by refuting or validating the hypothesis and, well, uh, the last four lessons where they voted basically to the creation of their city's linguistic landscape brochures, and, the preparation of the oral presentations and the presentations themselves.


Interviewer:

Okay. So, uh, in one of the sessions, you said session three, that they collected the data. Did you, was this outside of the class or did you go as a class into the street?


Laura:

It was outside of the class. So with their families.


Interviewer:

So you had informed beforehand to the families.


Laura:

Exactly. Yes. We sent an email to the families and they did the task together.


Interviewer:

So, um, I've seen the output, but the people who, um, that are listening our listeners, they're not familiar with it, like I am. You did this beautiful thing with the students that created brochures of what they found. And then you uploaded this on a virtual website. Um, maybe you want to explain a little bit more about how you had them then do a recorded presentations, I think without having seen the output, uh, you just kind of skipped over this very wonderful part. So could you explain that a bit?


Laura:

Yes of course. Um, they created their brochures, uh, with the results of their, of their findings on the research of the linguistic landscape. And then I created a virtual museum with their brochures. So they, they explained over there, um, the results, what they loved, what they enjoyed the most, and they shared opinions. And then we shared these virtual world with the families, with the school so that everyone could have a look to the, to the research they've done.


Interviewer:

Yeah. And I just wanted you to highlight that because you kind of, you kind of skipped over and it was such a nice output considering we'll, we'll, we'll put this, uh, link, if we have permission, we can put a link to the webpage on this podcast. So thank you for that. Um, so this was your first time.. Which activities did you like best as a teacher?


Laura:

Definitely um, the activities I enjoyed the most were the ones in which the students were actively involved and they were the main agents of their learning. And I especially loved the one in which they did their group presentations. It was very exciting and rewarding for me to see their learning from the project and the research on the linguistic landscape of Cerdanyola.


Interviewer:

Okay, so as a teacher, that was your favorite one, seeing what they had learnt, what do you think as students ... what do you think that they liked the best?


Laura:

I think that the ones they liked the best were also the ones in which they were the main, the main agents. They, they were, uh, participating, for instance, uh, in lesson four, they were sharing their pictures, analyzing them, the ones in which they took part and were involved, they enjoyed them a lot.


Interviewer:

Yeah. That's excellent. Uh, an excellent overview and an excellent perspective for other teachers. So you, you're saying they need to really be engaged.


Laura:

Of course, that's key.


Interviewer:

So, um, what does em- This is what I asked you, what you felt like they enjoyed the most, what you enjoyed the most. What do you think are the most important points that your students learnt from this experience? I mean, you, you're saying that you enjoyed hearing about what they learnt. For you, what would be the most important or most relevant points that they've learnt?


Laura:

Well there's a lot to say, but I would say that first of all, they have understood what social research means and which are the steps that are implied. And in relation to the linguistic landscape field, they have demonstrated an understanding of the multilingual character of their city and of the considerable presence of English indeed. And they have developed reflections that are so powerful on the reasons for this high presence of English, such as, um, because it's the universal language, uh, because science in English sounds sound better. So they come up with these idea of coolness, um, because of the, of the number of foreigners that now is higher than some, some years ago. And, uh, all this has led them to better understanding the importance of learning this language. And they have made numerous reflections on what learning English brings to them. So for example, they said, uh, meeting people from other cultures, um, traveling, uh, being able to understand foreigners and even having a better job opportunity. So in short, I strongly believe that this project has broadened their perspectives on the coexistence of different languages and cultures in their city. Uh, since at the very beginning of the project, when they made their hypothesis, they thought they would find three languages. So Catalan, Spanish and English, and by the end of the project, they concluded that, uh, Cerdanyola is a multilingual city in which English is highly present. So that's really powerful.


Interviewer:

Yes. And that's uh deep thinking for fourth graders as well. Congratulations on, on, on orienting them towards such, uh, excellent, uh, and deep research thoughts. Yeah. It says a lot about your capabilities as a teacher as well. Um, so, okay. This is what your students learnt from the experience. Uh, what about you, because this was your first time using linguistic landscapes in your teaching. So did you learn anything, uh, as a teacher?


Laura:

Yeah. Um, above all, um, the most relevant learning I have had from my experience has been to discover the extraordinary capacity of the students to reflect on the coexistence of different cultures and languages, the reason, uh, as, as well, the reason, um, for their presence in their immediate, immediate context and the importance of, of learning more from them. So I have definitely experienced first hand the potential of the linguistic landscape field and the opportunities that it has in the classroom.


Interviewer:

Right. Very good points. And perhaps I would highlight one that you didn't say it directly, but sometimes we underestimate our students. Do we not? So in a way you're saying you, you realize that, um, we always, we need to be reminded to never underestimate our students.


Laura:

It's the Pygmalion effect, right? Yes.


Interviewer:

Exactly. So looking back, is there anything that you would do differently?


Laura:

Yes. Yes. I think always we can improve something and for further applications, I would probably like to devote more time to the group work of preparing the presentation of their research results. Since I think that the step of sharing what you have discovered is extremely relevant, uh, for their learning process. And this requires a good preparation that allows them to gain confidence to orally present it. So I would devote more time to this part.


Interviewer:

Good point. Very good point. I know we've covered a lot of ground, but is there any point or anything that you would highlight about linguistic landscapes and teaching that we haven't mentioned yet?


Laura:

Well, basically I would say that it is a field of study that provides a very large input for students and meets all the requirements to lead a meaningful and motivating learning experience for them.


Interviewer:

Okay. Nice point. Right. For everyone who's out there listening to our podcasts, which I hope will be many, many potential linguistic landscape teachers. Uh, what would you tell other teachers who are looking into this idea of implementing linguistic landscapes with their students? Do you have some tips or anything you would share with them?


Laura:

Yeah, I would definitely tell them that it's worth it to give it a try. I must say that at the beginning, uh, I needed a little extra time to gain a deeper insight into the field and feel confident enough to bring the linguistic landscaping into the classroom, but the benefits that it has for (...) for one as a teacher and for the learners are priceless. I mean, you have a natural and genuine opportunity to bring to the classroom issues as important today as globalization, linguistic imperialism, multilingualism, and multiculturalism, or diversity. So, um, all this being worked from a student centered approach in which they are the ones carrying out a social research it's it's, it's great. What can you say? So, uh, I highly recommend it to all those teachers who also believe that this is valuable enough to be integrated into the, into the classroom.


Interviewer:

Oh, thank you. Thank you for those words. Um, very inspiring, very inspiring words. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with our listeners? Any points that we haven't covered? I'm sure there's a lot, but perhaps there's something ...


Laura:

There's especially one I would like to, to emphasize that is, um, the last aspect implicit in the project was, uh, the participation and implication of the families. And, uh, with the language detectives' challenge, there was an opportunity for parents and children to investigate more about their city together and to be engaged in the investigation of their children. This was a very good experience for many of them. And they, in fact, sent us emails expressing their excitement for being able to contribute to their, uh, children's, uh, learning processes. So that's one more reason to give this field of linguistic landscape a chance.


Interviewer:

Wow, that's so empowering. Um, it's absolutely fantastic that the parents were so responsive and in a, in a positive way with what you were doing. That must have been an absolutely fantastic feeling to get those emails.


Laura:

Yes. Yes. Because you see that the work you're doing is worthy.


Interviewer:

Yes. Yes. Well, thank you, Laura. Thank you very much for joining us for this podcast. Uh, you've explained a wonderful experience, and as I've said, we will make the output for your, uh, of your students, uh, linguistic landscape products as language detectives we'll make that available if we have permission from your school to do so. And it's, it's been delightful to hear about your experience. Thank you so much.


Laura: Thank you. My pleasure.


Closing narrative:

Thank you for listening. Please stay tuned to our website and YouTube channel. New and inspiring podcasts are coming soon.


If you'd like to see the students' linguistic landscapes in a 3D gallery, go here.

E1 UNIVERSIDADE DE AVEIRO Jornadas do LALE 10-2021
E2 UNIVERSITAET HAMBURG Tagung LI 06-2022
E3 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Groningen 09-2021
E4 UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA Barcelona 11-2021
E5 UNIVERSITE DE STRASBOURG Strasbourg 10-2021


The UAB team will offer a day and half dissemination event that will consist of talks that showcase
the main aims and outcomes of the project on the first half day. This opening session will be held on a Friday afternoon in order to ensure maximum availability to secondary and primary education
teachers (the main target audience) but will also be open to other educational stakeholders such as teacher educators and principal policy makers (local, regional and national administrators in
departments of education and similar). The second day will be a full day of workshops for teachers
and educators interested in learning about using the approach developed by the project in their own teaching practice.

UAB Events (v)

Local LoCALL meeting

To be updated

22/04/21

22/05/21

31/05/21

4/06/21

17/06/21

18/06/21

TEPE Conference



Kick-off training week

The UAB team presents the tutorials


For the first day of the online training week (hosted by Strausbourg), the UAB team presented the tutorial aims, examples and some ideas on how the workshop participants can help us in the creation of more tutorials that are focused on their needs as LL teacher participants.





End of training week

A VERY COMPLETE AND EXCITING TRAINING WEEK COMES TO AN END

May 31st - June 4th 2021


The week was very well organized and well run. Congratulations to the Strausbourg team. Lots of very inspiring lectures and very fun and creative activities. The ideas for new tutorials are excellent and we are motivated to get started on them right away!



Template in Spanish

With the finalized template ready, we have now prepared the Spanish template. Time now for recruiting teachers to add to our database!


LoCALL Plantilla de actividades


[Utilice esta plantilla para sus actividades de paisaje lingüístico (linguistic landscaping). A continuación, encontrará las categorías que hace falta usar para ayudar con la búsqueda de actividades. Para algunas categorías, damos opciones de respuesta en gris. Le pedimos que elija las que mejor se apliquen a su actividad y elimine las demás. Si estas opciones no se ajustan a su actividad, se puede agregar una otra a estas categorías. Para las otras categorías, le pedimos que complete las casillas abiertas. (Elimine este texto antes de enviarlo). ]


Título de la Actividad

Edad del grupo meta

Duración de la actividad

Materiales y Recursos

Configuración de la interacción

Principal Enfoque didáctico

Ubicación principal de la actividad

Interdisciplinaridad

educación primaria (7-11) - educación secundaria (12-16)

Otro: ____

(incluye dispositivos electrónicos)

individual - grupos pequeños - clase completa - otros:_________


investigación - discusión - creación - literatura - mediado por el/la profesora/a - reflexión - análisis - otros:_________

en la escuela - fuera de la escuela- en casa - museo - biblioteca - otro:_________

Historia - Geografía - Matemáticas - Biología - Artes - Ciencias - Física - Economía - Ciencias sociales - Cursos de idiomas - No aplicable - Otro:_________



Resumen de la actividad

(máx.50 palabras)


Objetivos de aprendizaje

aumentar la conciencia crítica de las lenguas - explorar LL - trabajar creativamente con LL - mejorar y expandir la comprensión de LL - aumentar la conciencia sobre la diversidad lingüística - comprensión teórica de LL - expresar las propias experiencias lingüísticas en el contexto de LL - experimentar LL - explorar LL digital - otros: _________

Descripción de la actividad paso a paso


Posibles adaptaciones

Aquí podemos agregar sugerencias sobre cómo ajustar la actividad específica del país a otros países / ciudades / locaciones / lenguas

Competencias / habilidades a adquirir

Idioma:

escribir - leer - hablar - escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas - no aplicable - otros:_________

Contenidos:

cuando sea aplicable, por ejemplo: conocimiento del establecimiento Unión Europea - sociedad y migración -

no aplicable - otro:_________

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

descripción - reflexión - trabajo en equipo - ciudadanía - transferencia de habilidades - no aplicable - otro: _________

Competencias / habilidades necesarias

Lengua meta: escribir - leer - hablar - escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas - no aplicable - otro: _________

Conocimiento del contenido/disciplina:

...

- no aplicable - otro: _________

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

descripción - reflexión - trabajo en equipo - ciudadanía - transferencia de habilidades - no aplicable - otro: _________

Retroalimentación

Ejemplos de implementación

Retroalimentación del/de la profesor/a

Retroalimentación del alumnado




Example 1

Language detective

Targeted age group

Duration

Materials and Resources

Classroom distribution

Teaching Approaches

Activity Location

Interdisciplinary links

secondary education (12-16)

2 hours:


15 min. explanation


1 hour picture taking


45 min. analysis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Wncr4k1y30&t=1s


camera,

something to write on (notebook, computer)


(several photographs as inspiration, see below)

individual - small groups - whole class


research reflection analysis

in school - outside

history geography

language courses



Activity summary (max. 50 words)

Students will become language detectives in their own environment. By taking photographs of the linguistic landscape students will come to an analysis of the visible language and develop a critical opinion on this.

Learning objectives

raising awareness of language diversity - theoretic understanding of LL - placing one’s own experiences in the context of LL - raising critical language awareness - exploring LL

Step by step activity description

In this activity, you will go on the hunt for languages that are visible in your own environment - you will become a Language Detective!


Step 1: Introduction


Watch the video of what a Linguistic Landscape is, where we can find linguistic landscapes and in what types of linguistic landscapes there are.


Step 2: Start investigating!

Now you can start your own investigation!

Pick a location that you want to investigate. This can be the street you live in, your route to school, a big shopping street, or for example the supermarket. Everything goes! Be on the lookout for everything that you come across and that involves language.

Take photographs of the things you see that use language. Try to take at least 15 photographs, but more is always possible! Make the language(s) that you see as visible as possible in the photograph.


Step 3: Analyze your photographs in groups


Using the photographs you’ve taken in step 2, in groups you will start analyzing these. You can make this analysis based upon questions like:

How many languages do you see in each photograph? (1, 2 or 3 or more)

What is the function of the text? Does it give information, does it want to sell anything, is it an official sign? Maybe you can think of another function.

What are the languages that you see?


Write a summary based upon the questions. An example can be:

We were language detectives in XX, XX and XX. (Paste your photographs here)

We have analyzed a total of … photographs

__ (__%) of these photographs showed one language

__ (__%) of these photographs showed two languages

__ (__%) of these photographs showed three languages

The language that was used most was __, after that, it was __

The languages were used in different situations. English was used most on posters in shops. So it had the goal to sell something. Etcetera.

Refer to the photographs if you are talking about a specific signage that for example surprised you or sparked your interest.


Step 4: Give your opinion!


Imagine that you are giving advice to your local government. What did you like in the languages you saw in the public space, do you want to see any changes being made?

