Want to make creations as awesome as this one?

Transcript

Get Moving Program Evaluation Project

UW Community Oriented Public Health Practice

1

5

4

3

2

6

Project background

Gratitude


What we found

Project partners

What comes next

What we did

1

3

4

2

5

6

Project Purpose

Seattle Parks and Recreation Get Moving

Our background research, our tools, and our piloting experience

Recommendations and next steps

Meet the COPHP students, Lakema Bell and Get Moving, and the second-year grantee organizations!

Pilot findings and a summary of the grantee experience with Get Moving

THANK YOU!

1

5

4

3

2

6

HOME

PROJECT BACKGROUND

Healthy People, Healthy Environment, Strong Communities -

Seattle Parks and Recreation

In 2014, Seattle voters passed the Seattle Park District Initiative which created a sustainable fund that provides more than $47 million a year for Seattle Parks and Rec. One of the new programs that was made possible through this new funding was Get Moving, which receives about $260,000 from the Seattle Park District a year.


You can learn more about where the Park District money is going here: Open Budget website


An important note about the Park District budget (including all of the funding for Get Moving), is that according to the interlocal agreement between the City of Seattle and the Seattle Park District, activities for the Park District budget are planned on a six-year cycle.


The first cycle runs from 2015 - 2020. To determine what is funded for the following six-year cycle:

  1. The Community Oversight Committee will make recommendations to the City Council and Mayor about Park District funded projects, programs, and services, based on a public process.
  2. The City Council and Mayor will consider the recommendations from the Community Oversight Committee.
  3. The Park District Board will consider the recommendations from the City Council and Mayor in regards to Seattle Park District funded projects, programs, and services.

Project Purpose

In 2017, Lakema Bell of the Get Moving fund with Seattle Parks and Recreation partnered with us, 2nd year Master’s in Public Health students, from the University of Washington’s Community-Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) program to:

  1. Demonstrate to City of Seattle decision-makers and other stakeholders whether Get Moving funds are being utilized effectively to achieve the program’s short-, medium-, and long-term outcome goal;
  2. Demonstrate whether the community-led, grant-funded programs and activities supported by Get Moving fit their participants’ cultures, neighborhoods, and budgets; and
  3. Demonstrate whether Get Moving’s relational model works effectively as an approach for building trust and relationships across cultures and communities.

Over the course of 10 weeks, we designed and implemented a program evaluation following community-based participatory research principles (CBPR) to meet these goals. To meet the three goals of our evaluation, we did:


à An intensive literature review, key informant interviews and program observations with Get Moving's 8 second-year grantees

à Thorough research into the validity of the Get Moving Model through a nationwide scan of cities' Park and Recreation Departments

à A review and revision of existing evaluation materials, and development of a new evaluation package

à Analysis of findings and development of recommendations


Our findings are scheduled for dissemination on March 8th and 9th, 2017 via presentation and full report.

Learn more about

Get Moving!

Healthy Parks, Healthy You is now Get Moving

HOME

Get Moving is funding partnerships with community-based programs that fight obesity and encourage exercise and active lifestyles, with a special focus on under-resourced communities, seniors and youth.

The Get Moving model

An innovative program

Community Engagement Ambassadors

Get Moving wouldn't be possible without Community Engagement Ambassadors (CEAs), trusted community experts and leaders that serve as liaisons between the community, grantees, and Seattle Parks and Rec.


CEA’s are wonderful “connectors” in each community who are vital to the success of each organization’s grant-funded programs as well as Get Moving’s outreach efforts. CEAs help expand the breadth of cultural understanding and responsiveness offered by Get Moving programs, as CEAs come from the communities served by Get Moving funded programs. At the same time, CEAs often work multiple jobs outside of Get Moving and often function in a part-time, on-call status; because of these factors, the role features a high turnover rate. Nonetheless, CEAs are essential to Get Moving’s community engagement model and uphold the program’s relational, trust-building philosophy.

The Grant Process and 2016 grantees

To apply and qualify for a grant, community groups and organizations must meet the minimum requirements of being community-driven, incorporating a strong physical activity component, and serving under-resourced communities, or seniors and youth. Grants are then awarded to applicants based how they rank according to the following criteria:

· Quality of project

· Community impact

· Feasibility and organizational capacity

· Sustainability

An independent “peer” panel of nonprofit organizations, community members, and Seattle Parks and Recreation representatives review applications and determines which groups will receive grant funding. Community Engagement Ambassadors (CEAs), play an important role in supporting organizations during and after the grant application process.


