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First we need the author or authors. In this case, there are three and it is difficult to tell who the lead author is. Does this matter? Yes! In most disciplines author order is very intentional. How do we find the lead author? Return to the database result and look at their list order. Now that we have the order, we can start building our citation. Ott-Holland, C. J., Shepherd, W. J., & Ryan, A. M.

This quick guide will help you locate the elements you need to correctly cite a journal article in APA 7th ed. Follow the numbers then check out What If? for answers about variations and +Read More for information about bibliography formatting.

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Now we need the publication date. This may be in a different location on every article. It might be on the top of the first page, it might be on the bottom of the first page, or the bottom of the second page and every page thereafter. It may not appear on the article at all and you'll need to return to the database result. Here, it is easily available at the top of the first page. Ott-Holland, C. J., Shepherd, W. J., & Ryan, A. M. (2017). Journal articles only need the year. Magazine, trade publication, and newspaper articles need the full date, e.g. (2019, January 1). If you're not sure if your source is a journal or magazine you may need to do additional research. Remember, not all journals will be called Journal of...

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Next we will need the title of the article. This will usually be at the start of the article. Don't confuse the journal title with the article title. Capitalize the 1) first word in the title, 2) the first word after a colon, and 3) any words that are proper nouns. End with a period, unless the title ends with other punctuation. Ott-Holland, C. J., Shepherd, W. J., & Ryan, A. M. (2017). Examining wellness programs over time: Predicting participation and workplace outcomes.

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We're almost there! The next set of information we need is related to the journal. We will need the journal title, volume number, issue number, and the inclusive page numbers for the article. On some articles all of this information will be available on the first page. If any of the information is not visible on the article return to the database result. Journal Title Include the full journal title, in italics, capitalizing any words that are capitalized in the publication. End with a comma. Ott-Holland, C. J., Shepherd, W. J., & Ryan, A. M. (2017). Examining wellness programs over time: Predicting participation and workplace outcomes. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Volume, Issue, and Page Numbers Stay in italics to add the volume number. Then switch back to plain text to add the issue in parentheses, with no space between the volume and issue. End with a comma. Finally, add a space then the inclusive pages with a dash between the first and last page numbers. End with a period. Ott-Holland, C. J., Shepherd, W. J., & Ryan, A. M. (2017). Examining wellness programs over time: Predicting participation and workplace outcomes. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 24(1), 163-179.

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What if?

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The final citation step is to explain to readers how you accessed the article. This can get complicated if an article does not have a Digital Object Identifier (DOI). In this case, we have a DOI. Note: The formatting for DOI's in citations has changed between APA 6th ed. and APA 7th ed. You will now include the DOI in http/https format. Ott-Holland, C. J., Shepherd, W. J., & Ryan, A. M. (2017). Examining wellness programs over time: Predicting participation and workplace outcomes. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 24(1), 163-179. https://doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000096 Congratulations, you're done! A perfectly cited journal article!

What if my article doesn't have a date? (Use n.d. instead of the date.) What if my article has an organization as the author? (Use the organization name.) What if my article is a book or a website or an interactive image from my librarian? (That's a little more complicated...) There are lots of variations for citations. The library does not have an eBook copy of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association 7th ed., but the APA Style Blog or the OWL at Purdue can help with formatting. You can also consult online with the Boise State Writing Center!

Well-formatted citations are not helpful if your bibliography or reference list is a mess. Visit the next page for a few notes about formatting bibliographies.

Continue page numbers through all of your reference pages

Begin your References on a new page and place the title in bold. You should have a reference citation for every item cited in the text.

All citations should be in Alphabetical order by the first term in the citation. Remember, this may be the lead author last name, organizational author name, or title if there is no author.

After the first line of your citation, indent all subsequent lines 0.5" - this is called a hanging indent. You can set this up in Microsoft Word under the Paragraph settings.

Your reference page should continue to use a 1" margin.

Continue to use double-spacing with no extra space between citations.

Your professor may have specific preferences related to formatting citations or reference pages that utilize optional or supplemental elements. Always follow your professor's instructions related to citation practices.