Possible adaptations

This activity can easily be done in every other city or even in a small town.

To be acquired competencies/skills

Language

speaking

writing




Subject knowledge

not applicable

21st-century skills and critical thinking

interaction

description

transfer

reflection skills


Required competencies/skills

Language

speaking

writing

recognizing other languages

Subject knowledge

Not applicable

21st-century skills

Examples of implementation


Reaction/ feedback teacher

“It was great to see the enthusiasm the students had to go and explore their own environments on the topic of Linguist Landscapes. I was very impressed, but also surprised with how opinionated the students were with regards to seeing more Frisian language in their own environment.”

Reaction/ feedback student

“We liked to be language detectives for once! We were disappointed with the amount of signage in Frisian, since we are in Fryslân! Especially the ‘Leeuwarden’ signs, because why not use ‘Ljouwert’? There should also be more English signs, that can ensure more visitors ;) ”

“Overall, we feel that Frisian should be used more in the city because Ljouwert is, in the end, the capital city of Fryslân and welcomes a lot of tourists because of that. Therefore it is important to show that we are proud of our language and want it to survive.”


Example 2


Graffiti Wall

Targeted age group

Duration

Materials and Resources

Classroom distribution

Teaching Approaches

Activity Location

Interdisciplinary links

secondary education (12-16)

3 hours

posters, pens, paint, tape, … // digital devices and programs: gimp. paint, autodesk sketchbook

small groups - whole class


Creating

in school

Arts



Activity summary (max. 50 words)

Students will create a design for a blank wall in your school. They will present their design during an exhibition and will explain the language choices they’ve made.

Learning objectives

Working creatively with LL - exploring LL

Step by step activity description

Step 1: Introduction


Have a brainstorming session about the following themes on the white board/smart board:

Languages present in the city

Languages present in [a specific part of the school]


Step 2: Start creating


There is a blank wall present in [a specific part of the school] that needs painting! The painting needs to represent the different languages in the school. You are all invited to help design this wall!


Form groups of 2-4 people.

Plan with your group which languages you want to include and write down why.

Plan with your group what contents you want to be present and write down why.

design the wall: You can use digital programs or pen and paper to design the wall.


Step 3: Host an exhibition!


Organize an exhibition with all the designs of the graffiti walls in the classroom and discuss them together. Present your graffiti wall and explain which languages you chose and why.

Possible adaptations

This activity can easily be done in every school.

To be acquired competencies/skills

Language:

writing - speaking - recognizing other languages

Subject knowledge:

not applicable

21st-century skills and critical thinking:

use of computer - creativity - presentation skills

Required competencies/skills

Language: writing - reading - recognizing other languages -

Subject knowledge: not applicable

21st-century skills:

use of computer - creativity

Examples of implementation

Reaction/ feedback teacher

-

Reaction/ feedback student

-



Example 3


Entry activity (Barcelona)

Targeted age group

Duration

Materials and Resources

Classroom distribution

Teaching Approaches

Activity Location

Interdisciplinary links

secondary education (12-16)

2x 2 hours (two separate sessions)

Impulse picture (see material example)

individual -

whole class


research - discussion- reflection

in school

geography - language courses



Activity summary (max. 50 words)

In this entry activity, students will become familiar with LL by discussing an example of LL and documenting and discussing their own LL.

Learning objectives

Exploring LL - a broad understanding of LL - placing one’s own language experiences in the context of LL - experiencing LL

Step by step activity description

Entry event

Teacher projects a photo taken at the entrance of a hairdresser’s located in Cambrils to start a

conversation. The conversation will follow some guiding questions.


Follow-up activity

After the conversation, students are asked to look for images that present a variety of languages. They can do that during the weekend, while they do family activities in their town or in any other places they may visit.


The students will upload their pictures on a collaborative document that will be available in their online classroom. Next to their images they will have to write down the languages that appear. They will have to explain why they think the images contain these languages, in the same way they did in the first session.


Possible adaptations

For step 1, the teacher can choose another photo that maybe resonates more with the local environment.

To be acquired competencies/skills

Language

speaking - listening - recognizing other languages



Subject knowledge


not applicable

21st-century skills and critical thinking


use of computer - interaction - description - reflection


Required competencies/skills

Language


speaking - listening

Subject knowledge


not applicable

21st-century skills


use of computer - interaction - description

Examples of implementation


Reaction/ feedback teacher

-

Reaction/ feedback student

-



Another conference submission

Fingers crossed. We've just sent in an abstract to ICERI Seville 2021 (Co-authors: Monica, Klaudia and Melinda)

More Events

Homepage

previous

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

Link coming soon!

Fascinating interview with a young teacher who despite her lack of experience shows a profound knowledge of pedagogical aspects needed for a successful LL project!


Introduction:

Welcome to the podcast series of the LOCALL project, where teachers and students share their experience working with linguistic landscapes inside and beyond the classroom walls. Hope you enjoy.


Interviewer:

Okay. Hello. Hello Laura. We're here today with Laura Capdevilla, who is a teacher at Saltells school in Catalonia, and she has very graciously agreed to answer a few questions about her experience with linguistic landscaping. So thank you so much, Laura, for joining us.


Laura:

Thank you. You, my pleasure to be here. Thanks for inviting me.


Interviewer:

We're really excited about hearing what you have to say. So, um, let's start with a question a little bit about your experience. Uh, this was your first time with linguistic landscapes and as part of teaching, can you explain why you were interested in trying it with your students?


Laura:

Yes. Well, I must say that from the very first time I was introduced to the field of Linguistic Landscaping, which was in a third year, a subject, um, called school language project and plurilingualism, I quickly became interested in how much information could be obtained merely by observing, um, the languages present in one's city. So when I came across to the topic, uh, again in practicum four, I thought that maybe it was the right time to launch myself into it. So basically I would say that, uh, it is a field, uh, with great potential to bring to the school as it allowed us to cover many aspects that are very necessary nowadays. And definitely, I can say that the top three reasons that convinced me the most were, uh, first the fact of giving the learners the opportunity to live a different learning experience. Secondly, the idea of taking the classroom out of the school that is to say that the learners, um, could learn about their neighborhood and their city and thus we could make the learning more meaningful for them. And finally, um, the opportunity for them to carry out an investigation under possibilities for them to develop, um, observation and critical thinking skills.


Interviewer:

All excellent answers and excellent reasons for trying this out with your students, which brings me to a second question. Uh, we haven't specified to the audience, what age group you were working with. Linguistic landscapes are often is used more for a secondary students, older students, but I believe you were using it with primary ed students. What age groups were your student?


Laura:

I was working with two groups of 25 students between nine and 10 years. So that is fourth grade of primary education.


Interviewer:

That's pretty young.


Laura: That is yeah. Yeah, yeah.


Interviewer:

So with that idea with working with the young learners on linguistic landscapes, uh, how did you introduce the concept of linguistic landscapes to them and how did they react when you introduced it?


Laura:

Yes, well, uh, first of all, um, the project was composed by 10 sessions and my idea was to the devote the first two to the introduction of the project itself and the concept of linguistic landscape. So in the first lesson I introduced the concept of language and I asked the students the two driving questions of the project, which were, why do we learn languages? And why do we learn English at school? And then altogether they created their Lennon wall, um, giving their opinions on those questions. And I must say that they were very engaged with the activity and many powerful ideas came up. And then it was in the second lesson. When I introduced the concept of linguistic landscape itself and to do it we analyzed both words in order to guess what it could be. And afterwards I presented the challenge, um, that they had as language detectives, which was how many languages do you think you can find in your city? And then, uh, they made their individual hypothesis and finally the last step to introduce a concept, uh, was, uh, presenting a model of my city linguistic landscape and they they did an activity on that.


Interviewer:

Excellent. So you had them break it down and think about what the word linguistic and landscape means, which for fourth graders is not, not common words for English as a foreign language classroom. Right. Very interesting.


Laura:

That's it, yeah.


Interviewer:

And then you had them, you told them they were going to be language detectives that's fun.


Laura:

Exactly. Exactly. Yeah.


Interviewer:

And so they reacted very, they were engaged from day one.


Laura:

Yes. They were thinking on putting on their language, detective glasses and they were really engaged. Yes.


Interviewer:

Excellent. Great. Um, so you've, you've already answered this question, but I think maybe it could be of interest if you could go into a bit more detail for people who are listening, other teachers who might be interested in doing this, you've already kind of sketched out some of the ideas of what you did with the language detectives and whatnot, but, um, can you briefly outline some of the activities you did during your project?


Laura:

Sure. Yes. Um, the sequence of the session was organized, uh, following the steps of a social research. So we started with the Lennon wall activity in which they gave their first answers to the initial questions of the project. And then in the second session, um, the language detectives' challenge was posed and they made their hypothesis. Then when we moved, uh, to the next stage, when, when they collected the data and they had a little more than a week, uh, to check the pictures of the languages present in the city. And afterwards we analyzed the data by answering some questions. And then in lesson five, uh, we interpreted through, through a bit of debate. And finally, in the following session, uh, they drew their conclusions by refuting or validating the hypothesis and, well, uh, the last four lessons where they voted basically to the creation of their city's linguistic landscape brochures, and, the preparation of the oral presentations and the presentations themselves.


Interviewer:

Okay. So, uh, in one of the sessions, you said session three, that they collected the data. Did you, was this outside of the class or did you go as a class into the street?


Laura:

It was outside of the class. So with their families.


Interviewer:

So you had informed beforehand to the families.


Laura:

Exactly. Yes. We sent an email to the families and they did the task together.


Interviewer:

So, um, I've seen the output, but the people who, um, that are listening our listeners, they're not familiar with it, like I am. You did this beautiful thing with the students that created brochures of what they found. And then you uploaded this on a virtual website. Um, maybe you want to explain a little bit more about how you had them then do a recorded presentations, I think without having seen the output, uh, you just kind of skipped over this very wonderful part. So could you explain that a bit?


Laura:

Yes of course. Um, they created their brochures, uh, with the results of their, of their findings on the research of the linguistic landscape. And then I created a virtual museum with their brochures. So they, they explained over there, um, the results, what they loved, what they enjoyed the most, and they shared opinions. And then we shared these virtual world with the families, with the school so that everyone could have a look to the, to the research they've done.


Interviewer:

Yeah. And I just wanted you to highlight that because you kind of, you kind of skipped over and it was such a nice output considering we'll, we'll, we'll put this, uh, link, if we have permission, we can put a link to the webpage on this podcast. So thank you for that. Um, so this was your first time.. Which activities did you like best as a teacher?


Laura:

Definitely um, the activities I enjoyed the most were the ones in which the students were actively involved and they were the main agents of their learning. And I especially loved the one in which they did their group presentations. It was very exciting and rewarding for me to see their learning from the project and the research on the linguistic landscape of Cerdanyola.


Interviewer:

Okay, so as a teacher, that was your favorite one, seeing what they had learnt, what do you think as students ... what do you think that they liked the best?


Laura:

I think that the ones they liked the best were also the ones in which they were the main, the main agents. They, they were, uh, participating, for instance, uh, in lesson four, they were sharing their pictures, analyzing them, the ones in which they took part and were involved, they enjoyed them a lot.


Interviewer:

Yeah. That's excellent. Uh, an excellent overview and an excellent perspective for other teachers. So you, you're saying they need to really be engaged.


Laura:

Of course, that's key.


Interviewer:

So, um, what does em- This is what I asked you, what you felt like they enjoyed the most, what you enjoyed the most. What do you think are the most important points that your students learnt from this experience? I mean, you, you're saying that you enjoyed hearing about what they learnt. For you, what would be the most important or most relevant points that they've learnt?


Laura:

Well there's a lot to say, but I would say that first of all, they have understood what social research means and which are the steps that are implied. And in relation to the linguistic landscape field, they have demonstrated an understanding of the multilingual character of their city and of the considerable presence of English indeed. And they have developed reflections that are so powerful on the reasons for this high presence of English, such as, um, because it's the universal language, uh, because science in English sounds sound better. So they come up with these idea of coolness, um, because of the, of the number of foreigners that now is higher than some, some years ago. And, uh, all this has led them to better understanding the importance of learning this language. And they have made numerous reflections on what learning English brings to them. So for example, they said, uh, meeting people from other cultures, um, traveling, uh, being able to understand foreigners and even having a better job opportunity. So in short, I strongly believe that this project has broadened their perspectives on the coexistence of different languages and cultures in their city. Uh, since at the very beginning of the project, when they made their hypothesis, they thought they would find three languages. So Catalan, Spanish and English, and by the end of the project, they concluded that, uh, Cerdanyola is a multilingual city in which English is highly present. So that's really powerful.


Interviewer:

Yes. And that's uh deep thinking for fourth graders as well. Congratulations on, on, on orienting them towards such, uh, excellent, uh, and deep research thoughts. Yeah. It says a lot about your capabilities as a teacher as well. Um, so, okay. This is what your students learnt from the experience. Uh, what about you, because this was your first time using linguistic landscapes in your teaching. So did you learn anything, uh, as a teacher?


Laura:

Yeah. Um, above all, um, the most relevant learning I have had from my experience has been to discover the extraordinary capacity of the students to reflect on the coexistence of different cultures and languages, the reason, uh, as, as well, the reason, um, for their presence in their immediate, immediate context and the importance of, of learning more from them. So I have definitely experienced first hand the potential of the linguistic landscape field and the opportunities that it has in the classroom.


Interviewer:

Right. Very good points. And perhaps I would highlight one that you didn't say it directly, but sometimes we underestimate our students. Do we not? So in a way you're saying you, you realize that, um, we always, we need to be reminded to never underestimate our students.


Laura:

It's the Pygmalion effect, right? Yes.


Interviewer:

Exactly. So looking back, is there anything that you would do differently?


Laura:

Yes. Yes. I think always we can improve something and for further applications, I would probably like to devote more time to the group work of preparing the presentation of their research results. Since I think that the step of sharing what you have discovered is extremely relevant, uh, for their learning process. And this requires a good preparation that allows them to gain confidence to orally present it. So I would devote more time to this part.


Interviewer:

Good point. Very good point. I know we've covered a lot of ground, but is there any point or anything that you would highlight about linguistic landscapes and teaching that we haven't mentioned yet?


Laura:

Well, basically I would say that it is a field of study that provides a very large input for students and meets all the requirements to lead a meaningful and motivating learning experience for them.


Interviewer:

Okay. Nice point. Right. For everyone who's out there listening to our podcasts, which I hope will be many, many potential linguistic landscape teachers. Uh, what would you tell other teachers who are looking into this idea of implementing linguistic landscapes with their students? Do you have some tips or anything you would share with them?