The grants range from $2,500 to $15,000. In 2016, $125,000 of Get Moving’s total $260,000 was directly implemented through grants, with 40% of funds supporting youth-serving organizations, 30% supporting senior-serving organizations, and 30% supporting organizations serving under-resourced populations. The 2016 the grantees, their awards, and the way the fund follows:



Logic Model: How it's Supposed to Work


Lakema Bell

To apply and qualify for a grant, community groups and organizations must meet the minimum requirements of being community-driven, incorporating a strong physical activity component, and serving under-resourced communities, or seniors and youth. Grants are then awarded to applicants based how they rank according to the following criteria:

· Quality of project

· Community impact

· Feasibility and organizational capacity

· Sustainability

An independent “peer” panel of nonprofit organizations, community members, and Seattle Parks and Recreation representatives review applications and determines which groups will receive grant funding. Community Engagement Ambassadors (CEAs), play an important role in supporting organizations during and after the grant application process.


The grants range from $2,500 to $15,000. In 2016, $125,000 of Get Moving’s total $260,000 was directly implemented through grants, with 40% of funds supporting youth-serving organizations, 30% supporting senior-serving organizations, and 30% supporting organizations serving under-resourced populations. The 2016 the grantees, their awards, and the way the fund follows:



1

2

3

4

5

6

Get Moving wouldn't be possible without Community Engagement Ambassadors (CEAs), trusted community experts and leaders that serve as liaisons between the community, grantees, and Seattle Parks and Rec.


CEA’s are wonderful “connectors” in each community who are vital to the success of each organization’s grant-funded programs as well as Get Moving’s outreach efforts. CEAs help expand the breadth of cultural understanding and responsiveness offered by Get Moving programs, as CEAs come from the communities served by Get Moving funded programs. At the same time, CEAs often work multiple jobs outside of Get Moving and often function in a part-time, on-call status; because of these factors, the role features a high turnover rate. Nonetheless, CEAs are essential to Get Moving’s community engagement model and uphold the program’s relational, trust-building philosophy.

To apply and qualify for a grant, community groups and organizations must meet the minimum requirements of being community-driven, incorporating a strong physical activity component, and serving under-resourced communities, or seniors and youth. Grants are then awarded to applicants based how they rank according to the following criteria:

· Quality of project

· Community impact

· Feasibility and organizational capacity

· Sustainability

An independent “peer” panel of nonprofit organizations, community members, and Seattle Parks and Recreation representatives review applications and determines which groups will receive grant funding. Community Engagement Ambassadors (CEAs), play an important role in supporting organizations during and after the grant application process.


The grants range from $2,500 to $15,000. In 2016, $125,000 of Get Moving’s total $260,000 was directly implemented through grants, with 40% of funds supporting youth-serving organizations, 30% supporting senior-serving organizations, and 30% supporting organizations serving under-resourced populations. The 2016 the grantees, their awards, and the way the fund follows:




PROJECT PARTNERS

The Grantees

UW COPHP Students

We are Erika Foldyna, Christina Garcia, Ada Lin, Alexis Meister, Chanda Moellenberg, Carolanne Sanders, Jamie Smeland. We are second-year Masters in Public Health students in UW's Community Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) Program, advised by Peter House.


We are very grateful for the opportunity to learn about and practice evaluation and community development with our community partners, Get Moving and Lakema Bell, as well as each of the 8 grantee organizations that welcomed us into their space.

Lakema Bell and Get Moving

1

HOME

2

3

4

5

6

We are Erika Foldyna, Christina Garcia, Ada Lin, Alexis Meister, Chanda Moellenberg, Carolanne Sanders, Jamie Smeland. We are second-year Masters in Public Health students in UW's Community Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) Program, advised by Peter House.


We are very grateful for the opportunity to learn about and practice evaluation and community development with our community partners, Get Moving and Lakema Bell, as well as each of the 8 grantee organizations that welcomed us into their space.

Young Women Empowered

(Y-WE)

Vision Loss Connections

Sea Mar

Nailah Harris

Lao Women Association

Garinagu HounGua

Father and Sons Together (FAST)

Austin

Foundation

2017 2nd year Grantees

1

2

3

4

5

6

HOME

Mission

to transform lives, through education, positive mentors and providing accessible, safe, interactive opportunities for young people to experience the benefits of a healthy lifestyle.

