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Bea also had curled fingers and toes which was a sign of arthrogryposis.

One of the first tells of Bea Rienhoff's condition was arthrogryposis, meaning that the fingers on her right hand were slightly bent or contracted. Although it initially seemed like a big problem, a hand surgeon soon determined that because it wasn't critical, it didn't need to be fixed.

Bea Rienhoff suffers from scoliosis, a curve in the spine. It is the most prominent in the number two lumbar region of vertebrae, which is responsible for providing structure and support to the spinal cord and therefore the entire upper body.

Muscular hypoplasia is the inability of the body to develop muscle, the most evident characteristic of Bea Rienhoff's condition. As she grew older, the right side of her body became progressively weaker because the growth of her muscles could not keep up with the growth of her skeleton.

Another characteristic of Bea Rienhoff's condition is a bifid uvula. This means that her uvula is split into two, similar to a serpent's tongue.

As a young girl, Bea Rienhoff's condition caused two variations within her eyes. The first was hypertelorism, which was characterized by her wide-set eyes. the second could be seen in her sclera, or the white part of her eyes, which, for the first few months of her life, were a bright robin-egg blue. Now that she's older, she is no longer affected by either.

4

1

3

2

5

One of the first tells of Bea Rienhoff's condition was arthrogryposis, meaning that the fingers on her right hand were slightly bent or contracted. Although it initially seemed like a big problem, a hand surgeon soon determined that because it wasn't critical, it didn't need to be fixed.

Bea Rienhoff suffers from scoliosis, a curve in the spine. It is the most prominent in the number two lumbar region of vertebrae, which is responsible for providing structure and support to the spinal cord and therefore the entire upper body.

As a young girl, Bea Rienhoff's condition caused two variations within her eyes. The first was hypertelorism, which was characterized by her wide-set eyes. the second could be seen in her sclera, or the white part of her eyes, which, for the first few months of her life, were a bright robin-egg blue. Now that she's older, she is no longer affected by either.

Muscular hypoplasia is the inability of the body to develop muscle, the most evident characteristic of Bea Rienhoff's condition. As she grew older, the right side of her body became progressively weaker because the growth of her muscles could not keep up with the growth of her skeleton.

Another characteristic of Bea Rienhoff's condition is a bifid uvula. This means that her uvula is split into two, similar to a serpent's tongue.

Bea also had curled fingers and toes which was a sign of arthrogryposis.

4

1

3

2

5

Another characteristic of Bea Rienhoff's condition is a bifid uvula. This means that her uvula is split into two, similar to a serpent's tongue.

Muscular hypoplasia is the inability of the body to develop muscle, the most evident characteristic of Bea Rienhoff's condition. As she grew older, the right side of her body became progressively weaker because the growth of her muscles could not keep up with the growth of her skeleton.

As a young girl, Bea Rienhoff's condition caused two variations within her eyes. The first was hypertelorism, which was characterized by her wide-set eyes. the second could be seen in her sclera, or the white part of her eyes, which, for the first few months of her life, were a bright robin-egg blue. Now that she's older, she is no longer affected by either.

Bea Rienhoff suffers from scoliosis, a curve in the spine. It is the most prominent in the number two lumbar region of vertebrae, which is responsible for providing structure and support to the spinal cord and therefore the entire upper body.

One of the first tells of Bea Rienhoff's condition was arthrogryposis, meaning that the fingers on her right hand were slightly bent or contracted. Although it initially seemed like a big problem, a hand surgeon soon determined that because it wasn't critical, it didn't need to be fixed.

Bea also had curled fingers and toes which was a sign of arthrogryposis.