Laura:

Yeah, I would definitely tell them that it's worth it to give it a try. I must say that at the beginning, uh, I needed a little extra time to gain a deeper insight into the field and feel confident enough to bring the linguistic landscaping into the classroom, but the benefits that it has for (...) for one as a teacher and for the learners are priceless. I mean, you have a natural and genuine opportunity to bring to the classroom issues as important today as globalization, linguistic imperialism, multilingualism, and multiculturalism, or diversity. So, um, all this being worked from a student centered approach in which they are the ones carrying out a social research it's it's, it's great. What can you say? So, uh, I highly recommend it to all those teachers who also believe that this is valuable enough to be integrated into the, into the classroom.


Interviewer:

Oh, thank you. Thank you for those words. Um, very inspiring, very inspiring words. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with our listeners? Any points that we haven't covered? I'm sure there's a lot, but perhaps there's something ...


Laura:

There's especially one I would like to, to emphasize that is, um, the last aspect implicit in the project was, uh, the participation and implication of the families. And, uh, with the language detectives' challenge, there was an opportunity for parents and children to investigate more about their city together and to be engaged in the investigation of their children. This was a very good experience for many of them. And they, in fact, sent us emails expressing their excitement for being able to contribute to their, uh, children's, uh, learning processes. So that's one more reason to give this field of linguistic landscape a chance.


Interviewer:

Wow, that's so empowering. Um, it's absolutely fantastic that the parents were so responsive and in a, in a positive way with what you were doing. That must have been an absolutely fantastic feeling to get those emails.


Laura:

Yes. Yes. Because you see that the work you're doing is worthy.


Interviewer:

Yes. Yes. Well, thank you, Laura. Thank you very much for joining us for this podcast. Uh, you've explained a wonderful experience, and as I've said, we will make the output for your, uh, of your students, uh, linguistic landscape products as language detectives we'll make that available if we have permission from your school to do so. And it's, it's been delightful to hear about your experience. Thank you so much.


Laura: Thank you. My pleasure.


Closing narrative:

Thank you for listening. Please stay tuned to our website and YouTube channel. New and inspiring podcasts are coming soon.


If you'd like to see the students' linguistic landscapes in a 3D gallery, go here.

After the success of the TEPE conference, Mónica and Klaudia are ready for another conference experience! We've just submitted an abstract to the ICERI Seville 2021 conference. Fingers crossed it's accepted!



UAB Events (vi)

Local LoCALL meeting

Mónica López has created two more podcasts for the UAB team! She has interviewed her students to get some insight into their perspectives on the homescapes. Some great insights from these young language learners. Listen to them out here!





09/06/21

23/06/21

25/10/21

12/11/21

20-26/11/21

Jan/22

3 Spanish modules
completed

Mónica has completed 3 modules in Spanish! What an awesome UAB team!


Activity 1:

LoCALL Plantilla de actividades

Paisaje Lingüístico en casa

Edad del grupo meta

Duración de la actividad

Materiales y Recursos

Configuración de la interacción

Principal Enfoque didáctico

Ubicación principal de la actividad

Interdisciplinaridad

educación primaria (10-11)


Presentación

Google

Video

Tutorial

Individual

+ contribuciones colaborativas

investigación

En casa

Arte

Informática



Resumen de la actividad

(máx.50 palabras)

La maestra presenta un reto: ¿Cuántas lenguas viven en tu casa? y pide al alumnado que busquen las lenguas que viven en sus casas y creen un collage mostrándolas y, si quieren, puede crear un vídeo explicando lo que han encontrado. Para ello pueden seguir los modelos mostrados en la presentación de google y en los tutoriales. Nota: Esta actividad se rediseñó para su implementación durante el bloqueo de Covid-19 en España, pero ahora se puede adaptar para que se ajuste a cursos en línea o híbridos (bi-modalidades).

Objetivos de aprendizaje

Explorar LL

Aumentar la conciencia sobre la diversidad lingüística

Trabajar creativamente con LL

Expresar artísticamente las propias experiencias lingüísticas en el contexto de LL

Descripción de la actividad paso a paso

Introducción

Se comparte una presentación Google con el alumnado en la que encontraran la definición del concepto “paisaje lingüístico” adaptada al nivel del alumnado, así como toda la información necesaria para poder realizar el reto: ¿Cuántas lenguas viven en tu casa?:

1 presentación del reto a través de la pregunta: ¿Cuántas lenguas viven en tu casa?

2 a continuación el alumnado puede visionar un video creado por la maestra como modelo, mostrando su paisaje lingüístico en casa.

3 la maestra les recuerda el collage que crearon en otoño para así poder volver a aplicar la técnica aprendida y crear un nuevo collage, pero esta vez con imágenes del paisaje lingüístico descubierto en sus casas.

4 a través de la diapositiva 8 de la presentación de Google, la maestra marca los pasos que el alumnado debe seguir para completar el reto:

4.1 Observa mi video

4.2 Busca las lenguas que viven en tu casa

4.3 Toma fotos de aquellos objetos o lugares donde la lengua vive, aparece.

4.4 Sube las fotos a tu drive de la escuela

4.5 Crea tu collage y entrégalo en google classroom. Mira este tutorial para ayudarte.

4.6 Escribe las lenguas que encuentres en este documento.

4.7 Opcional: Crea un vídeo explicando tus descubrimientos y entrégalo en google classroom.

4.8 Disfrútalo!

4.9 Comprueba que has conseguido el reto con la checklist facilitada (autoevaluación) (Diapositiva 11 de la presentación)

5 la maestra comparte las creaciones y descubrimientos en google classroom

Posibles adaptaciones

Se puede realizar tal cual en cualquier país y en cualquier idioma. De hecho, esta propuesta se llevó a cabo en la asignatura de arte y en lengua inglesa.

Competencias / habilidades a adquirir

Idioma:

escribir - leer - hablar - escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas

Contenidos:

Lenguas y culturas

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

trabajo en equipo

Competencias / habilidades necesarias

Lengua meta:

escribir - leer escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas

Conocimiento del contenido/disciplina:

No aplicable

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

descripción - reflexión - trabajo en equipo -

Retroalimentación

Ejemplos de implementación

Collage


Video

Retroalimentación del/de la profesor/a

Teniendo en cuenta la situación tan excepcional que el alumnado y profesorado estaba viviendo (confinamiento Covid 19) podemos considerar que la actividad fue todo un éxito, tanto a nivel de participación como de calidad.

Retroalimentación del alumnado

Posteriormente el alumnado pudo contestar un cuestionario en el que se les preguntaba cuál de las actividades les había gustado más, la mayoría del alumnado contestó la creación del collage. También se pudo hablar en persona con un pequeño grupo de alumnos voluntarios y algunos de ellos mencionaron que la actividad de buscar las lenguas que viven en sus casas les gustó mucho porque descubrieron algo que nunca se habían planteado y les impresionó descubrir tantas lenguas viviendo en sus casas



Activity 2:

LoCALL Plantilla de actividades


Paisaje Lingüístico de nuestra ciudad: Crear un collage digital

Edad del grupo meta

Duración de la actividad

Materiales y Recursos

Configuración de la interacción

Principal Enfoque didáctico

Ubicación principal de la actividad

Interdisciplinaridad

educación primaria (10-11)

Presentación

Google con tutoriales

Individual

+ contribuciones colaborativas


investigación

fuera de la escuela- en casa -A

Arte

Informática



Resumen de la actividad

(máx.50 palabras)

La maestra presenta un reto: ¿Cuántas lenguas viven en tu ciudad? Pide al alumnado que busquen las lenguas que viven en sus ciudades y creen un collage mostrándolas. Para ello pueden seguir los modelos mostrados en la presentación de google y en los tutoriales. Nota: Esta actividad se rediseñó para su implementación durante el bloqueo de Covid-19 en España, pero ahora se puede adaptar para que se ajuste a cursos en línea o híbridos (bi-modalidades).


Objetivos de aprendizaje

Explorar LL

Aumentar la conciencia sobre la diversidad lingüística

Trabajar creativamente con LL

Expresar artísticamente las propias experiencias lingüísticas en el contexto de LL

Descripción de la actividad paso a paso

Introducción

Se comparte una presentación Google con el alumnado en la que la maestra les felicita por los paisajes lingüísticos hallados en su casa y los anima a realizar un nuevo reto: ¿Cuántas lenguas viven en tu ciudad? Para poder realizarlo, el alumnado puede seguir los siguientes pasos especificados en la presentación de google compartida. Estos pasos son los siguientes:

1 la maestra recuerda la definición del término “Paisaje Lingüístico”

2 presentación del nuevo reto a través de la pregunta: ¿Cuántas lenguas viven en tu ciudad?

3 la maestra propone que creen un collage con las fotos donde se vean las lenguas que viven en su ciudad siguiendo los siguientes pasos:

3.1 Cuando salgáis a pasear con vuestras familias buscad diferentes lenguas que veáis en vuestra ciudad

3.2 Cada vez que localicéis, descubráis una lengua nueva, haced una foto del lugar donde la hayáis visto.

3.3 Sube tus fotos al drive siguiendo el tutorial facilitado.

3.4 Crea tu collage. Puedes ver cómo hacerlo en este tutorial

3.5 Escribe el nombre de las lenguas encontradas en tu ciudad en el collage y en el documento colaborativo para así tener un listado de todas las lenguas descubiertas.

3.6 Disfrútalo!

3.7Comprueba que has conseguido el reto con la checklist facilitada (autoevaluación) (Diapositiva 7 de la presentación)


4 la maestra comparte las creaciones y descubrimientos en google classroom

Posibles adaptaciones

SE puede realizar tal cual en cualquier país y en cualquier idioma. De hecho, esta propuesta se llevó a cabo en la asignatura de arte y en lengua inglesa.

Competencias / habilidades a adquirir

Idioma:

escribir - leer - hablar - escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas

Contenidos:

Lenguas y culturas

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

trabajo en equipo

Competencias / habilidades necesarias

Lengua meta:

escribir - leer escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas

Conocimiento del contenido/disciplina:

No aplicable

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

descripción - reflexión - trabajo en equipo -

Retroalimentación

Ejemplos de implementación


Retroalimentación del/de la profesor/a

Teniendo en cuenta la situación tan excepcional que el alumnado y profesorado estaba viviendo (confinamiento Covid 19) podemos considerar que la actividad fue todo un éxito, tanto a nivel de participación como de calidad.

Retroalimentación del alumnado

Posteriormente el alumnado pudo contestar un cuestionario en el que se les preguntaba cuál de las actividades les había gustado más, la mayoría del alumnado contestó la creación del collage. También se pudo hablar en persona con un pequeño grupo de alumnos voluntarios y algunos de ellos mencionaron que la actividad de buscar las lenguas que viven en sus ciudades les gustó mucho porque descubrieron algo que nunca se habían planteado. Fue una actividad que les resultó muy interesante.


Activity 3:

LoCALL Plantilla de actividades

Nube de palabras. ¿Qué lenguas te intrigan más?

Edad del grupo meta

Duración de la actividad

Materiales y Recursos

Configuración de la interacción

Principal Enfoque didáctico

Ubicación principal de la actividad

Interdisciplinaridad

educación primaria (10-11)

Presentación

Google con tutoriales

Cuestionario de Google

Individual

+ contribuciones colaborativas


creación - mediado por el/la profesora/a - reflexión - análisis -

fuera de la escuela- en casa

Arte

Informática



Resumen de la actividad

(máx.50 palabras)

Tras haber descubierto los paisajes lingüísticos de casa y de la ciudad donde vive el alumnado. La maestra propone al alumnado reflexionar sobre las lenguas descubiertas y crear una nube de palabras con aquella lengua que más les ha intrigado. Nota: Esta actividad se rediseñó para su implementación durante el bloqueo de Covid-19 en España, pero ahora se puede adaptar para que se ajuste a cursos en línea o híbridos (bi-modalidades).

Objetivos de aprendizaje

Trabajar creativamente con LL - mejorar y expandir la comprensión de LL - aumentar la conciencia sobre la diversidad lingüística - expresar las propias experiencias lingüísticas en el contexto de LL -

Descripción de la actividad paso a paso

Introducción

La maestra comparte una presentación de google con las lenguas que se han descubierto e incluido en los paisajes lingüísticos de casa y de la ciudad en la que vive el alumnado. A. continuación les propone dos tareas:

1 contestar un cuestionario de google para reflexionar sobre los paisajes lingüísticos creados. Al mismo tiempo este cuestionario será una fuente de información importante para la maestra ya que podrá evaluar hasta qué punto el alumnado ha aumentado su conciencia sobre la diversidad lingüística.

2 crear una nube de palabras con aquella lengua que más les ha intrigado. Para ello seguirán los siguientes pasos especificados en la presentación de google:

2.1 DE la lista de lenguas creada colaborativamente, elige la que más te intrigue

2.2 piensa en tres palabras que te gustaría saber en esa lengua

2.3 Ve al traductor google y completa el documento de google que ha compartido tu maestra contigo

2.4 Crea tu nube de palabras. Visiona el tutorial 1 para ayudarte (ver diapositiva 7)

2.5 Visiona el tutorial 2 para ayudarte a crear tu nube de palabras (ver diapositiva 9)

2.6 Copia y pega tu nube de palabras en el documento colaborativo

2.7 Visiona el tutorial 3 de la diapositiva 12 para ayudarte a pegar tu nube de palabras en el documento colaborativo.

2.8 Finalmente graba un audio pronunciando las 5 palabras que has seleccionado en la lengua que más te ha intrigado.

2.9 Comprueba que has conseguido el reto con la checklist facilitada (autoevaluación) (Diapositiva 11 de la presentación)

Posibles adaptaciones

Se puede realizar tal cual en cualquier país y en cualquier idioma. De hecho, esta propuesta se llevó a cabo en la asignatura de arte y en lengua inglesa.

Competencias / habilidades a adquirir

Idioma:

escribir - leer - hablar - escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas

Contenidos:

Lenguas y culturas

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

reflexión - trabajo en equipo transferencia de habilidades

Competencias / habilidades necesarias

Lengua meta:

escribir - leer escuchar - reconocer otros idiomas

Conocimiento del contenido/disciplina:

No aplicable

Habilidades y pensamiento crítico del siglo XXI:

uso de la tecnología- creatividad - interacción -

reflexión - trabajo en equipo transferencia de habilidades

Retroalimentación

Ejemplos de implementación



Retroalimentación del/de la profesor/a

Teniendo en cuenta la situación tan excepcional que el alumnado y profesorado estaba viviendo (confinamiento por Covid 19) podemos considerar que la actividad fue todo un éxito, tanto a nivel de participación como de calidad.