The Austin Foundation offers fitness programs for youth and adults throughout Seattle and King County. Some programs are offered in schools, others are offered in community centers. One program they offer is a mother and child fitness class tailored for East African women and their children. This program is hosted at Rainier Vista Neighborhood Home and New Holly Gathering Hall.

Activities

Austin Foundation

HOME

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to Grantees

Mission

To foster and strengthen the relationship between a father/son by working together with the goal of strengthening our families and the communities where we live.
Fatherhood | Family | Community

Imagine: Fathers and Sons sharing first time activities together and joining others of the same; gaining strength from each other.

Activities

Fathers and Sons Together (FAST)

HOME

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to Grantees

Mission

To maintain and rescue Garifuna heritage, and to connect Garifuna people in Seattle, building a strong community.

Teaching our kids about their culture; that is a top priotity for Garinagu HounGua.

Garinagu HounGua seeks to solidify the Garifuna heritage by passing on to our kids the traditions, language, and dances that are a representative of our culture and our overall identity. We strive to form a sense of pride in our kids.

Activities

Garinagu HounGua

HOME

Dancing, laughter, commmunity:

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to Grantees

Mission

To reunite and accommodate all Lao Women in WA. but not limited to: the seniors (elders), the disabled and others.

The Lao Women Association builds community together by playing badminton together; walking, picnic and playing, practicing traditional Lao dance.

Activities

Lao Women Association

HOME

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to Grantees

Mission

To create a positive space where families of all ages, backgrounds and communities can have a cultural multigenerational experience. Now is the time to honor our elders while encouraging them to shift leadership, responsibility and opportunity to the youth of today.

Dance classes of all types: African dance, hip hop, cheer moves, zumba, lyrical dancing, playing the Djembe drum.

Activities

Nailah Harris

HOME

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to Grantees


This year, there will also be a culminating weekend celebration and bazaar, of out of town guest artist workshops and a concert that will be produced, performed, and executed by youth.

Mission

South Park’s youth now have the opportunity to play against other teams while the program remains an accessible soccer club within the South Park community.

Sea Mar:

HOME

South Park Youth Soccer Program

a collaboration between Sea Mar and the South Park Community Center, South Park Youth Soccer has become a beloved community program

Back to Grantees

1

2

3

4

5

6

Mission

In pursuit of enjoyment, discovery and community.

Vision Loss Connections

HOME

Activities

For more than a decade, Vision Loss Connections has served the blind and low vision community in the Puget Sound Region, strengthening access to arts and culture, sports and recreation, support and education!

Meet the Seattle King Cobras!

Twelve-year-old Su Park, the youngest member of the Seattle King Cobras, had never played a sport before. "I personally felt a little left out in the sighted society. But that sense of being left out is totally gone when it comes to this team." she says.

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to Grantees

Mission

To empower young women from diverse backgrounds to step up as leaders in their schools, communities and the world. We do this through intergenerational mentorship, intercultural collaboration, and creative programs that equip girls with the confidence, resiliency, and leadership skills needed to achieve their goals and improve their communities.

Young Women Empowered

HOME

Activities

Young Women Empowered offers a diverse set of activities, from an Annual Career Day, Summer Camp, workshops, hikes, and more!

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to Grantees

Young Women Empowered provided dance classes to more than 50 girls and women; teens and elders dancing together. Young Women Empowered hosted eight dance classes, inspiring participants to move creatively and joyfully. The program helped to ignite participants’ passion for dance while exploring the rich cultures of the African Diaspora.

There's no creativity without fun, No innovation without creativity, No success without innovation. Are you ready to do awesome things?

There's no creativity without fun, No innovation without creativity, No success without innovation. Are you ready to do awesome things?

Municipalities Research

Toolkit Pilot Plan

Evaluation Toolkit

WHAT WE DID

Our work to conduct this program evaluation project involved the following major steps:

We chose 30 cities like Seattle in size. Then we conducted online/phone research to learn if Parks & Rec in these cities had initiatives like Get Moving. We asked about 1) grant-offering programs, 2) community-based, culturally-tailored programs, and 3) peer-to-peer structure.


We consulted with experts on community-based methods and youth-friendly evaluation tools. Then we improved Get Moving's existing survey and summarized 2016 data. We also designed new evaluation tools including focus groups, individual interviews, and arts-based activities, and packaged all tools into one single "toolkit", complete with user guides.


We piloted (tested) the toolkit with grantee leadership and members to see what worked and what didn't. Based on what we heard during the piloting process, we 1) modified our toolkit, 2) summarized our findings, and 3) created some Action Steps that Get Moving can take to better support grantees.