Retroalimentación del alumnado

Las respuestas obtenidas en el cuestionario muestran que la mayoría del alumnado pudo reflexionar y argumentar sobre la realidad lingüística de su entorno y que disfrutaron realizando la secuencia de actividades propuesta. Aquí mostramos algunas respuestas:

Lenguas que más intrigaron al alumnado


Las que no esperaban encontrar


Las actividades que más gustaron



Si les gustó crear paisajes lingüísticos




1 Spanish & 1 Catalan module completed

Former student (now teacher) Laura Capdevila has prepared 2 modules: 1 in English and 1 in Spanish. Wonderful materials!

LoCALL activity Template

Our Lennon Wall

Targeted age group

Duration

Materials and Resources

Grouping

Teaching Approaches

Activity Location

Interdisciplinary links

primary education (9-10)

1 hour

Visual presentation as a support and guidance for the TU introduction (computer and projector)

Lennon Wall mural

(cardboard)

Bluish and yellowish post-its and a classroom timer

individual & whole class

teacher presentation, creating & reflection

in school

history & geography

Activity summary (max. 50 words)

The activity is aimed at discovering student’s first ideas on the driving questions of the TU ‘Why do we learn languages?’ and ‘Why do we learn English at school?’ So, basically, student’s initial ideas and perceptions are captured in an ‘Expressive Mural’ by doing honor to the urban landscape of HK’s Lennon Wall.

Learning objectives

raising critical language awareness

Step by step activity description

Step 1. Introduction to the TU and the Lennon Wall activity.

The teacher introduces the Teaching Unit and the Lennon Wall activity with the support of the visual presentation and asks for student’s interaction throughout it. First, the teacher explains the instructions for the activity and shows an example of Lennon Wall (HK’s) in order to provide students with a model.

Step 2. Lennon Wall creation

An A0 cardboard with the 2 questions located in the middle is stuck on the classroom wall. Then, the students receive two post-its: (1) Bluish post-it to answer the question ‘Why do we learn languages?’ and (2) Yellowish post-it to answer ‘Why do we learn English at school?’ They are allowed to use their L1 to better express their ideas and perceptions on the topic. However, once they got the response written in their mother tongue, they will be encouraged to try and write it in English (always counting on the language support that the teacher will be providing them when they ask for help). As soon as they complete the answers, they will stick them on Lennon Wall. Additionally, they would be encouraged to draw in a piece of paper any sign, graffiti, icon or even a word, that they relate with the topic (i.e. a speech bubble, a phone, a plane...) and will stick it on the wall.

Step 3. Time to share and discuss!

Time will be up after 20 minutes, and it will be the moment to have a general overview of their answers and drawings. Students share their answers voluntarily and the teacher provides feedback on those ideas (i.e. wow, listen to “X” answer, s/he has made a fantastic point here, s/he says that we learn English to speak with people from other countries. And why English and not Italian or Portuguese?) The reflections that arose from this activity will be the starting point for the following ones.

Possible adaptations

This activity can easily be carried out in any other city. However, if the language used is the foreign language of the pupils, it will require detailed and thorough adaptation to their level and needs.

To be acquired competencies/ skills

Language:

Writing Listening

Subject knowledge: not applicable

21st-century skills and critical thinking:

creativity, interaction and reflection

Required competencies/ skills

Language:

Writing Listening

Subject knowledge: not applicable

21st-century skills:

interaction reflection

Feedback

Examples of implementation

Reaction/ feedback teacher

I was amazed by the interest the students showed in the topic and the opinions and thoughts they shared. They came up with very good reflections and showed a lot of interest in reflecting on the use of languages. It also surprised me that although they could use their L1 to express their ideas, many of them made the effort to express them in their L2.

Reaction/ feedback student

The students were very interested in the origins of Lennon's mural and enjoyed asking questions about its contextualization and the immense number of languages that make it up. Moreover, they came up with very interesting reflections such as that we learn languages to express our thoughts and to share with others. On the other hand, there were some very powerful answers as to why we learn English, such as because it is the universal language or in order to travel and get to know other cultures.

Cerdanyola’s LL Language Detectives

Targeted age group

Duration

Materials and Resources

Grouping

Teaching Approache s

Activity Location

Interdisciplinary links

primary education (9-10)

2 hours

30 min.

Linguistic Landscape Concept + Language Detective’s role & Challenge

30 min.

Model of

Linguistic Landscape. Questions about Sant Cugat’s LL

1 hour

Picture taking

Google Slides interactive presentation (computer)

Language support to make the hypothesis

Pictures from Sant Cugat’s Linguistic Landscape as a model.

Data collection instructions

Blank sheets and pencils

Camera

individual and small groups

teacher presentati on, reflection, research and discussion

in school and outside

history geography language courses

Activity summary (max. 50 words)

The learners are presented with the language detective’s challenge and they make their hypotheses about the number of languages they think they will find in their city. Afterwards, they dig into a model from the neighboring city to finally become language detectives of their own town and capture pictures of all the languages that coexist in there.

Learning objectives

exploring LL, a broad understanding of LL, raising awareness of language diversity, placing one’s own language experiences in the context of LL & experiencing LL.

Step by step activity description

Step 1. Introduction to the Linguistic Landscape concept

The teacher starts reviewing some ideas from the previous session that emerged with the Lennon Wall activity. This quick revision is helpful to introduce the Linguistic Landscape as a field of exploration and as a source of authentic language input. Then, the introduction of the LL term is done through the analysis of the words and a discussion guided with questions that are presented in the slides.

Step 2. Presenting the Language Detectives challenge & making own hypothesis!

Afterwards, the teacher presents the role of Language Detectives and the challenge to the students and makes sure that all have understood what they are meant to do and answers possible doubts. Finally, each student writes down in a piece of paper their hypothesis using the language support from the speech bubble.

Step 3. Looking at Sant Cugat’s Linguistic Landscape

A model of pictures from Sant Cugat’s Linguistic Landscape is presented to the students in order to offer them an example of what they are expected to do with the challenge. They will have a look at the photos and answer two questions in pairs: (1) How many languages can you find in these pictures? (2) How many pictures have the text or part of the text in English? These questions are useful at this stage because allow us to start introducing some key ideas such as the strong presence of English.

Step 4. Becoming Language Detectives!

Now it is time for the learners to carry out the research! They are asked to go around their city and look for languages and linguistic signs. To collect the data they have to use a camera and take a picture of

those linguistic texts. The challenge is to find as many languages as possible. However, a minimum of 3 pictures is determined for those students who may have any kind of difficulties to collect the data. The deadline would be set up for session 4, which means that they will have the weekend to go around the city and take the pictures.

Possible adaptations

This activity can easily be carried out in any other city. However, if the language used is the foreign language of the pupils, it will require detailed and thorough adaptation to their level and needs.

To be acquired competencies/ skills

Language:

writing
speaking
recognizing other languages

Subject knowledge:

Society and coexistence diversity of languages and cultures

21st-century skills and critical thinking:

Reflection, citizenship

Required competencies/ skills

Language:

listening
recognizing other languages

Subject knowledge:

Society and coexistence diversity of languages and cultures

21st-century skills and critical thinking:

Reflection

Feedback

Examples of implementation

Reaction/ feedback teacher

It was amazing to see how enthusiastic the students were to explore the languages in their city! On the other hand, it was very interesting to see how different were their hypotheses about the number of languages they thought they would find in their city. Some students were expecting a high number and diversity while others were just thinking about the three they knew: Spanish, Catalan and English.

Reaction/ feedback student

In general, the students were very participative and involved themselves in the different tasks. They enjoyed a lot looking at Sant Cugat’s Linguistic Landscape model and they shared a wide diversity of hypotheses about the challenge they were about to start. One of the most common feedback they gave was about how much they enjoyed looking at their city with the language detective glasses. They discovered things they had never realized before!

Analysis of our city’s Linguistic Landscape

Targeted age group

Duration

Materials and Resources

Grouping

Teaching Approaches

Activity Location

Interdisciplinary links

primary education (9-10)

1 hour

Google Slides Presentation. Lesson 4. Analysis of the Linguistic Landscape Photos. (computer and projector)

Cooperative group’s LL pictures.

Researcher’s Portfolio page 12.

Language support to answer and discuss the data analysis.

Classroom timer & class dojo

cooperative groups

discussion reflection analysis mediation

in school

history geography language courses

Activity summary (max. 50 words)

The activity is aimed at developing the fourth step of a social research: the analysis of pictures that the students had taken in their city. They carry out the analysis in their cooperative groups through the guidance of some questions, and then, will be able to start drawing their first interpretations of the information collected.

Learning objectives

exploring LL - a broad understanding of LL - raising awareness of language diversity - placing one’s own language experiences in the context of LL - experiencing LL

Step by step activity description

Step 1. Reading and comprehension of the analysis questions.

With the support of the digital board the teacher projects the cards and presents the analysis questions. In addition, the students also have them on page 12 from their Researcher’s Portfolio. Altogether, read the questions one by one and discuss which their meaning. Afterwards, the teacher presents the instructions for the data analysis in groups. Each group receives one card, and they have 8 minutes to

complete the task. They have to use the language support to provide the answer and then, they have to write it down on page 12 from the Researcher’s Portfolio. The timekeeper from group 2 starts setting the timer. When the bomb timer explodes, the teacher provides each group with the next question and they have to do the same as in the first round.

Step 2. Sharing the answers and discussing

When the time is up, it is time to share the answers of the analysis with the different groups in order to compare and contrast opinions about the research. The teacher mediates the conversation in order to promote the discussion of ideas and conceptions about the presence of the multiplicity of languages in their environment.

Possible adaptations

This activity can easily be carried out in any other city. However, if the language used is the foreign language of the pupils, it will require detailed and thorough adaptation to their level and needs.

To be acquired competencies/ skills

Language:

writing, reading, speaking and recognizing other languages

Subject knowledge: Society and coexistence diversity of cultures

21st-century skills and critical thinking:

Reflection, citizenship

Required competencies/ skills

Language:

Listening, writing, reading, speaking and recognizing other languages

Subject knowledge: Society and coexistence diversity of cultures

21st-century skills and critical thinking:

Reflection

Feedback

Examples of implementation

Reaction/ feedback teacher

With this activity and with the involvement and reflections of the students I totally felt that getting out of the comfort zone, launching a project in cooperative group and guiding the learners through a social research is extremely worth it. The involvement they demonstrated, how enthusiastic they were looking at their pictures and analysing them is priceless, whether they answered 1, 2, or all the programmed questions.

Reaction/ feedback student

The students were super excited looking at the LL pictures they took in their city. They came up with powerful interpretations such as the fact that the migration of people from other countries resulted in these languages also becoming part of the streets of their city. In addition, regarding the role of English they realized that not all the texts they found were due to a migration of people from an English speaking country, but that on the contrary, because this was the most known language and because, as they claimed, things in English sound cool.


Consortium Meeting



1st outline training week (UAB

Plans for the 3rd training week coming together


The 3rd training week, to be hosted by the UAB, is beginning to take shape! We now have 3 accepted speakers:

Gabriela Prego, Frank Monaghan and Osman Solmaz will be joining us for the week-long online training to be held the week of 21-25 of February 2022. We have a fourth invited speaker (Maria Castro, young author and teacher) who has yet to confirm her participation. Our intended objectives are to 1) present and pilot the tools now available in the project for input and to potentially generate more materials; 2) explore a more interdisciplinary focus of LL that covers not only language education but other areas of learner interests (e.g. sports, art, etc.).

Finalizing of OTW

We've got our webpage up and running, we've advertised and are starting to get enrolment! This promises to be a very exciting OTW.

Click on the image below to go the website:


output

previous

Homepage

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

Link coming soon!

Fascinating interview with a young teacher who despite her lack of experience shows a profound knowledge of pedagogical aspects needed for a successful LL project!


Introduction:

Welcome to the podcast series of the LOCALL project, where teachers and students share their experience working with linguistic landscapes inside and beyond the classroom walls. Hope you enjoy.


Interviewer:

Okay. Hello. Hello Laura. We're here today with Laura Capdevilla, who is a teacher at Saltells school in Catalonia, and she has very graciously agreed to answer a few questions about her experience with linguistic landscaping. So thank you so much, Laura, for joining us.


Laura:

Thank you. You, my pleasure to be here. Thanks for inviting me.


Interviewer:

We're really excited about hearing what you have to say. So, um, let's start with a question a little bit about your experience. Uh, this was your first time with linguistic landscapes and as part of teaching, can you explain why you were interested in trying it with your students?


Laura:

Yes. Well, I must say that from the very first time I was introduced to the field of Linguistic Landscaping, which was in a third year, a subject, um, called school language project and plurilingualism, I quickly became interested in how much information could be obtained merely by observing, um, the languages present in one's city. So when I came across to the topic, uh, again in practicum four, I thought that maybe it was the right time to launch myself into it. So basically I would say that, uh, it is a field, uh, with great potential to bring to the school as it allowed us to cover many aspects that are very necessary nowadays. And definitely, I can say that the top three reasons that convinced me the most were, uh, first the fact of giving the learners the opportunity to live a different learning experience. Secondly, the idea of taking the classroom out of the school that is to say that the learners, um, could learn about their neighborhood and their city and thus we could make the learning more meaningful for them. And finally, um, the opportunity for them to carry out an investigation under possibilities for them to develop, um, observation and critical thinking skills.


Interviewer:

All excellent answers and excellent reasons for trying this out with your students, which brings me to a second question. Uh, we haven't specified to the audience, what age group you were working with. Linguistic landscapes are often is used more for a secondary students, older students, but I believe you were using it with primary ed students. What age groups were your student?


Laura:

I was working with two groups of 25 students between nine and 10 years. So that is fourth grade of primary education.


Interviewer:

That's pretty young.


Laura: That is yeah. Yeah, yeah.


Interviewer:

So with that idea with working with the young learners on linguistic landscapes, uh, how did you introduce the concept of linguistic landscapes to them and how did they react when you introduced it?


Laura:

Yes, well, uh, first of all, um, the project was composed by 10 sessions and my idea was to the devote the first two to the introduction of the project itself and the concept of linguistic landscape. So in the first lesson I introduced the concept of language and I asked the students the two driving questions of the project, which were, why do we learn languages? And why do we learn English at school? And then altogether they created their Lennon wall, um, giving their opinions on those questions. And I must say that they were very engaged with the activity and many powerful ideas came up. And then it was in the second lesson. When I introduced the concept of linguistic landscape itself and to do it we analyzed both words in order to guess what it could be. And afterwards I presented the challenge, um, that they had as language detectives, which was how many languages do you think you can find in your city? And then, uh, they made their individual hypothesis and finally the last step to introduce a concept, uh, was, uh, presenting a model of my city linguistic landscape and they they did an activity on that.


Interviewer:

Excellent. So you had them break it down and think about what the word linguistic and landscape means, which for fourth graders is not, not common words for English as a foreign language classroom. Right. Very interesting.


Laura:

That's it, yeah.


Interviewer:

And then you had them, you told them they were going to be language detectives that's fun.


Laura:

Exactly. Exactly. Yeah.


Interviewer:

And so they reacted very, they were engaged from day one.


Laura:

Yes. They were thinking on putting on their language, detective glasses and they were really engaged. Yes.


Interviewer:

Excellent. Great. Um, so you've, you've already answered this question, but I think maybe it could be of interest if you could go into a bit more detail for people who are listening, other teachers who might be interested in doing this, you've already kind of sketched out some of the ideas of what you did with the language detectives and whatnot, but, um, can you briefly outline some of the activities you did during your project?


Laura:

Sure. Yes. Um, the sequence of the session was organized, uh, following the steps of a social research. So we started with the Lennon wall activity in which they gave their first answers to the initial questions of the project. And then in the second session, um, the language detectives' challenge was posed and they made their hypothesis. Then when we moved, uh, to the next stage, when, when they collected the data and they had a little more than a week, uh, to check the pictures of the languages present in the city. And afterwards we analyzed the data by answering some questions. And then in lesson five, uh, we interpreted through, through a bit of debate. And finally, in the following session, uh, they drew their conclusions by refuting or validating the hypothesis and, well, uh, the last four lessons where they voted basically to the creation of their city's linguistic landscape brochures, and, the preparation of the oral presentations and the presentations themselves.


Interviewer:

Okay. So, uh, in one of the sessions, you said session three, that they collected the data. Did you, was this outside of the class or did you go as a class into the street?


Laura:

It was outside of the class. So with their families.


Interviewer:

So you had informed beforehand to the families.


Laura:

Exactly. Yes. We sent an email to the families and they did the task together.


Interviewer:

So, um, I've seen the output, but the people who, um, that are listening our listeners, they're not familiar with it, like I am. You did this beautiful thing with the students that created brochures of what they found. And then you uploaded this on a virtual website. Um, maybe you want to explain a little bit more about how you had them then do a recorded presentations, I think without having seen the output, uh, you just kind of skipped over this very wonderful part. So could you explain that a bit?


Laura:

Yes of course. Um, they created their brochures, uh, with the results of their, of their findings on the research of the linguistic landscape. And then I created a virtual museum with their brochures. So they, they explained over there, um, the results, what they loved, what they enjoyed the most, and they shared opinions. And then we shared these virtual world with the families, with the school so that everyone could have a look to the, to the research they've done.


Interviewer:

Yeah. And I just wanted you to highlight that because you kind of, you kind of skipped over and it was such a nice output considering we'll, we'll, we'll put this, uh, link, if we have permission, we can put a link to the webpage on this podcast. So thank you for that. Um, so this was your first time.. Which activities did you like best as a teacher?


Laura:

Definitely um, the activities I enjoyed the most were the ones in which the students were actively involved and they were the main agents of their learning. And I especially loved the one in which they did their group presentations. It was very exciting and rewarding for me to see their learning from the project and the research on the linguistic landscape of Cerdanyola.


Interviewer:

Okay, so as a teacher, that was your favorite one, seeing what they had learnt, what do you think as students ... what do you think that they liked the best?


Laura:

I think that the ones they liked the best were also the ones in which they were the main, the main agents. They, they were, uh, participating, for instance, uh, in lesson four, they were sharing their pictures, analyzing them, the ones in which they took part and were involved, they enjoyed them a lot.


Interviewer:

Yeah. That's excellent. Uh, an excellent overview and an excellent perspective for other teachers. So you, you're saying they need to really be engaged.


Laura:

Of course, that's key.


Interviewer:

So, um, what does em- This is what I asked you, what you felt like they enjoyed the most, what you enjoyed the most. What do you think are the most important points that your students learnt from this experience? I mean, you, you're saying that you enjoyed hearing about what they learnt. For you, what would be the most important or most relevant points that they've learnt?


Laura:

Well there's a lot to say, but I would say that first of all, they have understood what social research means and which are the steps that are implied. And in relation to the linguistic landscape field, they have demonstrated an understanding of the multilingual character of their city and of the considerable presence of English indeed. And they have developed reflections that are so powerful on the reasons for this high presence of English, such as, um, because it's the universal language, uh, because science in English sounds sound better. So they come up with these idea of coolness, um, because of the, of the number of foreigners that now is higher than some, some years ago. And, uh, all this has led them to better understanding the importance of learning this language. And they have made numerous reflections on what learning English brings to them. So for example, they said, uh, meeting people from other cultures, um, traveling, uh, being able to understand foreigners and even having a better job opportunity. So in short, I strongly believe that this project has broadened their perspectives on the coexistence of different languages and cultures in their city. Uh, since at the very beginning of the project, when they made their hypothesis, they thought they would find three languages. So Catalan, Spanish and English, and by the end of the project, they concluded that, uh, Cerdanyola is a multilingual city in which English is highly present. So that's really powerful.


Interviewer:

Yes. And that's uh deep thinking for fourth graders as well. Congratulations on, on, on orienting them towards such, uh, excellent, uh, and deep research thoughts. Yeah. It says a lot about your capabilities as a teacher as well. Um, so, okay. This is what your students learnt from the experience. Uh, what about you, because this was your first time using linguistic landscapes in your teaching. So did you learn anything, uh, as a teacher?


Laura:

Yeah. Um, above all, um, the most relevant learning I have had from my experience has been to discover the extraordinary capacity of the students to reflect on the coexistence of different cultures and languages, the reason, uh, as, as well, the reason, um, for their presence in their immediate, immediate context and the importance of, of learning more from them. So I have definitely experienced first hand the potential of the linguistic landscape field and the opportunities that it has in the classroom.


Interviewer:

Right. Very good points. And perhaps I would highlight one that you didn't say it directly, but sometimes we underestimate our students. Do we not? So in a way you're saying you, you realize that, um, we always, we need to be reminded to never underestimate our students.


Laura:

It's the Pygmalion effect, right? Yes.


Interviewer:

Exactly. So looking back, is there anything that you would do differently?


Laura:

Yes. Yes. I think always we can improve something and for further applications, I would probably like to devote more time to the group work of preparing the presentation of their research results. Since I think that the step of sharing what you have discovered is extremely relevant, uh, for their learning process. And this requires a good preparation that allows them to gain confidence to orally present it. So I would devote more time to this part.


Interviewer:

Good point. Very good point. I know we've covered a lot of ground, but is there any point or anything that you would highlight about linguistic landscapes and teaching that we haven't mentioned yet?


Laura:

Well, basically I would say that it is a field of study that provides a very large input for students and meets all the requirements to lead a meaningful and motivating learning experience for them.


Interviewer:

Okay. Nice point. Right. For everyone who's out there listening to our podcasts, which I hope will be many, many potential linguistic landscape teachers. Uh, what would you tell other teachers who are looking into this idea of implementing linguistic landscapes with their students? Do you have some tips or anything you would share with them?


Laura:

Yeah, I would definitely tell them that it's worth it to give it a try. I must say that at the beginning, uh, I needed a little extra time to gain a deeper insight into the field and feel confident enough to bring the linguistic landscaping into the classroom, but the benefits that it has for (...) for one as a teacher and for the learners are priceless. I mean, you have a natural and genuine opportunity to bring to the classroom issues as important today as globalization, linguistic imperialism, multilingualism, and multiculturalism, or diversity. So, um, all this being worked from a student centered approach in which they are the ones carrying out a social research it's it's, it's great. What can you say? So, uh, I highly recommend it to all those teachers who also believe that this is valuable enough to be integrated into the, into the classroom.


Interviewer:

Oh, thank you. Thank you for those words. Um, very inspiring, very inspiring words. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with our listeners? Any points that we haven't covered? I'm sure there's a lot, but perhaps there's something ...


Laura:

There's especially one I would like to, to emphasize that is, um, the last aspect implicit in the project was, uh, the participation and implication of the families. And, uh, with the language detectives' challenge, there was an opportunity for parents and children to investigate more about their city together and to be engaged in the investigation of their children. This was a very good experience for many of them. And they, in fact, sent us emails expressing their excitement for being able to contribute to their, uh, children's, uh, learning processes. So that's one more reason to give this field of linguistic landscape a chance.


Interviewer:

Wow, that's so empowering. Um, it's absolutely fantastic that the parents were so responsive and in a, in a positive way with what you were doing. That must have been an absolutely fantastic feeling to get those emails.


Laura:

Yes. Yes. Because you see that the work you're doing is worthy.


Interviewer:

Yes. Yes. Well, thank you, Laura. Thank you very much for joining us for this podcast. Uh, you've explained a wonderful experience, and as I've said, we will make the output for your, uh, of your students, uh, linguistic landscape products as language detectives we'll make that available if we have permission from your school to do so. And it's, it's been delightful to hear about your experience. Thank you so much.


Laura: Thank you. My pleasure.


Closing narrative:

Thank you for listening. Please stay tuned to our website and YouTube channel. New and inspiring podcasts are coming soon.


If you'd like to see the students' linguistic landscapes in a 3D gallery, go here.

After the success of the TEPE conference, Mónica and Klaudia are ready for another conference experience! We've just submitted an abstract to the ICERI Seville 2021 conference. Fingers crossed it's accepted!



UAB Events (vi)

OTW launched

Mónica López has created two more podcasts for the UAB team! She has interviewed her students to get some insight into their perspectives on the homescapes. Some great insights from these young language learners. Listen to them out here!





21/02/22

25/02/22

18/03/22

22-24/06/22

09/06/22

17/06/22

OTW Finalized!

Intensive online training week - 21 participants who made it all the way to the end.

Here's the summary of what we have done:




Consortium meeting

(Online Consortium Meeting):





On-line team meeting

March 18th 2022

10 am – 12 am (GMT +1)

Zoom: https://uni-hamburg.zoom.us/j/7615637791

TOP

  • development of IO5 (Guidelines)

Sílvia (coord.)

11.30 – 11.50

Fifth training week: discussion about timeframe, format (on-line/ in local) and tasks; Dissemination event in Hamburg.

Lisa, Sarah & Silvia

11.50 – 12.00

Au revoir & scheduling meetings (June 2022?) 





To do:

See if anyone has any TFGs or MAs that are related to LL

Update Timesheets

Send training week attendance list to be signed

Translate modules

2 games done in Spanish: Chinese (ask my MA students if they are interested in helping) / Arabic in Barcelona

Make arrangements for Multiplier Event

Check list for creating/translating modules, podcasts and tutorials


ELLME Conference


Mapping our world: Gamified linguistic Landscaping with young learners

Dr. Melinda Dooly (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain)

Dr. Emilee Moore (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain)


For language educators working with children, current challenges associated with local and global problems go far beyond language teaching, including how to instil basic respect for human diversity. This presentation will discuss the EU funded project LOCALL, which has created a digital app for gamified documentation of linguistic landscapes. The app is used to raise young language learners' awareness of plurilingual issues such as why some languages are more (in)visible than others and to provide a platform for discussion about linguistic and cultural diversity in their immediate environment. This talk will first provide an overview of the app and supporting materials for Linguistic Landscapes in educational contexts before discussing the piloting of the app with preservice teachers. The participants' interpretation of the pedagogical potential of the app, along with insight into their understanding of the importance of promoting plurilingual awareness through tools such as this one will be discussed.



Participation in Hamburg OTW

UAB LOCALL teacher team members, Klaudia Kruszynska and Mónica López, take part in the Online Training Week organized by Hamburg.



Participation in Hamburg ME

UAB LOCALL team member, Melinda Dooly, presents the IO 3 (led by UAB team) in the Hamburg partner Multiplier Event.




output

previous

Homepage

We've officially kicked off our online training week, hosted by Barcelona! 42 registered participants!



Link coming soon!

Fascinating interview with a young teacher who despite her lack of experience shows a profound knowledge of pedagogical aspects needed for a successful LL project!


Introduction:

Welcome to the podcast series of the LOCALL project, where teachers and students share their experience working with linguistic landscapes inside and beyond the classroom walls. Hope you enjoy.


Interviewer:

Okay. Hello. Hello Laura. We're here today with Laura Capdevilla, who is a teacher at Saltells school in Catalonia, and she has very graciously agreed to answer a few questions about her experience with linguistic landscaping. So thank you so much, Laura, for joining us.


Laura:

Thank you. You, my pleasure to be here. Thanks for inviting me.


Interviewer:

We're really excited about hearing what you have to say. So, um, let's start with a question a little bit about your experience. Uh, this was your first time with linguistic landscapes and as part of teaching, can you explain why you were interested in trying it with your students?


Laura:

Yes. Well, I must say that from the very first time I was introduced to the field of Linguistic Landscaping, which was in a third year, a subject, um, called school language project and plurilingualism, I quickly became interested in how much information could be obtained merely by observing, um, the languages present in one's city. So when I came across to the topic, uh, again in practicum four, I thought that maybe it was the right time to launch myself into it. So basically I would say that, uh, it is a field, uh, with great potential to bring to the school as it allowed us to cover many aspects that are very necessary nowadays. And definitely, I can say that the top three reasons that convinced me the most were, uh, first the fact of giving the learners the opportunity to live a different learning experience. Secondly, the idea of taking the classroom out of the school that is to say that the learners, um, could learn about their neighborhood and their city and thus we could make the learning more meaningful for them. And finally, um, the opportunity for them to carry out an investigation under possibilities for them to develop, um, observation and critical thinking skills.


Interviewer:

All excellent answers and excellent reasons for trying this out with your students, which brings me to a second question. Uh, we haven't specified to the audience, what age group you were working with. Linguistic landscapes are often is used more for a secondary students, older students, but I believe you were using it with primary ed students. What age groups were your student?


Laura:

I was working with two groups of 25 students between nine and 10 years. So that is fourth grade of primary education.


Interviewer:

That's pretty young.


Laura: That is yeah. Yeah, yeah.


Interviewer:

So with that idea with working with the young learners on linguistic landscapes, uh, how did you introduce the concept of linguistic landscapes to them and how did they react when you introduced it?