1

2

3

4

5

6

HOME

TITLE


There's no creativity without fun,

No innovation without creativity,

No success without innovation.

Are you ready to do awesome things?



HOME

WHAT WE FOUND

Through our conversations with grantees, we heard many themes regarding the Get Moving fund and its impact on the organizations and communities. Every organization expressed deep gratitude for the Get Moving fund and its role in supporting their work. Get Moving has helped numerous organizations in Seattle provide fun, engaging and culturally-relevant activities, while building strong friendships and communities throughout the process. The organizations are deeply invested in the success and longevity of the Get Moving fund. These themes are taken directly from our conversations with grantees; while they don't not capture all the wisdom and detail of these conversations, it can provide general insight into the experience of grantees involved with Get Moving.

For evaluation, Get Moving grantees appreciated a shorter survey, as well the guides for focus groups and interviews that we piloted at their sites. Focus groups, interviews, and possibly arts-based evaluation tools and video testimonials may be options that can be personalized for each grantee to be culturally-appropriate and welcoming approaches to evaluation.

THE GRANTEE EXPERIENCE

PILOT FINDINGS

Our evaluation work drew conclusions in different contexts:

CEA INTERVIEW

As students spent time observing grantee organizations and learning about participation and programing, we also wanted to learn more about the CEA model. We sat down with one of the CEAs, Nancy, to discuss the inner workings and personal experiences of the Get Moving CEA model. Nancy noted that one particular group really loved interviews, and encouraged us to include an interview guide in our toolkit. Nancy shared that she got involved with Get Moving “naturally” when she was volunteering doing citizenship workshops for the City, and was “poached” to help translate documents for Lakema. She described her it as a “wonderful experience” because she got to work with Lakema and was also able to “put in [her] own knowledge”. Nancy says Get Moving has a “big impact” on her community. Her son was in a Get Moving funded soccer program, but she didn’t even know it. He made new friends and was able to participate in the sport free of charge. She noted that there are probably a lot of soccer programs but they are expensive, and not truly accessible because they require people to live in a certain zip code or have special needs.


At the time of our interview with Nancy, she reviewed the Pilot Plan proposed tools that we planned to pilot. Nancy was excited to see that the revised survey was shorter, the interview guide had good instructions, and that there were some arts-based evaluation activities (which she thought might be good for youth).

1

2

3

4

5

6

As students spent time observing grantee organizations and learning about participation and programing, we also wanted to learn more about the CEA model. We sat down with one of the CEAs, Nancy, to discuss the inner workings and personal experiences of the Get Moving CEA model. Nancy noted that one particular group really loved interviews, and encouraged us to include an interview guide in our toolkit. Nancy shared that she got involved with Get Moving “naturally” when she was volunteering doing citizenship workshops for the City, and was “poached” to help translate documents for Lakema. She described her it as a “wonderful experience” because she got to work with Lakema and was also able to “put in [her] own knowledge”. Nancy says Get Moving has a “big impact” on her community. Her son was in a Get Moving funded soccer program, but she didn’t even know it. He made new friends and was able to participate in the sport free of charge. She noted that there are probably a lot of soccer programs but they are expensive, and not truly accessible because they require people to live in a certain zip code or have special needs.


At the time of our interview with Nancy, she reviewed the Pilot Plan proposed tools that we planned to pilot. Nancy was excited to see that the revised survey was shorter, the interview guide had good instructions, and that there were some arts-based evaluation activities (which she thought might be good for youth).

THE GRANTEE EXPERIENCE

01

03

02

Get Moving allowed us to do more to serve our community

A recurring theme emerged through our conversations with grantees: these highly valued and widely loved physical activity programs offered by community-based groups and organizations would not be possible without funding from Get Moving. Some organizations had previously been operating successful physical activity programs that were in jeopardy due to volunteer or funding constraints. Other organizations expressed how Get Moving gave them the ability to start new programming and develop culturally-relevant physical activity programs for their communities – something they would not have been able to do otherwise. Regardless of the program’s background, grantees said that they would not be able to provide the physical activity programs for their community without the Get Moving Fund. They also expressed how valuable and popular these programs were, with many participants asking for programs to be offered year-round.