Laura:

Yes, well, uh, first of all, um, the project was composed by 10 sessions and my idea was to the devote the first two to the introduction of the project itself and the concept of linguistic landscape. So in the first lesson I introduced the concept of language and I asked the students the two driving questions of the project, which were, why do we learn languages? And why do we learn English at school? And then altogether they created their Lennon wall, um, giving their opinions on those questions. And I must say that they were very engaged with the activity and many powerful ideas came up. And then it was in the second lesson. When I introduced the concept of linguistic landscape itself and to do it we analyzed both words in order to guess what it could be. And afterwards I presented the challenge, um, that they had as language detectives, which was how many languages do you think you can find in your city? And then, uh, they made their individual hypothesis and finally the last step to introduce a concept, uh, was, uh, presenting a model of my city linguistic landscape and they they did an activity on that.


Interviewer:

Excellent. So you had them break it down and think about what the word linguistic and landscape means, which for fourth graders is not, not common words for English as a foreign language classroom. Right. Very interesting.


Laura:

That's it, yeah.


Interviewer:

And then you had them, you told them they were going to be language detectives that's fun.


Laura:

Exactly. Exactly. Yeah.


Interviewer:

And so they reacted very, they were engaged from day one.


Laura:

Yes. They were thinking on putting on their language, detective glasses and they were really engaged. Yes.


Interviewer:

Excellent. Great. Um, so you've, you've already answered this question, but I think maybe it could be of interest if you could go into a bit more detail for people who are listening, other teachers who might be interested in doing this, you've already kind of sketched out some of the ideas of what you did with the language detectives and whatnot, but, um, can you briefly outline some of the activities you did during your project?


Laura:

Sure. Yes. Um, the sequence of the session was organized, uh, following the steps of a social research. So we started with the Lennon wall activity in which they gave their first answers to the initial questions of the project. And then in the second session, um, the language detectives' challenge was posed and they made their hypothesis. Then when we moved, uh, to the next stage, when, when they collected the data and they had a little more than a week, uh, to check the pictures of the languages present in the city. And afterwards we analyzed the data by answering some questions. And then in lesson five, uh, we interpreted through, through a bit of debate. And finally, in the following session, uh, they drew their conclusions by refuting or validating the hypothesis and, well, uh, the last four lessons where they voted basically to the creation of their city's linguistic landscape brochures, and, the preparation of the oral presentations and the presentations themselves.


Interviewer:

Okay. So, uh, in one of the sessions, you said session three, that they collected the data. Did you, was this outside of the class or did you go as a class into the street?


Laura:

It was outside of the class. So with their families.


Interviewer:

So you had informed beforehand to the families.


Laura:

Exactly. Yes. We sent an email to the families and they did the task together.


Interviewer:

So, um, I've seen the output, but the people who, um, that are listening our listeners, they're not familiar with it, like I am. You did this beautiful thing with the students that created brochures of what they found. And then you uploaded this on a virtual website. Um, maybe you want to explain a little bit more about how you had them then do a recorded presentations, I think without having seen the output, uh, you just kind of skipped over this very wonderful part. So could you explain that a bit?


Laura:

Yes of course. Um, they created their brochures, uh, with the results of their, of their findings on the research of the linguistic landscape. And then I created a virtual museum with their brochures. So they, they explained over there, um, the results, what they loved, what they enjoyed the most, and they shared opinions. And then we shared these virtual world with the families, with the school so that everyone could have a look to the, to the research they've done.


Interviewer:

Yeah. And I just wanted you to highlight that because you kind of, you kind of skipped over and it was such a nice output considering we'll, we'll, we'll put this, uh, link, if we have permission, we can put a link to the webpage on this podcast. So thank you for that. Um, so this was your first time.. Which activities did you like best as a teacher?


Laura:

Definitely um, the activities I enjoyed the most were the ones in which the students were actively involved and they were the main agents of their learning. And I especially loved the one in which they did their group presentations. It was very exciting and rewarding for me to see their learning from the project and the research on the linguistic landscape of Cerdanyola.


Interviewer:

Okay, so as a teacher, that was your favorite one, seeing what they had learnt, what do you think as students ... what do you think that they liked the best?


Laura:

I think that the ones they liked the best were also the ones in which they were the main, the main agents. They, they were, uh, participating, for instance, uh, in lesson four, they were sharing their pictures, analyzing them, the ones in which they took part and were involved, they enjoyed them a lot.


Interviewer:

Yeah. That's excellent. Uh, an excellent overview and an excellent perspective for other teachers. So you, you're saying they need to really be engaged.


Laura:

Of course, that's key.


Interviewer:

So, um, what does em- This is what I asked you, what you felt like they enjoyed the most, what you enjoyed the most. What do you think are the most important points that your students learnt from this experience? I mean, you, you're saying that you enjoyed hearing about what they learnt. For you, what would be the most important or most relevant points that they've learnt?


Laura:

Well there's a lot to say, but I would say that first of all, they have understood what social research means and which are the steps that are implied. And in relation to the linguistic landscape field, they have demonstrated an understanding of the multilingual character of their city and of the considerable presence of English indeed. And they have developed reflections that are so powerful on the reasons for this high presence of English, such as, um, because it's the universal language, uh, because science in English sounds sound better. So they come up with these idea of coolness, um, because of the, of the number of foreigners that now is higher than some, some years ago. And, uh, all this has led them to better understanding the importance of learning this language. And they have made numerous reflections on what learning English brings to them. So for example, they said, uh, meeting people from other cultures, um, traveling, uh, being able to understand foreigners and even having a better job opportunity. So in short, I strongly believe that this project has broadened their perspectives on the coexistence of different languages and cultures in their city. Uh, since at the very beginning of the project, when they made their hypothesis, they thought they would find three languages. So Catalan, Spanish and English, and by the end of the project, they concluded that, uh, Cerdanyola is a multilingual city in which English is highly present. So that's really powerful.


Interviewer:

Yes. And that's uh deep thinking for fourth graders as well. Congratulations on, on, on orienting them towards such, uh, excellent, uh, and deep research thoughts. Yeah. It says a lot about your capabilities as a teacher as well. Um, so, okay. This is what your students learnt from the experience. Uh, what about you, because this was your first time using linguistic landscapes in your teaching. So did you learn anything, uh, as a teacher?


Laura:

Yeah. Um, above all, um, the most relevant learning I have had from my experience has been to discover the extraordinary capacity of the students to reflect on the coexistence of different cultures and languages, the reason, uh, as, as well, the reason, um, for their presence in their immediate, immediate context and the importance of, of learning more from them. So I have definitely experienced first hand the potential of the linguistic landscape field and the opportunities that it has in the classroom.


Interviewer:

Right. Very good points. And perhaps I would highlight one that you didn't say it directly, but sometimes we underestimate our students. Do we not? So in a way you're saying you, you realize that, um, we always, we need to be reminded to never underestimate our students.


Laura:

It's the Pygmalion effect, right? Yes.


Interviewer:

Exactly. So looking back, is there anything that you would do differently?


Laura:

Yes. Yes. I think always we can improve something and for further applications, I would probably like to devote more time to the group work of preparing the presentation of their research results. Since I think that the step of sharing what you have discovered is extremely relevant, uh, for their learning process. And this requires a good preparation that allows them to gain confidence to orally present it. So I would devote more time to this part.


Interviewer:

Good point. Very good point. I know we've covered a lot of ground, but is there any point or anything that you would highlight about linguistic landscapes and teaching that we haven't mentioned yet?


Laura:

Well, basically I would say that it is a field of study that provides a very large input for students and meets all the requirements to lead a meaningful and motivating learning experience for them.


Interviewer:

Okay. Nice point. Right. For everyone who's out there listening to our podcasts, which I hope will be many, many potential linguistic landscape teachers. Uh, what would you tell other teachers who are looking into this idea of implementing linguistic landscapes with their students? Do you have some tips or anything you would share with them?


Laura:

Yeah, I would definitely tell them that it's worth it to give it a try. I must say that at the beginning, uh, I needed a little extra time to gain a deeper insight into the field and feel confident enough to bring the linguistic landscaping into the classroom, but the benefits that it has for (...) for one as a teacher and for the learners are priceless. I mean, you have a natural and genuine opportunity to bring to the classroom issues as important today as globalization, linguistic imperialism, multilingualism, and multiculturalism, or diversity. So, um, all this being worked from a student centered approach in which they are the ones carrying out a social research it's it's, it's great. What can you say? So, uh, I highly recommend it to all those teachers who also believe that this is valuable enough to be integrated into the, into the classroom.


Interviewer:

Oh, thank you. Thank you for those words. Um, very inspiring, very inspiring words. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with our listeners? Any points that we haven't covered? I'm sure there's a lot, but perhaps there's something ...


Laura:

There's especially one I would like to, to emphasize that is, um, the last aspect implicit in the project was, uh, the participation and implication of the families. And, uh, with the language detectives' challenge, there was an opportunity for parents and children to investigate more about their city together and to be engaged in the investigation of their children. This was a very good experience for many of them. And they, in fact, sent us emails expressing their excitement for being able to contribute to their, uh, children's, uh, learning processes. So that's one more reason to give this field of linguistic landscape a chance.


Interviewer:

Wow, that's so empowering. Um, it's absolutely fantastic that the parents were so responsive and in a, in a positive way with what you were doing. That must have been an absolutely fantastic feeling to get those emails.


Laura:

Yes. Yes. Because you see that the work you're doing is worthy.


Interviewer:

Yes. Yes. Well, thank you, Laura. Thank you very much for joining us for this podcast. Uh, you've explained a wonderful experience, and as I've said, we will make the output for your, uh, of your students, uh, linguistic landscape products as language detectives we'll make that available if we have permission from your school to do so. And it's, it's been delightful to hear about your experience. Thank you so much.


Laura: Thank you. My pleasure.


Closing narrative:

Thank you for listening. Please stay tuned to our website and YouTube channel. New and inspiring podcasts are coming soon.


If you'd like to see the students' linguistic landscapes in a 3D gallery, go here.

After the success of the TEPE conference, Mónica and Klaudia are ready for another conference experience! We've just submitted an abstract to the ICERI Seville 2021 conference. Fingers crossed it's accepted!



Intellectual Outputs

ALL training events now completed

Each local partner is in charge of setting up some training events based on topics related to our main output.


For more information about the training weeks held by other partners, go to the project webpage.



Tutorials and Podcasts Library

Mandate:


Create a section in the platform for tutorials and pod-casts regarding the integration of multilingual landscapes in language education. These may include small videos from classroom practices, evaluation by the students, interviews with teachers and teacher trainers, linguistic landscapes paths through the different contexts and analysis of particular linguistic landscapes features.


These formative documents with register of good practices and will be permanently available.

Comment features will be available on the platform.


IO3, led by UAB, will create a guideline to the production of these materials.

  • These will be commented on and followed by the partner institutions.
  • These guidelines to the production of tutorials and pod-casts are expected to achieve a certain uniformity across the creations and will include instructions on: structure, media and their combination, multimodality and multilingualism, ethical principles in the collection, edition and publication of material, as well as other matters considered necessary to assure the quality of all the resources produced. A common introduction and final credits sequences will be agreed upon.


Note: connection to telecollaboration is desirable but is still to be conceptualised (ie: is there a possibility to link schools and teachers participating in the project and include their interactions in T & P?)


First prototypes & guidelines for tutorials and podcasts completed in March 2021 by UAB team.

App

Mandate:


App for mobile linguistic Landscapes learning (led by Aveiro)


This App will include: i) a discovery quiz (questions will be co-created by students, teachers and teacher educators participating in the project), with different levels; ii) virtual linguistic paths co-created by the participants; iii) links to social media information about the multilingual education and the use of LL in teaching and learning; iv) using geolocation tools and camera, examples of linguistic landscapes, written or orally commented by the partner institutions and/or by the users; v) notifications on new data or comments being uploaded. This App can be downloaded from the platform of the project and may be integrated in the modules (IO2) and in the creation of “Tutorials and Podcasts” (IO3).


Steps:
- design of interface and structure;
- discussion of these elements with partner teachers, students and student teachers;
- adjustments to the initial plan;
- creation of the discovery quiz, including elements of the linguistic landscapes of the partner
institutions and cities;
- creation from linguistic path, with elements collected by students and teachers;
- implementation of a beta-version;
- test of the beta-version;
- implementation of improvement suggestions;
- translation of the App in the different languages of the project;
- dissemination of final version.


Notes from 1st meeting: the APP should be designed collaboratively by students and teachers and include a quiz, linguistic paths (facilitated by geolocation tools) and videos with local linguistic communities. 5 stages of APP development were presented: creation (including comparison with other Apps), design of the prototype (which will combine open and close features); content development (and its integration in the App); Beta testing (and subsequent implementation of improvements); and Dissemination (through the project Platform and other channels, such as partners’ networks). The Beta Version is planned to be presented in the local dissemination event in Aveiro. Further ideas discussed: the dashboard/template should allow personalisation and the quality control should allow the following actions: edit, remove and publish. Also peer control of the quality should be assured. Beta testing could be carried on by local teams, in a number of classes and institutions still to be defined.


Example: Edupark http://edupark.web.ua.pt/


First prototype app & video tutorials for use completed in February 2021 by Aveiro team.


Guidelines: introducing linguistic
landscapes in language learning and teacher
education

Following an internal “evaluation report”, a set of recommendations for teachers and teacher
educators, raising awareness about the added-value of discussing language learning and language
learning strategies in a broader context of linguistic and cultural diversity. Additionally, concrete
examples and practices will be included alongside recommendations.


This IO will be coordinated by the University of Hamburg, and will include an analysis of quantitative and qualitative data collected through the implementation and evaluation of the previous Intellectual Outputs.

It will take the form of a E-book to be made available in the website of the project and shorter versions of these recommendation will be disseminated in multiplication events and directly
by partner institutions (teacher training institutions, schools, associations dealing with multilingualism, multilingual education, etc). Each partner institution will analyse the informations collected during implementation and evaluation of the previous Outputs and signs of impact in teacher professional development.


This product will include:
- Introduction (context, goals of the project and activities carried on);
- Evaluation of project outcomes by the participants;
- Recommendations for policy makers;
- Recommendations for teacher educators (Universities and training institutions);
- Recommendations for teachers;
- Recommendations for students.

Multiplier Events

International Teacher Training Events

IO 2

IO 3

IO 4

IO 5

MEs

(Multimodal) modules on LL for language
education

IO 2 will be carried out through the collaborative creation, implementation and assessment with and by partner schools and with prospective teachers. Parallel to the creation of these modules, also the (prospective) teachers’ report on their integration will be made available. These resources will be accessible online, in the platform of the project and discussion forums will be created in order to favor the exchange of experiences.


The will be elaborated in the different contexts (countries), coordinated by the University of Groningen. Each partner institution will work collaboratively with secondary schools announced in this application in order to create the materials.

The materials will be made available in the platform of the project, after its implementation. Other materials may be created by student teachers and be implemented by them in stages or internships at school.

These materials are expected to be multilingual in content, but may be written in different languages according to the different national contexts and target audience.


The template was submitted by the Groningen team at the end March and approved by the consortium in April. The UAB team translated the template in June and is recruiting teachers to write up activities.


previous

homepage

Events

UAB ME

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

E1 UNIVERSIDADE DE AVEIRO Jornadas do LALE 10-2021
E2 UNIVERSITAET HAMBURG Tagung LI 06-2022
E3 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Groningen 09-2021
E4 UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA Barcelona 11-2021
E5 UNIVERSITE DE STRASBOURG Strasbourg 10-2021


The UAB team will offer a day and half dissemination event that will consist of talks that showcase
the main aims and outcomes of the project on the first half day. This opening session will be held on a Friday afternoon in order to ensure maximum availability to secondary and primary education
teachers (the main target audience) but will also be open to other educational stakeholders such as teacher educators and principal policy makers (local, regional and national administrators in
departments of education and similar). The second day will be a full day of workshops for teachers
and educators interested in learning about using the approach developed by the project in their own teaching practice.

Training & Multiplier Events (i)

June 10, 2020
Speak 1:
Danièle Moore

Dr. Moore has provided us with an overview of what a linguistic landscape is.

And also talked about the durability and invisibility of some languages (e.g. indigenous languages), highlighting examples of indigenous graffitti. Very insightful.

Linguistic landscape documentation can sometimes trigger notions of where the place is, but it can also be tricky. This one, for instance, is in Vancouver! And also environment can trigger the signage.

Her Japanese students for instance, did not know how to interpret EU signs for camping. So there is an issue of meaning-making and this can have an impact on the LL. LL can help us realize that our landscape has an influence on how we think about the world. For instance, a sign in Tokyo about shop hours shows that they have 27 hours in the day! Age can also affect how we create our personal Linguistic Landscapes. Adults' gaze tends to go up, children tend to look down. Linguisic landscapes can also serve a visual metaphors.


Some key ideas:



And her frame work with the acronym of PLURAL is very enlightening!




June 10, 2020
Speaker 3:
Larissa Aronin

Summary of Dr. Larissa Aronin's talk:


She first provided some definitions and some current research:




Recent advances in science have pushed the studies of language use/learning/cognition that needs to take into consideration embodiment & environment (extended mind view of cognition)


the environment of our students is replete with material artefacts and materiality, we must bring it into teaching:


Example:

Immediate reaction to an occurence (Brexit) and reaction in Russian (need to consume less - must 'eat less); displays value system:


LL are dynamic systems and can be brought into the classroom (jewelery, heritage items handed down through generations; all of these can provide social and educational encounters and provide validity to different lingual-cultural value systems). Also provide important support of individual identity. Can also be an important way to understand cultural and social positions that are dialogic in society:


LL are in both private and public spaces.


The nexus between public and private can show us a lot about communities (variety and location of languages). Provided example of display of signage & artefacts in Arabic, Hebrew, English, Circassian, Russian, Turkish)


she then discussed the importance of materiality in teaching (affectivity is very important)

Motivation, deeper understanding, emotional connection


Examples of materials used for home learning:


Tackling the question of SO WHAT?


Can help bring up discussion of how many things are misjudged; by examining the materiality of cognition.


Example of counting that highlighted contradictions and similarities:


Conclusions:


October 16, 2020
Hosted by Aveiro Partners

Jan 18-21, 2021
Hosted by Aveiro Partners


An exciting and informative week for everyone involved!

May 31-June 4, 2021
Hosted by Strasbourg Partners


International Teacher Training Event

International Teacher Training Events


International Teacher Training Events

Erasmus Day

International Teacher Training Event

International Teacher Training Event

June 10, 2020
Speaker 2:
Alice Chik

Summary of Alice Chik's talk


Demographics of population will have an impact on the linguistic landscape and language policies. For instance, in Australia the notion of plurilingualism is limited pretty much to English + 1 language. This does not reflect the everyday reality of people in Sydney.



Also interesting the consensus asks about what you speak in your 'household' but daily life can mean use of other languages outside the home.


Dr. Chik talked briefly about research background of LL that focuses on these three main strands:


Focus on texts:


This can be controversial in public spaces. For instance there was some controversy regarding a sign where English was not the most predominant text.


Focus on photography:


LL can highlight socioeconomic situations (e.g. use of Chinese in specific neighbourhoods). This can lead to statistical research on the neighbourhood.


Comparative analysis can be enlightening:


Most LL research has been done in cities but has not really be carried out much in suburbia. A lot of the multilingual signage can be found in public transport spaces (e.g. train stations).


Sometimes Italian, Spanish or Greek are 'anglicized' (e.g. the use of mostly English for Italian restaurants).


Indigenous languages are mostly visible in semi-public spaces (e.g. outside of Indigenous museums).


Interesting point about virtual LLs:


Example: education website only available in English but has link to google translate (in decided languages). Provides 'gist' of the content but sometimes it is not a very reliable translation because it is AI translation. This can become an issue considering that it is a public service website that is not meeting the needs of over 200+ language speakers (students, parents, etc.)




She also discussed the significance of which languages are chosen to be officially translated in comparison to which languages speak; also to which languages learn.


In her current research she is looking at which languages are available in public documents online.



Some preliminary results of her study:

homepage

Previous

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

E1 UNIVERSIDADE DE AVEIRO Jornadas do LALE 10-2021
E2 UNIVERSITAET HAMBURG Tagung LI 06-2022
E3 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Groningen 09-2021
E4 UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA Barcelona 11-2021
E5 UNIVERSITE DE STRASBOURG Strasbourg 10-2021


The UAB team will offer a day and half dissemination event that will consist of talks that showcase
the main aims and outcomes of the project on the first half day. This opening session will be held on a Friday afternoon in order to ensure maximum availability to secondary and primary education
teachers (the main target audience) but will also be open to other educational stakeholders such as teacher educators and principal policy makers (local, regional and national administrators in
departments of education and similar). The second day will be a full day of workshops for teachers
and educators interested in learning about using the approach developed by the project in their own teaching practice.

Training Week (UAB)

Feb 21, 2022
Kick-off & Roundtable

Today was the first day of the online training week for the LoCALL project, hosted by the GREIP team. This week's focus is on interdisciplinary perspective on Linguistic Landscapes. Today we started with a general presentation of the project, given by the IP of the project, Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer, the overview of the week, presented by Melinda Dooly and then a roundtable by two experienced teacher-researchers in LL, Lisa Brinkmann and Julia van Rosen. All in all, a great start to the week.

You can see the materials and output in the google classroom here.



Feb 23, 2022
Speaker 2:
Frank Monaghan

GREIP hosts 3rd day:

Apart from the online working groups busy creating games for the app, Dr. Frank Monaghan, from Open University, UK, delivered a a brilliant talk about 'fanslanguaging' (focused on banners made by football fans from Liverpool). With references from political identities to mentions of Bahktin and Plato, the presentation was highly informative and stimulating. Dr Monaghan's session left all of the participants with loads of new ideas and food for thought regarding innovative ways to use linguistic landscapes in our teaching.

You can see the materials and output in the google classroom here.



Feb 24, 2022
Speaker 3:
Osman Solmaz

4th day, hosted by GREIP team:

Dr. Osman Solmaz, co-editor of Linguistic Landscapes In English Language Teaching. A Pedagogical Guidebook, was our speaker for the fourth day. His engaging and at times humourous talk stimulated much participation and inspired new thoughts on how to extend LL beyond awareness to more active and interactive resources. Just one more day for the wrap up and our OTW will be finished.


You can see the materials and output in the google classroom here.



Feb 25, 2022
Wrap up!

The last day of the training week was especially interactive and fun for all the participants involved as we gave feedback and ideas on our plans for the LoCALL app and then, in smaller working groups, created 'pop-up' podcasts for the project website. Extremely insightful observations that underscored the amount of creative thinking and learning that has taken place during these intensive five days. Results stemming from the 5-day Online Training Workshop will be made available in the project website soon.


You can see the materials and output in the google classroom here.


All in all:

  • 1 Roundtable
  • 3 Keynote talks
  • 2 group work sessions to produce 3 games for the LoCALL app
  • 2 'pop-up' podcasts
  • Lots of fun and dialogue!


A fun video showing some LL from the different participant countries:




21-25 Feb 2022
Summary

International Teacher Training Event

International Teacher Training Events


International Teacher Training Events

International Teacher Training Events

International Teacher Training Event

International Teacher Training Event

Feb 22, 2022
Speaker 1:
Gabriela Prego

GREIP hosts the second day of the OTW:

Online working groups coming together to create fun LL games and an impressive presentation by our wonderful colleague, Dr. Gabriel Prego of the Universidad de Santiago at Compostela. The pace of activities is full on for the LoCALL Online Training Week.


You can see the materials and output in the google classroom here.



homepage

Previous

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.

E1 UNIVERSIDADE DE AVEIRO Jornadas do LALE 10-2021
E2 UNIVERSITAET HAMBURG Tagung LI 06-2022
E3 RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN Groningen 09-2021
E4 UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA Barcelona 11-2021
E5 UNIVERSITE DE STRASBOURG Strasbourg 10-2021


The UAB team will offer a day and half dissemination event that will consist of talks that showcase
the main aims and outcomes of the project on the first half day. This opening session will be held on a Friday afternoon in order to ensure maximum availability to secondary and primary education
teachers (the main target audience) but will also be open to other educational stakeholders such as teacher educators and principal policy makers (local, regional and national administrators in
departments of education and similar). The second day will be a full day of workshops for teachers
and educators interested in learning about using the approach developed by the project in their own teaching practice.

Multiplier Event (UAB)

July 7th 2022

Programme

4-4:10 pm: Welcome: Melinda Dooly & Mónica López

4:15-5:00 pm: Dr. Jessica Bradley: Engaging with language diversity in public spaces through creative practice

How do we experience language(s) in everyday life? How are our identities shaped through our engagements with language(s) in public space? How do people make the new from the everyday and the banal?

In this keynote I share some current ideas relating to visual arts, creative practice and linguistic landscapes (visible languages), with examples from different research projects (Bradley et al., 2015-2017; 2019-2021) which explore everyday experiences of language(s) or Spracherleben (Busch, 2012; 2014) through and with creative methods. I show a series of images of artworks created by young people working with a visual artist in response to the linguistic landscapes of Manchester, UK. Drawing on a developing framework for creative inquiry and applied linguistics (Bradley & Harvey, 2019; Harvey & Bradley, 2021), which considers language-focused research with, into and through the arts, I discuss what an arts-based approach to linguistic landscapes might look like, might be, and might bring to our understandings of everyday languaging and everyday creativity. This talk links directly to ideas I am developing with Louise Atkinson, delving into art history, art education, language education and creative inquiry in co-produced research.

Jessica Bradley is an interdisciplinary linguist, whose research spans modern languages, translation studies, applied linguistics and creative practice. She has developed and led a number of research projects which engage with the relationship between language and creative practice, including visual arts approaches to lived experiences of language (Multilingual Streets, AHRC OWRI Cross Language Dynamics) and translanguaging in street arts production and performance. She is committed to ethnographic approaches to research and collaboration with creative practitioners. Jessica is co-founder of the AILA Creative Inquiry and Applied Linguistics Research Network and co-editor of the book Translanguaging as Transformation: The Collaborative Construction of New Linguistic Realities (2020). She has also published about ethnography (2017; 2020), arts practice (2018) and creative inquiry (2019; 2021; 2022).

5:00-5:15 pm: Break

5:15-5:45 pm: Mónica López: Using linguistic landscapes to reach linguistic competence in the new curriculum

The underlying purpose of curriculum changes is to improve the quality of education for the benefit of learners and teachers. However, it can be a challenge for teachers to think of innovative ways to integrate new components of educational curriculum and to find appropriate resources to do so. This very practical talk will present and discuss ways in which linguistic landscapes can be used to meet the new distribution, in 'blocs' of the Catalan curriculum, specifically BLOC 1 connected to recognition of linguistic and dialectical varieties in Catalunya, Spain and the world. This include identifying bias and stereotypes, personal language biographies, recognition of linguistic diversity in the immediate surroundings and mapping this reality.

Mónica López is an English school teacher and adjunct professor at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. She has years of experience teaching English as foreign language, specializing in CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning) and teaching of languages through technology.

5:45-6:15 pm: Melinda Dooly: Presentation of the LOCALL project & app for gamifying linguistic landscapes

The LOCALL project aims to show teachers and learners worldwide how they can capitalize linguistic landscapes for language education by acknowledging the added-value of superdiversity around them. The project team has designed and produced materials that help foster global language education, promote commitment to linguistic diversity and lifelong learning by bringing students’ lifeworld and school multilingualism to the foreground so that they can develop a sense of belonging through active participation in multilingual and intercultural spaces. Specifically the project team offers inspirational modules to get teachers started on their own pedagogical application of linguistic landscapes, tutorials and podcasts featuring teachers around the world explaining their own experiences (in many different languages), guidelines for implementing and evaluating linguistic landscape teaching and an app for gamifying linguistic landscape adventures. These materials will be presented and explained to the participants of this multiplier event.

Melinda Dooly is Serra Húnter Full Professor, Chair in Technology-Enhanced Language & Intercultural Education in the Department of Language & Literature Education and Social Science Education at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Her principal research addresses technology-enhanced project-based language learning, intercultural communication and 21st century competences in teacher education. She is lead researcher of GREIP: Grup de Recerca en Educació, Interacció i Plurilingüisme (Research Centre for Education, Interaction and Plurilingualism).

6:15-6:30 pm: Break

6:30-7:30: Workshop: Engaging with language diversity in public spaces through creative practice led by Dr. Jessica Bradley

In this workshop participants will explore creative inquiry in the context of researching languages in public space. This is often referred to as 'Linguistic Landscapes'. The workshop will use methods and approaches from the current collaborative research project, Multilingual Streets: Translating and Curating the Linguistic Landscape. For this workshop participants will explore understandings of language as experienced in everyday life and creative methods as central to collaborative inquiry.