This grant allows us to run culturally-appropriate exercise programs that help people in our community feel comfortable exercising

Grantees stressed the importance of providing culturally-relevant physical activity programming that allows them to create activities that felt welcoming and familiar to people from their community. A representative from the Lao Women’s Association of Washington said, “we use traditional Laotian music and dance to get the older generations to dance and move - they feel much more comfortable with the traditional stuff, and we also incorporate some of the Western music and Zumba moves which gets the young people excited. Everyone has something that they enjoy.” Grantees repeatedly expressed how the cultural aspect of programs made them more appealing and engaging for community members. “Older people or people who are not in “great shape” do not always feel comfortable exercising in front of other people (it’s intimidating!), but dancing – especially cultural dancing – makes people feel comfortable and relaxed.”

The programs are more than just exercise - it is a social time for us to be together as community

Grantees repeatedly expressed that the programs made possible through Get Moving provide much more value beyond “calories burned” and “hours of exercise.” The programs offer community members an opportunity to spend time together and build strong relationships. Many of the programs foster the development of strong friendships that continue outside of the program. Most Get Moving programs are coupled with social events before or after class involving potlucks or parties. One person said “this program is fun and relaxing! It helps us unwind by exercising and spending time with our community.” Regarding the additional benefits of the programs, a community partner explained: “it gives us a sense of accomplishment…I can see that the ladies feel good about themselves. It is great for confidence and self-esteem.” As another partner explained, “A group of women from class been going hiking and walking - the class introduced exercise, and the relationships keep it going.”

HOME

Feedback from Grantees about the Evaluation Process


  1. The previous evaluation process was burdensome: The survey was long and confusing, and the collection and submission process did not work well for all programs. “We were told that we had to get a survey from everyone so we were running around trying to get hundreds of kids to fill out surveys.”
  2. The survey was not successful in some communities because it was not translated into the language participants feel most comfortable using. Even translating into other languages may not remove all barriers, as some people in the community do not read or write. So, gathering stories and feedback through other methods, like video testimonial, interviews and focus groups or arts-based methods, may be more appropriate and successful ways of gathering information about participant’s experiences with Get Moving.
  3. It would be valuable to have other ways to "tell our stories" about the impact of Get Moving. Many strengths of these programs are not captured in the survey, and are better told through other methods. “we would love to do more video testimonial, where you can see people’s expressions and hear their tone, to really convey their experience.” Powerful information is often lost in the evaluation process, so allowing organizations to choose from an evaluation method that is appropriate for their community would be better than the “one size fits all” survey.
  4. The evaluation process was not "kid-friendly" and we did not have a good way to evaluate children other than doing a head count or asking parents to fill out a survey.
  5. Grantee organizations want to collaborate with other organizations involved with Get Moving. For our evaluation process, we met with several grantees at a time, but it was a first for the grantees to sit down with each other. “it was a lovely meeting – a little magic happened in that room…that doesn’t always happen.”
  6. Grantee organizations would appreciate more feedback and communication from Get Moving.

    Several organizations expressed they had never received results from last year’s survey, or disaggregated data that they could use for their own program evaluation. It is difficult and time-consuming to implement multiple evaluations, so it would be helpful to use the mandatory Get Moving evaluation as an opportunity to evaluate their own programming. Receiving a brief report on their own participants’ survey responses would support their evaluation needs and help grantees identify needed changes and improvements.

    Other grantees said that the Get Moving grant requirements were unclear, and they were unaware they could re-apply for multiple years – so some basic information on requirements would be helpful. Again, for organizations that received smaller grants this year or did not get re-awarded, they would find it helpful to receive feedback on why, so they could improve their application next year. A recurrent theme from grantees is they are always trying to improve their programs and practices, and Get Moving could do more to support them in that goal by providing evaluation data and focused feedback.

1

2

3

4

5

6

We compiled a variety of evaluation tools ranging from a standard survey, interview and focus group to arts-based evaluation tools. We were unable to pilot any of the arts-based tools, but our findings from piloting the other evaluation tools is discussed in this section, organized by grantee organization.

PILOT FINDINGS

Lao Women Association

What we heard from a focus group:


Participants said that the LWA program gives them energy and helps people get out of their homes and into their communities. Grandmas that would otherwise have to stay at home to babysit can get out in the community and be active with their grandkids. It really helps to get the older, more traditional people to dance and move. They said, “it’s so fun!” This program bonds people together and develops friendships. After the dance class was finished, members themselves coordinated hikes and walking trips, thus expanding the physical benefits beyond the class itself.