7:30-8:00 pm: Q & A and wrap-up

7 de juliol

Programa

16-16:10: Benvinguda: Melinda Dooly i Mónica López

16:15-17:00 pm: Dra. Jessica Bradley: Engaging with language diversity in public spaces through creative practice

Com vivim la llengua o les llengües a la vida quotidiana? Com es configuren les nostres identitats a través de les nostres interaccions amb les llengües a l'espai públic? Com es crea el nou d'el que és quotidià i banal?

En aquesta ponència comparteixo algunes idees actuals relacionades amb les arts visuals, la pràctica creativa i els paisatges lingüístics (llengües visibles), amb exemples de diferents projectes de recerca (Bradley et al., 2015-2017; 2019-2021) que exploren experiències quotidianes del llenguatge(s) o Spracherleben (Busch, 2012; 2014) mitjançant mètodes creatius. Mostro una sèrie d'imatges d'obres d'art creades per joves que treballen amb un artista visual; obres que responen als paisatges lingüístics de Manchester, Regne Unit. Utilitzo un innovador marc per a la investigació creativa i la lingüística aplicada (Bradley i Harvey, 2019; Harvey i Bradley, 2021) que proposa una manera d'investigar la lingüística amb, a, dins, i a través de les arts. Aquest marc ajuda a considerar com semblaria, seria i que podria aportar un enfocament artístic dels paisatges lingüístics a la nostra comprensió del llenguatge quotidià i la creativitat diària.Aquesta ponència enllaça directament amb idees que estic desenvolupant amb Louise Atkinson; idees que aprofundien en la història de l'art, l'educació de l'art, l'educació lingüística i la investigació creativa en la investigació coproduïda.

Jessica Bradley és una lingüista interdisciplinària. La seva recerca abasta llengües modernes, estudis de traducció, lingüística aplicada i pràctica creativa. Ha desenvolupat i liderat una diverses projectes de recerca que aborden la relació entre el llenguatge i la pràctica creativa, inclosos els enfocaments d'arts visuals a les experiències viscudes del llenguatge (Multilingual Streets, AHRC OWRI Cross Language Dynamics) i la traducció en la producció i actuació d'arts al carrer. Està compromesa amb els enfocaments etnogràfics de la investigació i la col·laboració amb professionals creatius. Jessica és cofundadora de l'AILA Creative Inquiry and Applied Linguistics Research Network i coeditora del llibre Translanguaging as Transformation: The Collaborative Construction of New Linguistic Realities (2020). També ha publicat sobre etnografia (2017; 2020), pràctica artística (2018) i la investigació creativa (2019; 2021; 2022).

17:00-17:15: Pausa

17:15-17:45: Mónica López: Using linguistic landscapes to reach linguistic competence in the new curriculum

L'objectiu principal dels canvis curriculars és millorar la qualitat de l'educació en benefici dels alumnes i dels professors. Tanmateix, pot ser un repte per als professors pensar en maneres innovadores d'integrar nous components del currículum educatiu i trobar els recursos adequats per fer-ho. Aquesta xerrada molt pràctica presentarà i debatrà les maneres d'aprofitar els paisatges lingüístics per atendre la nova distribució en 'blocs' del currículum català, concretament el BLOC 1 relacionat amb el reconeixement de les varietats lingüístiques i dialèctiques a Catalunya, Espanya i el món. Això inclou identificar prejudicis i estereotips, saber fer biografies personals del llenguatge, i promoure el reconeixement de la diversitat lingüística a l'entorn immediat i saber fer un 'mapping' d'aquesta realitat.

Mónica López és professora d'anglès i professora associada a la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Té anys d'experiència ensenyant anglès com a llengua estrangera, és especialista en AICLE (Aprenentatge integrat de continguts i llengües) i experta en l'ensenyament de llengües estrangeres a través de la tecnologia.

17:45-18:15: Melinda Dooly: Presentation of the LOCALL project & app for gamifying linguistic landscapes

El projecte LOCALL pretén mostrar als professors i aprenents de tot el món com poden capitalitzar els paisatges lingüístics per a l'educació lingüística, reconeixent el valor afegit de la superdiversitat que els envolta. L'equip del projecte LOCALL ha dissenyat i produït materials que ajuden a fomentar l'educació lingüística global, a promoure el compromís amb la diversitat lingüística i l'aprenentatge al llarg de la vida, posant èmfasis en la vida quotidiana dels estudiants i el multilingüisme escolar i de la comunitat. Els materials ajuden a desenvolupar un sentit de pertinença mitjançant la participació activa en les activitats multilingües i espais interculturals. Concretament, l'equip del projecte ofereix mòduls per iniciar el professorat en la seva pròpia aplicació pedagògica de paisatges lingüístics, ofereix tutorials i podcasts fets per professors de tot el món que expliquen les seves pròpies experiències (en una gran varietat de llengües), directrius per implementar i avaluar l'ensenyament del paisatge lingüístic i una app per gamificar aventures de paisatges paisatgístiqes lingüístiques. Aquests materials seran presentats i explicats als participants de la jornada.

Melinda Dooly és càtedra del programa Serra Húnter, al Departament de Didàctica de la Llengua i de la Literatura i de les Ciències Socials de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. La seva recerca principal aborda l'aprenentatge de llengües basat en projectes amb suport de la tecnologia, la comunicació intercultural i les competències del segle XXI. És investigadora principal del GREIP: Grup de Recerca en Educació, Interacció i Plurilingüisme (Research Centre for Education, Interaction and Plurilingualism).

18:15-18:30: Pausa

18:30-19:30: Taller: Engaging with language diversity in public spaces through creative practice a l'encàrrec de la Dra. Jessica Bradley

En aquest taller els participants exploraran la recerca creativa en el context d'investigar les llengües a l'espai públic; una activitat que es coneix com a "Paisatges lingüístics". El taller utilitzarà mètodes i enfocaments del projecte de recerca col·laboratiu anomenat Multilingual Streets: Translating and Curating the Linguistic Landscape. Per a aquest taller, els participants exploraran la comprensió de les llengües tal com s'experimenta a la vida quotidiana i els mètodes creatius com a fonaments per a la investigació col·laborativa.

19:30-20:00: Torn obert i cloenda

Snapshots








Comments

"I'm really intested in raising a multilingual awareness to my students and you have been really inspiring to do that. Thank you very much!"


"The content of the presentations is not in my field but I find that inspiration comes from any field of enquiry. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about linguistic landscapes, the app etc and about the social and linguistic bearings of their being brought into focus amongst learners."


"Thanks so much!!!! It has been so interesting!"


"It's been really interesting. It inspired me for activities next school year. Thanks a lot!"


"Thank you for sharing all the information and experineces."


"Thank you a lot for your great presentations and congratulations on the project results!"


"Wonderful project! When do you expect to have the teachers' guide available?"


"It was so interesting to see what you have developed since I first heard about the project. Congratulation👏"


"I love the look of these apps!"


"It's been so great to hear what you've been doing and how you've adapted during covid."


"Awesome!!"


"Very interesting! Combining linguistic landscape and an app! :) Great!"


"Molt interessant la proposta de vincular la descoberta de paisatges lingüístics amb la creació artística i la implicació d'artistes locals."


"I really want to try this type of game in my clase!"


"Amazing work!"

Programme

Programa

Programa


Activities

67 Attendees

7 de julio

Programa

16-16:10: Bienvenida: Melinda Dooly y Mónica López

16:15-17:00 pm: Dra. Jessica Bradley: Engaging with language diversity in public spaces through creative practice

¿Cómo vivimos la lengua o lenguas en la vida cotidiana? ¿Cómo se configuran nuestras identidades a través de nuestras interacciones con las lenguas en el espacio público? Cómo se crea algo nuevo de lo que es cotidiano y banal?

En esta ponencia comparto algunas ideas actuales relacionadas con las artes visuales, la práctica creativa y los paisajes lingüísticos (lenguas visibles), con ejemplos de distintos proyectos de investigación (Bradley et al., 2015-2017; 2019-2021) que exploran experiencias cotidianas del lenguaje(s) o Spracherleben (Busch, 2012; 2014) mediante métodos creativos. Muestro una serie de imágenes de obras de arte creadas por jóvenes que trabajan con un artista visual; obras que responden a los paisajes lingüísticos de Manchester, Reino Unido. Utilizo un innovador marco para la investigación creativa y la lingüística aplicada (Bradley y Harvey, 2019; Harvey y Bradley, 2021) que propone una manera de investigar la lingüística investigar con, en y a través de las artes. Este marco ayuda considerar como parecería, sería y que podría aportar un enfoque artístico de los paisajes lingüísticos a nuestra comprensión del lenguaje cotidiano y la creatividad diaria. Esta ponencia enlaza directamente con ideas que estoy desarrollando con Louise Atkinson; ideas que profundizaban en la historia del arte, la educación del arte, la educación lingüística y la investigación creativa en la investigación coproducida.

Jessica Bradley es una lingüista interdisciplinar. Su investigación abarca lenguas modernas, estudios de traducción, lingüística aplicada y práctica creativa. Ha desarrollado y liderado varios proyectos de investigación que abordan la relación entre el lenguaje y la práctica creativa, incluidos los enfoques de artes visuales en las experiencias vividas del lenguaje (Multilingual Streets, AHRC OWRI Cross Language Dynamics) y la traducción en la producción y actuación de artes en la calle. Está comprometida con los enfoques etnográficos de la investigación y colaboración con profesionales creativos. Jessica es cofundadora de AILA Creative Inquiry and Applied Linguistics Research Network y coeditora del libro Translanguaging as Transformation: The Collaborative Construction of New Linguistic Realities (2020). También ha publicado sobre etnografía (2017; 2020), práctica artística (2018) e la investigación creativa (2019; 2021; 2022).

17:00-17:15: Pausa

17:15-17:45: Mónica López: Using linguistic landscapes to reach linguistic competence in the new curriculum

El objetivo principal de los cambios curriculares es mejorar la calidad de la educación en beneficio de los alumnos y profesores. Sin embargo, puede ser un reto para los profesores pensar en formas innovadoras de integrar nuevos componentes del currículo educativo y encontrar los recursos adecuados para ello. Esta charla muy práctica presentará y debatirá las formas de aprovechar los paisajes lingüísticos para atender la nueva distribución en 'bloques' del currículo catalán, concretamente el BLOQUE 1 relacionado con el reconocimiento de las variedades lingüísticas y dialécticas en Cataluña, España y en el mundo. Esto incluye identificar prejuicios y estereotipos, saber realizar biografías individuales del lenguaje, y promover el reconocimiento de la diversidad lingüística en el entorno inmediato y saber hacer un 'mapping' de esta realidad.


Mónica López es profesora de inglés y profesora asociada en la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona. Tiene años de experiencia enseñando inglés como lengua extranjera, es especialista en AICLE (Aprendizaje integrado de contenidos y lenguas) y experta en la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras a través de la tecnología.

17:45-18:15: Melinda Dooly: Presentation of the LOCALL project & app for gamifying linguistic landscapes

El proyecto LOCALL pretende mostrar a los profesores y alumnos de todo el mundo cómo se puede capitalizar los paisajes lingüísticos para la educación lingüística y reconocer el valor añadido de la superdiversidad que les rodea. El equipo del proyecto LOCALL ha diseñado y producido materiales que ayudan a fomentar la educación lingüística global, a promover el compromiso con la diversidad lingüística y el aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida, poniendo énfasis en la vida cotidiana de los estudiantes y el multilingüismo escolar y de la comunidad. Los materiales ayudan a desarrollar un sentido de pertenencia mediante la participación activa en las actividades multilingües y espacios interculturales. Concretamente, el equipo del proyecto ofrece módulos para iniciar al profesorado en su propia aplicación pedagógica de paisajes lingüísticos, ofrece tutoriales y podcasts realizados por profesores de todo el mundo que explican sus propias experiencias (en una gran variedad de lenguas), directrices para implementar y evaluar la enseñanza del paisaje lingüístico y una app para gamificar aventuras de paisajes lingüísticos. Estos materiales serán presentados y explicados a los participantes de la jornada.

Melinda Dooly es cátedra del programa Serra Húnter, en el Departamento de Didáctica de la Lengua y de la Literatura y de las Ciencias Sociales de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona. Su principal investigación aborda el aprendizaje de lenguas basado en proyectos con apoyo de la tecnología, la comunicación intercultural y las competencias del siglo XXI. Es investigadora principal del GREIP: Grupo de Investigación en Educación, Interacción y Plurilingüismo (Research Centre for Education, Interaction and Plurilingualism).

18:15-18:30: Pausa

18:30-19:30: Taller: Engaging with language diversity in public spaces through creative practice a l'encàrrec de la Dra. Jessica Bradley

En este taller los participantes explorarán la investigación creativa mientras exploran las lenguas en el espacio público; una actividad que se conoce como "paisajes lingüísticos". El taller utilizará métodos y enfoques del proyecto de investigación colaborativo llamado Multilingual Streets: Translating and Curating the Linguistic Landscape. Para este taller, los participantes explorarán la comprensión de las lenguas tal y como se experimenta en la vida cotidiana y los métodos creativos como fundamentos para la investigación colaborativa.

19:30-20:00: Turno abierto y clausura


homepage

Previous

1. The goal of the first meeting (kick-off), taking place in Hamburg (11/2019), will be to discuss
further the:
- planning of the projects
- task and responsibilities and internal cooperation
- impact and sustainability approach
- financial and administrative rules of the project
- dissemination plan (including dissemination activities)
- quality assurance
2. Second meeting: Groningen (06/2020)
topics will be: state of the art of Output 1, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 2), sustainability and dissemination.
3. Third meeting: Aveiro (12/2020)
topics will be: state and conclusion of Output 2 (which should be close to completion at this point), progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management, progress of the output development (mainly for IO 3 and 4), sustainability and
dissemination.
4. Fourth meeting: Strasbourg (06/2021)
topics will be: state of the art of Outputs 3 and 4 (they are being developed and their testing and
evaluation should be thoroughly discussed, in order to collect the appropriate data), progress on
impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration and management,
sustainability and dissemination.
5. Fifth meeting: Barcelona (12/2021)
topics are: presentation of IO 3 and 4, planning of IO 5 and task distribution, preparation of multiplier events, progress on impact of the project and stakeholder involvement, project administration, preparation of final report (distribution of tasks).
6. Sixth meeting: Hamburg (06/2022)
topics are: Preparation of or/and report on multiplier events, project administration, discussion of IO 5 and final details on the final report.