The LWA program is unique because “participants have a say in what they do with that time.” Participants commented that the program “helped me get up in the morning” and “set out and do good in the community.” It even brings people into Lao community, for example, “We have a white woman who married a Lao man who brings their daughter to the dance class,” after hearing about the class. The program has become very important to the Lao community.

“People recognize the Lao Women’s Association now because of our program. People know what ‘Lao’ is now.’ This program only runs in the summer now, but “we want more funding so that we can run it longer.”


Feedback about the evaluation process in general:


The LWA has no interest in collecting data for their own purposes. Currently, they ask participants for informal feedback about the class. It is against Lao cultural norms for people to criticize a leader, so the leader often speaks for everyone. Women over 30 years old don’t like to speak up, but younger women are more willing to give feedback. Language barriers were an issue with the survey; if surveys are needed, they would prefer if they were translated into Laotian. However, the LWA would prefer to use focus groups to gather feedback about their program, as a focus group would be a more culturally appropriate form of evaluation for them.

“Groups fit better with the norms of Asian society.”

Those who speak English well can translate during the conversation to make sure all ideas are shared. Participants liked the questions we asked in the focus group. They voiced a desire for someone other than LWA leadership to conduct focus groups because that would demonstrate to the participants that other people care about them and are invested in the success of their dance program. Additionally, participants really enjoyed having a cameraman at their last class so they could show off all they’ve learned and what they could do.

“I can see you want to tell the impact [of this program] physically, emotionally, and mentally.”



Sea Mar

What we heard from the focus group:

The Sea Mar focus group had 2 participants, ages 9 and 10. They recalled they were sad when the season ended last year because they had to go two full months without the program. They commented that they didn’t really like the volunteer referees because they don’t always call all the fouls, but that they liked the program, had made new friends, and want to continue participating in the future. They said they didn’t keep in touch with their new friends when the program wasn’t active because of their parents’ schedules, but they look forward to meeting up with them when the program starts up again.



Feedback on the evaluation process

Participants mentioned feeling worried about the survey, but commented that the survey didn’t take very long, with one participant responding, “I lost a little bit of phone time, but that’s okay.” One coach suggested that the survey could be given out during the water break in the middle of practice, and brought up that parents would be interested in providing feedback as well. The coach mentioned that he didn’t have the opportunity to provide feedback last year, and would like to be able to provide feedback in some way moving forward. If interviews were used to capture coach feedback, they should be offered in English and in Spanish. Focus group participants gave mixed feedback when they were asked if they would like to express their feelings through art, replying they don’t like to draw or that “I would just draw a happy face.” The coach and participants showed interest in using video testimonials as an evaluation tool, in either English or Spanish, depending on each participant’s personal preference.


Vision Loss Connections

What we heard


All participants said the program increased their level of physical activity, and 92% said the program inspired them to continue to be physically active. More than 80% of participants felt the program created or strengthened relationships that they had with other participants. No one reported being dissatisfied with the program, while 2/12 participants were “neutral” and the rest reported they were either “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with the program.

We asked 6 additional questions developed specifically for Vision Loss Connections to address the unique experiences of participants with vision loss. Participants responded to each question and were asked to rate the questions based on how important or relevant each was to them. The questions with the highest ratings were:

1) I would exercise more if exercise equipment were accessible.

2) I would exercise more if other blind people in my area exercised in a group or were available to discuss alternative techniques for physical activity.

3) I would exercise more if transportation to exercise facilities were more readily available.

4) I would participate in more group fitness classes if they were descriptive and easy for a blind person to follow.

Many participants talked about the positive impact that the program has had on them. One participant said, “It made me feel happy.” Another participant said, “I’ve taken some yoga - the yoga I did, I don’t think I was getting anything out of it. I think I’m getting something out of this.” One participant shared a powerful story about how Goalball improved his health, recalling that that before he started Goalball his doctor told him that his blood glucose was at pre-diabetic level, but since starting to play regularly, his blood glucose has dropped back to normal levels and his doctor recommended that he continue to play Goalball. For several people, Goalball is their primary form of physical activity, and their main connection to a community of people who understands their experiences of being blind or having low vision.


Feedback on the evaluation process:

Because Vision Loss Connections has weekly practices throughout the fall and spring for Goalball, a survey is easy for community members to fill out, whether on paper or online. People were also interested in doing interviews; however, the arts-based methods seemed a little too foreign for their interests.


HOME

Limitations

We had only a short time to pilot these tools, and a handful of programs who had the capacity to provide time and space for us to pilot the survey, focus group and interview guides. We piloted a total of 12 surveys with Vision Loss Connections; for the focus groups, we were able to involve 2 participants each from LWA and Sea Mar; and we conducted a total of 3 interviews, one at Sea Mar and 2 at Vision Loss Connections. Had we had more time or participants our findings could have led to more comprehensive feedback on all our proposed evaluation tools. Despite these limitations, we feel confident recommending this evaluation package for use with future Get Moving evaluations.

Overall

Participants reported being pleased with the programs they participated in, and with the evaluation tools they helped us pilot. We know Get Moving values physical activities that are culturally appropriate, and based on participant feedback, we believe there is an opportunity to improve the cultural-appropriateness of the tools Get Moving uses for program evaluation; for example, offering focus groups to the Lao Women’s Association in place of surveys. The evaluation tools used during piloting have been revised to reflect participant feedback. Our process of revising the original survey, piloting the tools -- survey, focus groups, and interview guide -- and incorporating participant feedback should help ensure that the next time these tools are used there will be less confusion and fewer issues. However, we understand that other challenges may arise as new grantees and new participants join Get Moving. We suggest that this evaluation process continue to be collaboratively adapted by and for the communities that Get Moving serves.

1

2

3

4

5

6

What we heard from the focus group:

The Sea Mar focus group had 2 participants, ages 9 and 10. They recalled they were sad when the season ended last year because they had to go two full months without the program. They commented that they didn’t really like the volunteer referees because they don’t always call all the fouls, but that they liked the program, had made new friends, and want to continue participating in the future. They said they didn’t keep in touch with their new friends when the program wasn’t active because of their parents’ schedules, but they look forward to meeting up with them when the program starts up again.



Feedback on the evaluation process

Participants mentioned feeling worried about the survey, but commented that the survey didn’t take very long, with one participant responding, “I lost a little bit of phone time, but that’s okay.” One coach suggested that the survey could be given out during the water break in the middle of practice, and brought up that parents would be interested in providing feedback as well. The coach mentioned that he didn’t have the opportunity to provide feedback last year, and would like to be able to provide feedback in some way moving forward. If interviews were used to capture coach feedback, they should be offered in English and in Spanish. Focus group participants gave mixed feedback when they were asked if they would like to express their feelings through art, replying they don’t like to draw or that “I would just draw a happy face.” The coach and participants showed interest in using video testimonials as an evaluation tool, in either English or Spanish, depending on each participant’s personal preference.

What we heard


All participants said the program increased their level of physical activity, and 92% said the program inspired them to continue to be physically active. More than 80% of participants felt the program created or strengthened relationships that they had with other participants. No one reported being dissatisfied with the program, while 2/12 participants were “neutral” and the rest reported they were either “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with the program.

We asked 6 additional questions developed specifically for Vision Loss Connections to address the unique experiences of participants with vision loss. Participants responded to each question and were asked to rate the questions based on how important or relevant each was to them. The questions with the highest ratings were:

1) I would exercise more if exercise equipment were accessible.

2) I would exercise more if other blind people in my area exercised in a group or were available to discuss alternative techniques for physical activity.

3) I would exercise more if transportation to exercise facilities were more readily available.

4) I would participate in more group fitness classes if they were descriptive and easy for a blind person to follow.

Many participants talked about the positive impact that the program has had on them. One participant said, “It made me feel happy.” Another participant said, “I’ve taken some yoga - the yoga I did, I don’t think I was getting anything out of it. I think I’m getting something out of this.” One participant shared a powerful story about how Goalball improved his health, recalling that that before he started Goalball his doctor told him that his blood glucose was at pre-diabetic level, but since starting to play regularly, his blood glucose has dropped back to normal levels and his doctor recommended that he continue to play Goalball. For several people, Goalball is their primary form of physical activity, and their main connection to a community of people who understands their experiences of being blind or having low vision.


Feedback on the evaluation process:

Because Vision Loss Connections has weekly practices throughout the fall and spring for Goalball, a survey is easy for community members to fill out, whether on paper or online. People were also interested in doing interviews; however, the arts-based methods seemed a little too foreign for their interests.

What we heard from a focus group:


Participants said that the LWA program gives them energy and helps people get out of their homes and into their communities. Grandmas that would otherwise have to stay at home to babysit can get out in the community and be active with their grandkids. It really helps to get the older, more traditional people to dance and move. They said, “it’s so fun!” This program bonds people together and develops friendships. After the dance class was finished, members themselves coordinated hikes and walking trips, thus expanding the physical benefits beyond the class itself.

The LWA program is unique because “participants have a say in what they do with that time.” Participants commented that the program “helped me get up in the morning” and “set out and do good in the community.” It even brings people into Lao community, for example, “We have a white woman who married a Lao man who brings their daughter to the dance class,” after hearing about the class. The program has become very important to the Lao community.

“People recognize the Lao Women’s Association now because of our program. People know what ‘Lao’ is now.’ This program only runs in the summer now, but “we want more funding so that we can run it longer.”


Feedback about the evaluation process in general:


The LWA has no interest in collecting data for their own purposes. Currently, they ask participants for informal feedback about the class. It is against Lao cultural norms for people to criticize a leader, so the leader often speaks for everyone. Women over 30 years old don’t like to speak up, but younger women are more willing to give feedback. Language barriers were an issue with the survey; if surveys are needed, they would prefer if they were translated into Laotian. However, the LWA would prefer to use focus groups to gather feedback about their program, as a focus group would be a more culturally appropriate form of evaluation for them.

“Groups fit better with the norms of Asian society.”

Those who speak English well can translate during the conversation to make sure all ideas are shared. Participants liked the questions we asked in the focus group. They voiced a desire for someone other than LWA leadership to conduct focus groups because that would demonstrate to the participants that other people care about them and are invested in the success of their dance program. Additionally, participants really enjoyed having a cameraman at their last class so they could show off all they’ve learned and what they could do.

“I can see you want to tell the impact [of this program] physically, emotionally, and mentally.”


5

1

4

Recommended Action Steps for Get Moving

3

2

6

HOME

WHAT COMES NEXT

1.1. Action Step: At contract signing, supply all grantee organizations with directions and information on how to reapply for the grant at the end of the cycle.

1.2. Action Step: Familiarize grantees with Get Moving’s governance and funding structure.

3.1. Action Step: Gather feedback from grantee organizations and their leadership (staff or volunteers), not just feedback from

participants.

4.1. Action Step: Deliver a full copy of this report to each grantee.

4.2. Action Step: Provide disaggregated (separated out by grantee), easy-to-read data to each grantee at the end of each Get Moving evaluation period.

4.3. Action Step: Share disaggregated pilot findings data from this report with each of the grantees.

5.1. Action Step: Facilitate 2 meetings per grant cycle, one at the beginning and one at the end, where grantees can share knowledge and lessons learned.


2.1. Action Step: Provide each grantee organization with the full package of evaluation materials (e.g. arts-based, interviews and focus groups, and survey) and let them select the type of evaluation they want to use.

2.2. Action Step: Allow each grantee organization to add 2-3 individualized questions to the survey, interview, or focus group.

1. Grantee organizations want to have a better understanding of how the Get Moving application/award process works.

2. Grantee organizations need to be able to choose an evaluation tool that supports and reflects their activities and the communities they each serve.


3. Grantees organizations desire more opportunities to share feedback on how Get Moving can better support their work.

4. Grantees want to see any data that Get Moving collects, and many want to use this data to strengthen their organizations.

5. Grantee organizations would like more opportunities to share ideas, skills, and best practices with one another on how to improve the health of their communities.

Based on our research, conversations, and evaluation tool pilots, we offer Lakema and her colleagues at the City of Seattle Parks and Recreation Department the following recommendations:

5

1

4

Recommended Action Steps for Get Moving

3

2

6

HOME

WHAT COMES NEXT

6.1 Hire additional paid staff to support Get Moving and ensure implementation of these recommendations.

6. The Get Moving administrative team is incredibly invested in the success of the Fund, but is at capacity for providing support to grantees.

Final and most important recommendation:

Our

Gratitude

We are honored to have met and been able to support Lakema Bell, Get Moving staff, grantee organizations, and their community members through this project. Working together has changed us, and we hope these poems share insight into our personal journeys and thankfulness.

Through movement and trust
Learning new ways of being
Outside of the box


Mothers and children
Building strong bodies and minds
They move together


Communities rule
They can take care of their own
We observe, in awe.

Wet, green grass beckons
Soccer season has come -- YES!
Friendship, movement, fun!


What is most helpful?
We continued to ask, but
we had to move on.

Take a moment to

Smell the air, feel the breeze ...and

taste life through being


Excited, and scared
Let’s build together, heart first

Thoughts of you, daily


Parks and Rec office
Shops, cubicles, and workers
Pumped by Lakema